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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2004 SVT that I just started driving regularly after my wife passed it on to me. So I have a question about the wheel alignment:

the dealer my wife was taking it to last tuneup rotated the tires, fronts to backs for sure, not sure about left to right. So first is this acceptable? Not sure if the camber is such that you shouldn't do this. Handling seems odd in long sweepers like a rear shock(s) is dead.

Tires are well worn on the inside of the tire now, could be affecting the handling some but just not sure if they even belong back there.

Brakes - dealer replaced the rotors and pads with new before I took over. Wife complained that they felt weird at the pedal and weird when stopping hard. Car had a rumble under general braking but feels good at or near threshold. Well I finally looked at them and they are textured with what looks like a mesh on the surface of the rotor. So is this normal for OEM/Ford replacement rotors? Should the dealer have machined them before installing them?

TIA
 

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The Librarian
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First off...[welcome]

Now to your questions:
That "mesh" is most likely the final machining on the rotors.
Nothing to worry about, as it's meant to help bed the pads.
The last few sets of rotors I've purchased have all had that same surface machining.

Rotating tires front to back is commonly done on these cars and is nothing to worry about.

As for the tire wearing on the inside phenomenon...
Instead of explaining what you need for an alignment, let me quote one of FF's more prominent experts on the subject:
Most focus tire wear occurs on the inner tire edge of the rear tire. This is caused by too much camber AND to much toe-in. You want the toe to be at the minimum allowable "toe-in" specs. That's 0.08" on a standard focus and 0.04" on an SVT or any lowered focus. Keeping the rear camber at less than -1.5 degrees helps a lot as well. Since there is no stock rear camber adjustment, aftermarket camber bolts are the cheapest and easiest way to get some adjustability. For the front, keep a minimum amount of toe-out (-0.01" or so).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
First off...[welcome]

Now to your questions:
That "mesh" is most likely the final machining on the rotors.
Nothing to worry about, as it's meant to help bed the pads.
The last few sets of rotors I've purchased have all had that same surface machining.

Rotating tires front to back is commonly done on these cars and is nothing to worry about.

As for the tire wearing on the inside phenomenon...
Instead of explaining what you need for an alignment, let me quote one of FF's more prominent experts on the subject:

thanks for the answers. I have always been a car guy, SCCA racing etc, but after returning to school I sold my autocrosser and adopted my grandfathers diesel jetta. Getting in this car is like returning to my roots but I know so little about it.

Been reading some here and now know that the surging is normal, the first gear bog is normal and people love their SVTs.

So as far as the camber, is this something that is stock that I should have adjusted out with camber bolts or is it a normal occurance for SVTs and not to be worried about unless I am overly concerned with tire wear?
 

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rockcrusher, Ford blessed the Focus with REALLY broad alignment specification ranges. For example the allowable rear camber range is -2.3 to +0.3 degrees (a 2.6 degree spread!). We have learned that excess camber (more than -1.5 degrees or so) accompanied by too much rear toe-in is a recipe for excessive rear tire wear. Only the rear toe is adjustable. To get rear camber to manageable levels the camber bolts are the cheapest and easiest solution. Unless you specify specific rear toe and camber specs the dealer or whomever does your alignment will usually give you the middle of the spec "in the green" alignment. This will, however, in the case of a Focus, result in specs that will promote rear tire wear.
 
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