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Discussion Starter #1
A neighbor of mine just had the cab of his company's truck (which he parks at his house) tefloned! He claims that for the next 3 years or so he'll never have to polish or wax the cab again All he'll have to do is wash it because nothing will ever stick to it -- including birdie dookie. [:)] He told me that I could get my little screamin' yella SVT done for probably under a $100., and since it wouldn't be subjected to the harsh environments that his work truck normally is, I should easily be able to get about 5 years of life out of the teflon job before having it redone. (The cab of his truck, btw, looks great!)

Has anyone ever heard of this being done, or know anyone who had this kind of treatment applied to a car?

Thanks,
BumbleBee
 

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Never heard of that. But I hate wax and any stuff like it anyway. I feel it will leave my color ugly looking or something. I am weird like that, so who knows.
 

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Never heard of it until now, but that sounds like one great idea. If there is no ill effects to the original finish and it saves waxing your ride every couple of months then I think it's the best $100 bucks ever spent. Keep us posted, I'm gonna look around up here in Canada to see if there is anyone doing it here.
 

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In theory, that sounds awesome! You could also lower your Cd by a few hundredths. [;)]
 

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well teflon is a surface protector and if u look at the cleaning produts that use it it says that it keeps dirt from sticking ....hmm very interesting
 

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BumbleBee said:
A neighbor of mine just had the cab of his company's truck (which he parks at his house) tefloned! He claims that for the next 3 years or so he'll never have to polish or wax the cab again All he'll have to do is wash it because nothing will ever stick to it -- including birdie dookie. [:)] He told me that I could get my little screamin' yella SVT done for probably under a $100., and since it wouldn't be subjected to the harsh environments that his work truck normally is, I should easily be able to get about 5 years of life out of the teflon job before having it redone. (The cab of his truck, btw, looks great!)

Has anyone ever heard of this being done, or know anyone who had this kind of treatment applied to a car?

Thanks,
BumbleBee
Ive seen that done locally here, works real nice, but you have to get your car entirely buffed by a body shop first and then they treat it with the teflon, however that BS about it lasting years, you have to get it re-done every 6-8 months according to every shop here that does it, and for the buff and application it runs around $350 on a size like the focus unless you have some kind of hook up.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
heat is needed...

Euro, thanks for your input.

I posed this same question on another forum that that deals strictly with Detailing, and the replies were numerous and unanimous. Everyone told me to stay away from Teflon -- basically because to apply teflon correctly, it needs to be done with high heat. And from what you just told me, it's not very economical if one has to do it twice a year. I can detail my car myself for an entire year for a heck of a lot less than one teflon application, let alone two.

BumbleBee
 

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while we are at it, i got some ocean front property in New Mexico i would be willing to part with.
 

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While shopping for a car for my wife, we went to a Saturn dealer who mentioned getting a "Baked Teflon Coat" on the car. He was a horrible salesman, basically repeating exactly what the manual says on sales. He said that the car will be stripped, buffed, coated and baked. All in Teflon. Yeah. I should have asked him how much it will cost. I'll give them a call and let you know what the dealership costs on new cars.
 

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Workin for a local GM dealer (Ford wasn't hiring) doing reconditioning/detailing... we use a teflon system (http://www.simonizusa.com/System5/default.asp) and for what it costs, about $200, i doubt if its worth it. I have even heard if makes certain colors seem cloudy. [thumbd]

All it consists of is a "special" soap (which we let sit on the car for 10mins) and "special" wax, which is applied like normal wax.. no baking process or anything.. and we definately don't buff or anything first.. although i imagine the soap strips everything else off.

I am gonna try it to my black ZX3 soon, so i can see if its worth anything long term. As of now i am skeptical.. as are most people i work with.. [scratch]
 

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Wow,

Teflon on your car, well u will know if it works if u can crack an egg on it and fry it, it shouldn't stick, lol

Geo
 

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latingeo said:
if it works if u can crack an egg on it and fry it, it shouldn't stick, lol
Goodbye clear coat [;)]
 

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so if I teflon my car and on one of those hot summer days my eggs and bacon won't stick if I use the hood to cook them. COOL[hihi]
 

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just to add...,

The latest marketing hype over the last few years in the polish/wax game is contains "Teflon".

The fact of the matter is, that Teflon does absolutely nothing, except add some slickness to the paint surface, until the first washing. Then it's gone.

Teflon is a snow white powder that is not soluble in any part of the polish system. It is only dispersable in the solvents. Teflon cannot bond to the paint surface, unless it is subjected to at least 600 degrees and higher.

Dupont several years ago released a press statment about their trade mark product Teflon. In a nutshell, they said the Teflon added nothing to waxes or polishes as Teflon can and will only bond to metal while heated to very high temps. Basically what they were doing was giving a disclaimer for all of the
polishes and waxes hitting the market making claim after claim about how superior their product was just because it was supposed to contain Teflon. This came out about the time the debacle about PTFE resins and the Slick 50 product that also turned out to be a big farce.

To point to some concrete evidence regarding Teflon. This comes from Professional Carwashing & Detailing magazine, January, 1989, page 110.

A direct quote:

"My conclusion is based on the information I have gathered in the past year from representatives, lab technicians and chemists from many leading car care product companies, including DuPont, the maker of Teflon. According to G.R. Ansul of DuPont's Car Care Products Division, "The addition of a Teflon fluoropolymer resin does nothing to enhance the properties of a car wax. We have no data that indicates the use of Teflon fluorpolymer resins is beneficial in car waxes, and we have not seen data from other people that supports this position."
Ansul also notes that, "Unless Teflon is applied at 700 degrees F (371 degrees C), it is not a viable ingredient, and it is 100 percent useless in protecting the paint's finish."

As we can all see, DuPont answered this question once and for all in 1989,
over 10 years ago! Let's use the advice of the manufacturer of Teflon that it is no good in a car wax (except for marketing reasons) and move on.

Also, I never pay for dealership paint sealants and advise my customers not to, see below:

All it is is a polish/wax. Sometimes acrylic based. It doesn't last 3 months let alone three years. It's applied by the dealer or an outside shop. It costs the dealer about $10.00 if they apply it themselves or approx. $60 if farmed out to an outside shop. It's a great money marker for the dealer considering the additional 300 to 400 to 500 bucks they tack on to the sale of the car and salesmen joke about it all the time. The guarantee is useless and hinges on the laws of average. Don't waste your money. If these systems could ever work they'd be formulated in the paint or applied at the factory.....
 

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waynestowels said:

As we can all see, DuPont answered this question once and for all in 1989,
over 10 years ago! Let's use the advice of the manufacturer of Teflon that it is no good in a car wax (except for marketing reasons) and move on.
Not attempting to start an argument.. but like you said, that was 15 years ago! According to the official DuPont Teflon site, they do in fact back the Simoniz 5 system, but it is the only one they do so for. I had stated before that i was skeptical.. but it is still only fair to state the facts. Agreed though, whether or not it is effective, the dealer still overcharges for the amount it cost to apply.. the only good part, is it is like an insurance for your paint.. since they do warranty it for 5 years against any natural wear. A couple hundred dollars is alot cheaper than a new paint job.. especially if you live in a "high risk" area.. where there is alot of pollution, tree sap, or anything else that may ruin your paint.

A little more recent study tells a different story also.. from the EPA.. "The auto and coatings industries are fully aware of the potential damage and are actively pursuing the development of coatings that are more resistant to environmental fallout, including acid rain. The problem is not a universal one-- it does not affect all coatings or all vehicles even in geographic areas known to be subject to acid rain-- which suggests that technology exists to protect against this damage. Until that technology is implemented to protect all vehicles or until acid deposition is adequately reduced, frequent washing and drying and covering the vehicle appear to be the best methods for consumers who wish to minimize acid rain damage." (http://www.epa.gov/airmarkt/acidrain/effects/carcoatings.html)

But that even gives an alternative, a little dedication and sacrifice of time to keep it frequently maintained is key.

[thumb]
 

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Interesting:)
And definately not wanting an argument..., only truth in "marketing"
They state that this is the only product with Teflon...,
I could name 10-15 off the top of my head.

http://www.detailworks.com/Teflon.htm
http://www.paintprotection.com/
http://www.crownmotors.com.sg/painseal.htm
http://www.5starshine.com/
http://www.detailplus.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=DP&Product_Code=DC_WSP_TPPS
http://www.winnerauto.ca/teflon.htm
http://cpc-corp.com/pages/cpc-auto.html
http://subscriber.scoot.co.uk/brutus_enterprises/
http://www.advancedchemical.com/sealant.shtml
http://lanescarproducts.com/superseal.html

Extended warranties have been around for many years..., again, I could name several with "warranties" for 3, 5 and even 7 years.

I am skeptical in nature, which has happened over many years of "marketing hype"(remember Slick 50).
There seems to always be a "flavor of the month", whether it is detailing products, audio, martial arts, etc...

Until they can "prove" that the teflon is "bonding" to the finish, I will continue to be skeptical.
I would be very interested to learn how it "bonds" to the finish without any heat, given the molecular structure of PTFE
 

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Discussion Starter #19
no heat -- no bonding!

Waynestowles is right on the mark. On the other detailing site to which I subscribe, they posted the same DuPont article. There can be no bonding of any significant duration of teflon to a metal surface apart from applying it with high heat. (It will be very interesting to see how my neighbor's work truck holds up over the months.)

And regarding detailing products that contain questionable ingredients (generally speaking), one must be very careful when choosing products, for there are some really bad products out there that won't do your cars any good. Since I detail my own vehicles, I did a fair amount of homework on various auto care products and found that the vast majority of high quality proudcts were impossible to buy locally in brick and motar stores -- in places such as Pep Boys, AutoZone, Discount Auto, etc. Therefore, I do the bulk of my buying online at places that specialize in detailing products. And the kicker is that the high quality products available online generally compare favorably pricewise with the inferior products sold in stores. Go figure!

BumbleBee
 

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Maybe they all know something we don't [;)] or it could just be a big marketing ploy to make money for them both.. and with GM involved [?|] you just never know. I was just pointing out that DuPont actually says Simoniz5 works.. i realize several others probably say the same. Maybe i will send DuPont an E-mail and see what there official response is on the "bonding process", cause i am curious now.. will post if they respond [thumb] but it seems strange DuPont would say it isn't possible and then put out a product that says it is.. kind of a double-negative or something. [confused]
 
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