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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a warm indoor parking structure. So all Winter it is in the mid 60F range.
Outdoors right now is 3F temperature.
SO according to the 1psi for each 10 degree rule I should check my tires inside and for a 36PSI outdoors I need to boost them to 42psi at my parking place.
I never did this before. but I also never had 40 series tires (235/40/18)
Anyone else do this?
 

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Personally, I'd just check the tire pressures with a pressure gauge when the car is parked outdoors and see what the pressures are (at work or where ever you car sits when it's not in your parking place). If the pressures are within reason, don't worry about it.

There's no reason to alter your tire pressures every time the temperature changes as long as pressures don't get bellow something unreasonable (30-25 psi). If anything, it would be more dangerous having over inflated tires while the air inside the tires slowly cools while driving.
 

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That 6 psi. difference sounds like the right ballpark, less severe winter temps routinely drop psi. about 5 lbs. in past experience.

I like the research suggestion. Check for normal when parked, then see what they show outside after parking somewhere for a while in your normal routine. Add for the difference where it's warm & check again when chilled well to see how it worked.

Neither pressure is terrible to run, but I'm sure you'd be happier set with enough air for a possible longer trip in the cold whenever that might happen.
 

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I've wondered the same but have not seen as large of a pressure swing as the math/physics would suggest. MY garage is closer to 40(F) when it's 10(F) outside though, so not nearly as large of a delta as you have. you car might even melt and dry overnight? Some nights the ice on mine doesn't even melt overnight in the garage, and stays wet all weekend (if I don't go anywhere all weekend).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've wondered the same but have not seen as large of a pressure swing as the math/physics would suggest. MY garage is closer to 40(F) when it's 10(F) outside though, so not nearly as large of a delta as you have. you car might even melt and dry overnight? Some nights the ice on mine doesn't even melt overnight in the garage, and stays wet all weekend (if I don't go anywhere all weekend).
Melt and dry. The snow melts off within one hour. By two hours the car is dry. The garage has 28 spaces. A lot of additional volume besides the actual spaces. Parking along the walls with the middle open space.
Even the entrance/exit ramp concrete is heated so no snow sticks to it.
 

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Wow, pretty fancy! I was in an apartment for the first 2 or 3 years after college which had a garage in the basement which was warm enough to dry the car eventually.

I've wondered if I insulated the outer walls of my attached garage, whether it would be so much warmer that instead of melting the snow and having a wet salty car all night, if it would be warm enough to dry it.

I've put a fan on the floor (and 1500w heater) to help dry the car but it still takes a long time at 40(f), and I suspect the humidity rises, making evaporation slower and slower. It's hard to get it to 50(f) even with the door to the house open.

I ought to add a water spigot in my garage to more easily rinse the car off. Better to be wet but not salty than to be damp and salty I figure.
 

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I can think of far more reason to stay in 60 degree temps than just tires. Many things on the car will like that.
 
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