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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone find the 1m30s warm-up time of the 2.3 to be really fast? I live in Snow... err, Rochester, NY, so this will come in very handy in the coming months.
 

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knightm3 said:
Does anyone find the 1m30s warm-up time of the 2.3 to be really fast? I live in Snow... err, Rochester, NY, so this will come in very handy in the coming months.
Absolutely. I was amazed at the rapid warm-up time when I first got mine, but then, it was back in late August at the time. Once, I watched the temp gage needle rise visibly as I pulled out of my driveway, the car running for all of probably 30 seconds at that point. I've never before seen a car that warmed up so fast you could watch the needle move.

I don't have facts, but my guess is that the engineers have devised some way (coolant routing or whatever) to get the engine temperature up very fast for emissions reasons.
 

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Lil PZEV said:
Don't catalytic converters work best the warmer they are? Maybe that has something to do with it... I have noticed the warm-up too and I'm sure pleased with it!
Yes, it's true that catalytics need to be hot to work. Not just warm. They call it "light-off" when the cat starts working - at something like 300-350 celcius (570-660F). The catalytic reaction creates some of this heat, and some comes from the heat of the exhaust gases. This is different from engine temperature, which is actually the temperature of the coolant. I still think the rapid warmup is deliberate by design, for emissions reasons, and I think it's because optimum combustion efficiency requires that the engine be at full operating temperature.
 

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Egz said:
But what is a 1m30?
I think he was saying that it took 1 minute and 30 seconds for his car to warm up. That's the way I read it. That's pretty close to what I was seeing back in September when it was still fairly warm outside. It does take longer when it is 30F in the AM, like now.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Egz said:
Shorthand for 1 minute, 30 seconds.

My guess is it has something to do with the Premium Gold coolant we PZEVers have. I'd never even HEARD of it before I got the car, and I'll bet it has some neat absorption properties that let it warm up a lot faster. It seemed like a lower-viscosity version of the ethyl-glycol [green], or non-toxic orange versions out there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lil PZEV said:
Don't catalytic converters work best the warmer they are? Maybe that has something to do with it... I have noticed the warm-up too and I'm sure pleased with it!
Yes, they do, but I doubt the catalyst has anything to do directly with the coolant getting warm faster...
 

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I wish my ZX3 warmed up faster, its always so cold here in the winter, usually about the time I get to where im going its just getting warm, and then I have to get out again lol
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I see you have an 00 -- Zetec I'm assuming? It must be the PZEVs that warm up quickly. What color is the coolant in your car?
 

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knightm3 said:
Shorthand for 1 minute, 30 seconds.


[?|] Didn't even think of that...

LOL. Well, its time for me to find out if my car comes with a 710 cap.
 

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Don't our PZEV's come with a variable exhaust recirculation system? Piping that hot air back through the engine might be a pretty quick way to jack the temperature up in a hurry, wouldn't it? I've also noticed the quick warmup time, expecially if you just start-and-go. Did that once but I don't plan on making a habit out of it...
 

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spapadillion said:
Don't our PZEV's come with a variable exhaust recirculation system? Piping that hot air back through the engine might be a pretty quick way to jack the temperature up in a hurry, wouldn't it? I've also noticed the quick warmup time, expecially if you just start-and-go. Did that once but I don't plan on making a habit out of it...
spap:

Yep, they have a fairly sophisticated, computer-controlled EGR, but I doubt that plays a major role in warmup. The combustion process can't tolerate EGR at idle, low speed, or high speed/heavy load. EGR is employed primarly at part-throttle cruise.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That, and EGR is nothing new. This car just warms up quickly.


spapadillion: If by "start-and-go" you mean just starting the car and moving as soon as possible, that's what you're *supposed* to do. Here's why:

Up to 95% of engine wear occurs within the first 10 seconds of starting a cold motor. Put the car into motion with as little delay as possible. You should never idle a car to warm it up.
Courtesy, Make It Last
 

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knightm3 said:
spapadillion: If by "start-and-go" you mean just starting the car and moving as soon as possible, that's what you're *supposed* to do. Here's why:


Courtesy, Make It Last
Make It Last? You have a link to an article or something that I could read? I've heard alot of different opinions on the subject, but never seen any fact.
 

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The other day, while running out for morning coffee, I timed the warm-up. Outside temperature was 40F, and in just about exactly 2 minutes flat, the temp gage needle was right up there at the normal position. I also took note of the fact that the air flowing from the heater vent down near my right foot was barely luke-warm - I guess the engine is enjoying all the benefits of this rapid warmup, not the passengers [:(]
 

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knightm3 said:
Up to 95% of engine wear occurs within the first 10 seconds of starting a cold motor. Put the car into motion with as little delay as possible. You should never idle a car to warm it up.

Why shouldn't I idle my car until it's warm? The only damage done would be caused by cylinder movement, right? So, why would making them move faster, through the obvious pockets of various temperature contained within the varying thicknesses the engine block, cause less damage? I'd assume it'd be better for it to become a uniform temperature before rapid movement is achieved.


But, what the hell do I know.
 

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spapadillion said:
Why shouldn't I idle my car until it's warm?
Well, there are a few reasons, none of which you may find compelling.

One, the engine emits more pollutants when it is not fully warmed up. The EPA would like you to start it and drive right off because loading the engine warms it up a lot faster. Probably most significant is that it lights off the catalytic converter a lot faster.

Two, the pistons don't fit the cylinders quite as well when cold. Results in greater blow-by which will contaminate your oil quicker.

Three, it is sitting there using some finite amount of gasoline to go 0 miles therefore you are getting 0 MPG. Again, the EPA would prefer you not do this.

I can't really come up with a reason that is related all that much to wear - the closest thing is #2 above.
 
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