Focus Fanatics Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hello all,
I have a 2007 duratec 2.0 somehow jumped time and wrecked all intake valves. I carried the head to the machine shop and had it rebuilt. when I picked the head up he had a note attatched to the vvt cam gear stating that I needed a alignment tool for it when I put it back on the camshaft. I have a timing tool kit with the crank locking pin and the bar that you slide in the back of the camshafts to set timing, but does anyone know about aligning the vvt sprocket? I thought it just bolted on with 53lbs. torque. thanks grandpaken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
Duratecs don't have variable valve timing as far as I know. Just lock cams and crank in place with tools and torque away.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
44,595 Posts
^^^^ Yup

Only the newest ('12 +) Duratec TiVCT version has this, and on BOTH cams now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
engine is actually out of a mazda3 but the guy at the machine shop called it a duratec he said they were the same but it does have a vvt phaser on the intake camshaft but I don't see how to align anything other than the regular timing procedure
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
44,595 Posts
Caught this in a PM but I'll add it here.

The zetec vvt unit on the SVT will set itself to the right place by spring tension so you just have to tighten the sprocket in place as discussed once otherwise set to time.

Double check how it works, and check with the Mazda guys if there are any remaining questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
thanks to you all again, going back together and well see what happens. these heads are just expensive to rebuild and I just don't want to wreck it again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,163 Posts
More to it than that, the VCT MUST be in correct position or the cam can be in right place but not be on the VCT stop inside the cylinder. When VCT then activates to position the cams affected then are wrong. The VCT MUST be in a known spot, why the sprocket on early ones gets loosened to allow it to 'spring up' inside the cylinder to zero, or the end stop. If you turn cams at all after that you then lose that again as the cam friction often moves the VCT off the stop again.

In short, crank, cams and VCT must all be in a known timing spot or problems. I'd be barking up the Mazda tree rather than here for more info. Ford is notorious for not pointing out with more vigor the VCT exact setting at least on earlier engines, they simply mentioned loosening cam sprockets and that's all you got. Abysmal for a world class manufacturer to do that. Later engines they go into detail enough to point it out exactly.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top