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Discussion Starter #1
I had a good one today. I had my car in for a second pass at the recall for the purge valve/tank deformation issue. The dealers like to do the multi-point courtesy inspections to see if they can also do some service they will get paid for (I don't think they get much for the recall work).

So, I get a call from the dealer saying that he was recommending a coolant flush and fill. I asked if how they came to that conclusion, i.e., did they do some sort of testing. I knew the coolant should be fine since I replaced it myself a little over two years ago with long-life coolant using a 60/40 mix of coolant to water. When pressed, the guy just said is "seemed a little watery, like it wasn't mixed 50/50." I'm thinking, what did you do, taste it? I'm pretty sure someone in the shop has one of those $2 specific gravity testers with the floating balls or even something more sophisticated.

No thanks buddy.

In my state we have mandatory safety inspections annually and they are performed by the mechanics that do any work to rectify any violations the find. Anyone else see a conflict of interest there? So, this results in a lot of unnecessary work and I've seen a lot worse than the one I described above. I've found a mechanic that I trust and who knows that I do all of my own work except for tire changes. But every once in a while I take one of the family vehicles to another garage and come across a lot of deceptive practices. Not too long ago, I had another garage do an inspection on my wife's van and I was given a BS failure on the brake pads. It was bad enough that I reported it to the state's vehicle inspection department. Still not too satisfying because even though I had good evidence of what transpired, there is little that they were willing to do to rectify it. All they would really need to do is run a few sting operations to clean up the industry.
 

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Second pass on the recall? Why?

I had a Chevy truck years ago, and I brought it to the dealer once for an oil change. The advisor came out with a little plastic tray. He pulled a small sample of oil, trans fluid, PSF, etc and then next to the sample was a color of what "good" fluids look like. Well, of course fluids can still be fine/good without looking like new. I laughed when he showed me the tray, but I'm sure they made a fortune scaring customers that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Second pass on the recall? Why?
They reissued the recall for some vehicles depending on when you had the original recall work done because they apparently didn't get the programming right the first time until sometime after they started doing the repairs. Mine must have been done earlier in the process because I got a recall notice saying they needed to reprogram to get the latest fix for my vehicle. So, many may not need the second notice recall work (which is issued under 19S22). I had my daughters Focus in for the original recall work shortly after I had mine done and she didn't get the second notice.

I wasn't too worried about it but I had to have the vehicle in for an estimate anyway because a lady ran a stop sign and hit my front fender/wheel.
 

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So... you intentionally use a coolant mixture that does not match the OEM specification and you're, idk, shocked, when a service dept grunt offers to get you back to spec?

Am I up to speed? Do I understand everything that happened? What are you looking to gain from this post?

It isn't "deceptive" for a shop to inspect your brake pads and say "We recommend replacement of brake pads when they are beyond (X) amount of wear"

You're insane.
 

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I just did both my recalls (latch and tank recall) after getting tons of letters in the mail about them... just had the extra time this month. It only took 3hrs tops and yes they get paid for recalls. Techs love that easy money.


As for coolant its 100K and 150K per the handbook.



Never take one dealers word, if something don't seem right... check around.
 

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I had a service writer say my pads and rotors needed to be changed when I went in for 'the works' at 35K miles. I didn't change them until 100K miles later and the fronts looked like they could safely go for another 30K miles.

The same service writer that almost had me pay for a loaner and water pump while my car was getting it fixed under warranty. A second service writer looked it over and said the pump was covered under warranty, and thus the loaner was too.

So... you intentionally use a coolant mixture that does not match the OEM specification and you're, idk, shocked, when a service dept grunt offers to get you back to spec?
A 60/40 mix of coolant/water would mean the coolant is less 'watery' since there's more coolant than water.
 

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So... you intentionally use a coolant mixture that does not match the OEM specification and you're, idk, shocked, when a service dept grunt offers to get you back to spec?

Am I up to speed? Do I understand everything that happened? What are you looking to gain from this post?

It isn't "deceptive" for a shop to inspect your brake pads and say "We recommend replacement of brake pads when they are beyond (X) amount of wear"

You're insane.
He said he runs a coolant heavy mix and the shop said it was watery, my guess they didn't even check it.

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So... you intentionally use a coolant mixture that does not match the OEM specification and you're, idk, shocked, when a service dept grunt offers to get you back to spec?

Am I up to speed? Do I understand everything that happened? What are you looking to gain from this post?

It isn't "deceptive" for a shop to inspect your brake pads and say "We recommend replacement of brake pads when they are beyond (X) amount of wear"

You're insane.
1. I am not seeing where I said I didn't use OEM coolant. My point was that when I questioned them on why they failed it, they could only come up with "it seemed watery". I'll test it myself tonight but I can almost guarantee, it's gonna be fine. I really don't have a problem with them running these multi-point inspections because they can catch some things I might have missed and point them out to me at no cost. But run some real tests, just don't come back to me with some BS story about why I should let them do unnecessary work.

2. On the brakes, it wasn't a matter of them inspecting the pads and seeing that they were simply worn down. They said that they were cracked down to the metal. I removed them myself and brought them in for them to look at again and they had about 1/4 of an inch or more of pad left and they couldn't find a single crack that was supposedly the reason for failing them in the first place. They flat out lied thinking I was just some guy who knew nothing about cars that they could dupe into an unnecessary $150 brake job - easy money.

I know I didn't go into all those details in my post but you seem to assume a lot before getting details that you could have asked for and I would have happily provided.
 

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I brought my Sienna to Toyota for an oil change. The advisor told me I needed new rear pads, and he showed me the measurements for the fronts and rears. I knew the fronts were good b/c I had just changed them. I knew I didn't need rear pads, b/c the van had FN drums on the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I brought my Sienna to Toyota for an oil change. The advisor told me I needed new rear pads, and he showed me the measurements for the fronts and rears. I knew the fronts were good b/c I had just changed them. I knew I didn't need rear pads, b/c the van had FN drums on the rear.
That's good. Should have told him that if he can find any pads on the rear, he's free to change them. [:)]
 

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I brought my Sienna to Toyota for an oil change. The advisor told me I needed new rear pads, and he showed me the measurements for the fronts and rears. I knew the fronts were good b/c I had just changed them. I knew I didn't need rear pads, b/c the van had FN drums on the rear.
Drums still have pads(or shoes if you want to call them that) that wear out, did you change them or even measure them?
 

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Drums still have pads(or shoes if you want to call them that) that wear out, did you change them or even measure them?
I've never heard anyone call shoes "pads" on drum brakes. No, I did nothing to them based on that exchange, b/c the advisor admitted that the tech didn't even pull the wheels off. Kind of hard to measure anything hidden behind a steel wheel + a drum. The van only had ~50K miles at the time, so I wasn't concerned about them.

He knew they F'd up, so he offered a free oil change.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've never heard anyone call shoes "pads" on drum brakes. No, I did nothing to them based on that exchange, b/c the advisor admitted that the tech didn't even pull the wheels off. Kind of hard to measure anything hidden behind a steel wheel + a drum. The van only had ~50K miles at the time, so I wasn't concerned about them.

He knew they F'd up, so he offered a free oil change.
Yeah, shoes typically last 3-4 times longer than pads in my experience. For one, when both types of brakes are on a vehicle, the drums are in the back and only account for about 40% of the braking. They're a lot harder to work on but even so, when we get safety inspections, the mechanic has to remove the drum to fully measure/inspect the shoes and to measure the inner drum diameter to compare to spec. I've had drums that were a bear to get off due to the lip of rust that can form around the edge.
 

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On my cars with rear drums, the shoes far outlasted the front pads, but oddly,
on the cars I've owned with rear disks, the rear pads wore out first...
 

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On my cars with rear drums, the shoes far outlasted the front pads, but oddly,
on the cars I've owned with rear disks, the rear pads wore out first...
Much smaller pad in comparison with the size of a shoe when taking into account if the brake bias/pressure is the same.
 

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On my cars with rear drums, the shoes far outlasted the front pads, but oddly,
on the cars I've owned with rear disks, the rear pads wore out first...
The only car I've had that needed rear pads first was an Accord, but this was a known issue for that gen. They'd eat rear OEM pads like crazy.

My MK3 factory rear pads have 120K+ miles and still show life. I did the fronts around 90K.
 

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As the OP stated, here in PA it requires a yearly inspection to allow the car to roadworthy. I just had my inspection done on Monday at the dealer that I purchased from, since I am also required to have an emission inspection also. I do most of my own maintenance also, and almost always replace brakes and rotors, and tires prior to the inspections due to the amount of mileage that I rack up each year.

The tires were installed 1 week to the day before the inspection, and when they called me up to discuss the results and what may need looked into soon, or fixed, he stated that my rear tires may need changed soon due to wear.
 

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I never sell anything that I would not do to my own car.It is my job to recommend what you need though.
You get paid for recalls but the door latch is 1.5 hours for all 4 latches.( not much time )
The vapor recall varies from .2 to over an hour with .6 being the common time.
 
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