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Im thinking about adding a strut tower brace in the rear, or getting a thicker anti-sway bar. What other options do I have with tuning it. I dont care too much about my stock tires, i want to wear them out asap so i can get some better rubber under there. So would a combination of having a professional setup my tow, camber, and caster help at all with the under steer. Seems like a cheap solution, seeing that my best friend works for a tire place and he would do the alignment for free. He aslo is very knowledgeable what tweaking measurements will do.

So where should I start? Better handling alignment, or rear strut tower brace?
 

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IMO alignment may help if only the stock setup has changed or you buy some camber caster alignment kit for focus.. you may just check the stock setup if ts ok then there is nothing to align unless u have alignment kit installed...

a Thicker rear sway bar will help most (after coil overs)... rear strut tower brace may halp also

but if i were you i would save for a coil-over kit if you want real handling
 

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The best bang for buck solution to reduce understeer on an SVTF is a larger rear sway bar. Most folks like the 22mm Progress Rear Anti-Roll Bar. Tony at NewEdge Performance sells this bar for $143.28.

You can then sell your current svt rear bar to someone else and cover most of your costs for the new bar. The rear sway is an easy install that can be done in the driveway with a couple of jack stands.

Another option to consider is the H&R 24mm rear sway bar. NewEdge sells this bar for $179.95. This is a great bar for autocross, but probably not the best street setup with the stock front bar and stock springs. You could find your car a little too tail happy.

My recommendation...get the Progress rear sway bar, sell your svt rear sway bar and go have fun.[thumb]

As for alignment vs. rear strut brace...A good alignment is always a good thing to have. The rear brace isn't going to help your understeer issue very much, if at all.
 

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Srsly, the svtf doesn't have a tendancy to be an understeering pig. The primary reason for the car to understeer is throttle induced. The cheapest solutino is changing your driviing line and give less throttle.

A rear strut tower brace? Don't waste your money. You don't need it.
 

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Hmmm, I have never had a problem with my SVTF understearing unless I was into the throttle while turning like mentioned above and I have thrown my car into some pretty fast, sharp turns and she sticks to the road like superglue!!! I have noticed at times when pushing hard around a corner the rear will want to slide just a bit at first but then it bites into the road and it feels like it's on rails, I love that feeling!! LOL
 

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First off, better tires are the first upgrade and most effective way to reduce understeer. More grip equals more force to change the direction of the car.

There's something to distinguish between here. Are you talking about low speeds or high speeds?

Personally, I cannot tell a difference in understeer at low speeds from changing out my 21mm rear sway bar to the H&R 24mm rear sway bar. The car rolls a little less, but it doesn't seem to have given me the quicker turn-in I was wanting while at the autocross. Increase the speeds (think sweeper) and the car seriously felt light in the steering and was on the verge of oversteering based on steering input. It honestly felt perfect with the springs/dampers. When I ran the car out on a small road course for an open lapping day, the car felt precise and in control with the higher speeds than autocross with just the rear sway bar size increase. A sway bar would be the cheapest way, and I disagree that it's too much rear bar for the street. The car doesn't hop all over the place in the rear either over rough surfaces. Quite frankly, I don't even realize it's there except for a little less body roll in the rear.

However, I still would like a more neutral feel at lower speeds, so I need to install my Koni Sport kit, which has been setting around for months now (it's what I have but is not what is best).

The second best way to reduce understeer in this car would be to get camber plates. The stock settings are horrible and cause sidewall roll over too easily when the car is pushed. To eliminate the problem in stock form, yes, you need to decrease your speed and apply smooth throttle through a turn. To increase traction due to traction loss by understeer, I believe a camber kit would give you the best gain next to better tires. Hopefully with the upgraded suspension I'll be installing, the sidewall roll will be reduced due to less body roll, but I'd rather have the camber plates if I had to choose between the two.
 

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actually...the best way to reduse understeer is to install a QUAIFE!!! by sending your power to the outside wheel during a turn, it keeps the tires planted during the turn. I've actually seen a bit of oversteer out of my svtf after my quaife install...of course, I was also pushing the car thru a VERY sharp turn at about 55 mph
 

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Actually, the cheapest way to change the balance is tire pressure.

Its a small tweak, but I had been running around 36psi on all corners for mileage and tire wear. I happened to be browsing a Miata forum and somebody was complaining about neautral understeer in their gen 1 Miata, the first answer was tire pressure. I researched it, and whereas in drag, where you lower front PSI to increase grip, you do the opposite for handling adjustments.

I now run 34-36psi front and 24-26psi rear. That sounds like a big jump, but its 10% over spec in the front and 10% under in the rear. Setting my pressures as such, a flick and lift will bring the nose tight into the the line RIGHT away and kick out the rear. If I plow in heavy on the throttle it understeers like a pig, and the only real fix for that is to be driving the other set of wheels. With the stock suspension, it was a small change in balance but you notice it if you're looking for it.

Food for thought. Beyond camber, toe, sways and springs, you cannot neglect pressure for handling.
 

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^^Robzor beat me to it. Pump up the fronts and let a bit out of the rear. You'd be shocked at how much of a change it can make. I left the autocross PSIs on after the event once, and when I turned in at one of my favorite fast corners before I get home I nearly lost the rear.

With just the right PSIs and the correct line, I have never had any understeer problems with the SVTF. Hit a few autocrosses and you'll learn how to take the right S.I.F.O line. (Slow In Fast Out) Makes more difference than anything you could ever bolt to your car.
 

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Pfft, state the obvious. [rofl]

It's funny because that's the first thing I check at the autocross (well, only thing I can adjust at this point) yet it never dawns on me because I go back down to almost stock for street driving to maintain treadwear.

Are you guys able to keep from having your sidewalls rolling over at those pressures? I found having my pressures below 40 psi would give me sidewall wear rather than just shoulder wear. I have to stay above 32psi in the rear to keep the rears from scrubbing off the sidewalls as well (hence why I want camber plates for the front at least).
 
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