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Discussion Starter #1
Considering a 2012 Focus. I understand Ford has addressed customer complaints with the DCT transmission with software update ( IPad somehow posted imcomplete message). However, some will never like the transmission because it is so different.

In addition, the 2013 Escape, which is based on the Focus chassis, will offer only a 6 speed conventional automatic teamed to one of three 4 cylinder engines - no DCT.

So the question is, will Ford stick with the DCT for Focus and Fiesta or revert to a conventional automatic? It would be truly unfortunate to be stuck with an orphaned transmission but it wouldn't be completely illogical for Ford to do so.
 

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I hope so ... DCT is a truly revolutionary design that greatly improves the driving experience. This is one of the best features of the new focus and I think it will prevail as the norm for future designs. No idea why they didn't put it in the new Escape.
 

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The escape has had the 6 spd auto for a few years now. I highly doubt you will see anyone orphaned with the focus DCT trans.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Escape is most likely sticking with the slushbox for its towing capability.
That makes sense. Plus the 2013 Escape engines (2.5 normally aspirated, 1.6 and 2.0 turbo engines) do produce more torque than the 2012 Focus, so maybe that's another reason.
 

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The DCT in the Focus is limited to 280 Nm or about 205 ft/lbs. The version in these cars is the 2nd generation from Getrag and the partnership with Ford. DCT for lower torque vehicles is here to stay with gear spreads approaching 8:1 in six or more gears, signifcantly more fuel effiency over hydraulic autos and even standard trans it only makes sense this tech is going to much more common.
 

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DCT will continue and a 7 speed version will eventually be added.

The higher efficiency of the DCT makes it an obvious choice to meet increasing EPA mileage mandates as well as meeting consumer's requirements for higher mpgs.

As for the Escape, as stated above, the Escape has higher torque engines available than the Focus.
 

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There is something to be said, though, about the ability to cool a conventional automatic, and the abiltiy of the torque convert to cushion the load, when towing. I still think conventional automatics will play a role in certain classes of cars, going forward. As for the Focus, no real reason for a switch to occur, if the behaviour of the DCT is brought into line.
 

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After my software update, the DCT in my Focus is much smoother. I am excited by the new Escape. I think it will be best in class. Right now it is very truck like.
 

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I think they will develop it more and with anything it will improve as time progresses. I don't imagine the conventional automatic worked all that well the first time it was released. I know when I was at the dealership they were talking about all the Ford lineup having the DCT in a few years. There are already heavy duty versions out and they just need to get all the programming correct and get them fitted up.

My only concern is will they make a radical change for next year and put out a 8 speed as I have already heard so we only have the 6 spd for two years. Parts may be a issue in that regards but my magic 8 ball say's wait and see.

Montana
 

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Its a great concept and build but controlled poorly (for now).

I'm no apologist for Ford but they're working on it and those lucky enough to have the latest TSB update speak extremely well of how much better it performs. The fact that they're actually making strides and getting better performace out of the package should say something positive.

I had mine in yesterday for the update but sadly they couldn't do it yet. Their IDS needs to be updated first then I can get mine done.
 

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Mine was just built in October so I don't have the issue others have had. My transmission is smooth as glass. Can't even feel it change gears.

Looks like the issues with the transmission have been worked out.
 

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This trans design is not new. As mentioned it is the 2nd generation, the basic design has been used for several years in european makes Renault for one. The primary issue for Ford has been the shift logic, software issues. Sounds normal for Ford.

Transmissions technology is the next step in meeting tougher emission and mileage requirements when automakers hit the "easy" things like direct injection, start/stop, etc.

Getrag is looking to expand the number of gears over greater ratio spreads with all kinds of clutch types, dry, moist or wet. Other makers are also chasing more gears and use in both low and higher torque engines. Just saw an article about a 9 speed low torque (< 280 Nm) fwd tranverse trans. This one was a hydraulic torque converter type however.


More gears over greater spreads offer automakers and drivers the ability to keep an engine at the most efficient rpm for mpg or power with almost seamless gear changes. By the time the Fiesta/Focus are up for a model refresh finding they have several more ratios in the gearbox is all but a given.
 

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I think DCT is here to stay and as previously mentioned, more gear ratios will be used. I read Mazda's ad about Skyactive tecnology, seems like much of the same ideas used in the Focus. DCT, high strength steel used in the chassis etc.
 

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After my software update, the DCT in my Focus is much smoother. I am excited by the new Escape. I think it will be best in class. Right now it is very truck like.
Mine is smooth as glass in D and very responsive in S1 - S6.[giddy]
 

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This trans design is not new. As mentioned it is the 2nd generation, the basic design has been used for several years in european makes Renault for one. The primary issue for Ford has been the shift logic, software issues. Sounds normal for Ford.

Transmissions technology is the next step in meeting tougher emission and mileage requirements when automakers hit the "easy" things like direct injection, start/stop, etc.

Getrag is looking to expand the number of gears over greater ratio spreads with all kinds of clutch types, dry, moist or wet. Other makers are also chasing more gears and use in both low and higher torque engines. Just saw an article about a 9 speed low torque (< 280 Nm) fwd tranverse trans. This one was a hydraulic torque converter type however.

More gears over greater spreads offer automakers and drivers the ability to keep an engine at the most efficient rpm for mpg or power with almost seamless gear changes. By the time the Fiesta/Focus are up for a model refresh finding they have several more ratios in the gearbox is all but a given.
Certainly not new - it was invented in the early 1900s but didn't make it into production cars until 2003. The Select Shift in the SEL up (etc) is basically the same Power Shift wet clutch automatic offered in the SE, but with the ability to shift through all six gears manually, without an driver operated clutch. In "D" position the TCM shifts for you but by selecting "S" (only D and S on the selector) one can shift manually (without clutch) in the "S" position. The Power Shift (with or without Select Shift) differs from the traditional automatics we're used to seeing in American cars, and in most European cars prior to 2008 (Ford Europe and BMW came out with one that year, the VW Golf Mk4 had one in 2003). These trannys have no torque converter but instead use automatically activated twin-wet-clutches in what is pretty much two geared transmissions working together. [thumb]
 
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