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Discussion Starter #1
I was wasting time on Car Talk and read about long threaded sparkplugs breaking off when they were trying to change them due to Al-Fe corrosion

On my last car i changed the plugs at 30,000mi (same mileage as Click And Clack F150 problem) and coated the plugs with antiseize compound.. And after never had any issue changing them.
So.. am I being WAY TOO ANAL, in preventive maintenance of pulling the 2012 Focus plugs and coating the long plug threads with antiseize compound, (would put a bit of dielectric grease on ceramic body as well)'
Or.. Does it read like a good idea.
(No problem my doing it myself) [driving]
 

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I think you would be ok to leave them in for 30000 miles or so, then remove and inspect or replace (even if they are rated to last considerably longer) The issue with the long threaded plugs mainly pertains to the 5.4L engine between 2003 and 2008 if I am not mistaken. The only people seeing the issues were the ones leaving it until 65000 miles or so, then when they go to change the plugs.. out comes the threads in the cylinder head or the plugs would break off in the head.. not a good situation. But by all means, if this gives you piece of mind, go for it!
 

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By Al - Fe corrosion I'm assuming you're talking about Galvanic corrosion. With the environment the plugs live in (a dry one) you don't really need to worry about Galvanic Action. Most of the seizing issues that comes with spark plugs is more from carbon buildup and the different expansion and contraction rates of the dissimilar metals. That being said, putting a dab on anti-size on the plugs is always a good idea, but its not a big concern. I would say, if you're really board one day, go for it.

Also If you're going to put dielectric grease grease on any part of the plug, use it on the wire connection.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
No, I can wait. Only 30,000mi for my Focus, now that i am retired is going to be a very long time.
I might check them and do it after a few years, just to be safe.
(or sooner if i get in the mood)

(I did put a lot of miles on right away getting used to, and enjoying my new Focus. But now I am retired, I normally only put a few hundred a month on my car.)
Thanks for the response. I do not need to worry about it as much as i though if it was only one truck model.
 

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Aurelius Pardus
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Its no big deal. the only thing Ive ever broken or couldnt remove a spark plug from correctlt was a triton motor. everything else, though maybe a bit tight, has been fine. just remember to let the head cool off so you dont remove the threads with it. (only applicable on aluminum heads)
 

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I've only ran into the problem with the triton engines, now if some one wants a tune up on a triton we send them back to ford, just so we are not at fault if they break lol
 

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It was only the 3 valve motors that were having the issue. Some of the modular motors would blow out a plug every now and then, but those were no more common than any other aluminum style head for seizing.
 

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It couldn't hurt, but not necessary. I imagine that these are Iridium plugs that will be changed @ 100K. At that point on my old Focus, the plugs came out easily (no special treatment there!).
 

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I've taken a [:)][:)][:)][:)][:)][:)]*load of plugs out of aluminum heads over the years and never had a problem. Small dab of AS likely woudn't hurt..........keep in mind it reduces torque application effort, and could lead to over torquing. Hand tighten till it seats..................then a quarter turn with a socket and wrench.

Stripped a steel cylinder stud out of a aluminum motorcycle engine casing once (I was retorquing it [with a torque wrench!] at 100m after an engine rebuild). NOT fun, and it was expensive. [V] Bad language did not help!
 

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I was wasting time on Car Talk and read about long threaded sparkplugs breaking off when they were trying to change them due to Al-Fe corrosion

On my last car i changed the plugs at 30,000mi (same mileage as Click And Clack F150 problem) and coated the plugs with antiseize compound.. And after never had any issue changing them.
So.. am I being WAY TOO ANAL, in preventive maintenance of pulling the 2012 Focus plugs and coating the long plug threads with antiseize compound, (would put a bit of dielectric grease on ceramic body as well)'
Or.. Does it read like a good idea.
(No problem my doing it myself) [driving]

I have heard bad of antiseize material, used on a spark plug. To some degree, the greases have evaporated (for me) and it has caked on, and become harder to loosen.

As for me, particularly if they are tapered seat plugs (like they were on my Mystique V6) -- i would just ensure that they are clean, and then lightly oiled, and then carefully made up to torque.

I would crack 'em loose and look at them, every 30,000 miles.

BTW, crack them loose when the engine is cold. They will tear at the aluminum head LESS that way.

Never loosen them hot!

Also, jet some compressed air down into the holes (before loosening them) to ensure that no debris falls into the cylinder!
 

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I was wasting time on Car Talk and read about long threaded sparkplugs breaking off when they were trying to change them due to Al-Fe corrosion

On my last car i changed the plugs at 30,000mi (same mileage as Click And Clack F150 problem) and coated the plugs with antiseize compound.. And after never had any issue changing them.
So.. am I being WAY TOO ANAL, in preventive maintenance of pulling the 2012 Focus plugs and coating the long plug threads with antiseize compound, (would put a bit of dielectric grease on ceramic body as well)'
Or.. Does it read like a good idea.
(No problem my doing it myself) [driving]
I have heard bad of antiseize material, used on a spark plug. To some degree, the greases have evaporated (for me) and it has caked on, and become harder to loosen.

As for me, particularly if they are tapered seat plugs (like they were on my Mystique V6) -- i would just ensure that they are clean, and then lightly oiled, and then carefully made up to torque.

I would crack 'em loose and look at them, every 30,000 miles.

BTW, crack them loose when the engine is cold. They will tear at the aluminum head LESS that way.

Never loosen them hot!

Also, jet some compressed air down into the holes (before loosening them) to ensure that no debris falls into the cylinder!
 

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Liz,

Keep in mind that if you do decide to use anti-seize on your plugs, do so sparingly and only on the threads. The reason being that most if not all anti-seize compounds contain metal and are conductive. A little bit accidentally smudged on the ceramic insulator near the electrode could cause the spark to ground out through the grease.

Vinnie
 

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.....keep in mind it reduces torque application effort, and could lead to over torquing. Hand tighten till it seats..................then a quarter turn with a socket and wrench.
Good point.

Lubricant on threads, is a quandry.

I have lubricated my wheel lug nuts (with grease) ever since I can remember, including the taper on the nut-faces, and the wheel.

However, I consistently under-tighten them. It often calls for 95 ft lbs, dry. I often would lube with a bit of grease, and then go to 70 or 75.

Never have they been a problem.
 

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I've always used anti-seize on plugs and silicon on the plug boots. I say use silicon at a minimum when changing plugs. I do see a benefit to pulling them and adding it. The longer you wait, the more of a chance it will be a pain when you need to actually do it.
 
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