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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure where I should put this...Part 1 of the JRSC install.

First order of business was assessing the parts. They were mostly filthy, so I spent a lot of time cleaning them. After that, I look at the way stuff fit together. One glaring problem was the blower inlet. I have a larger 65mm throttle body (which itself required work) but the inlet was sized for the OE unit which is about 58mm. Time for a gasket match.

Here is how it came:


You can see that someone already had tried to work on it a little bit but had given up.

And here is the issue:


What is the point of a larger throttle body if the rest of the system isn't properly sized as well?

First step is to mark the area that must be removed:




Then it is time to grind it out. I like the grinding bits shown over the stones:


The result:


No more air obstructing lip!

Looking at this makes me wonder if I should work on the idle bypass hole. It seems to have only one large hole while the TB has three small ones. The way it looks, based on the gasket, is that only one, maybe 1½ of the holes in the TB will work. More to come.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
As with most anything, there was some fab to be done for this project too. In this case, an EGR block-off plate. My custom tune from FSWerks turns off EGR. The last thing I need is hot air added to the intake charge.

I started with a piece of aluminum. It is actually tread plate. I think it is 16 gauge. I wanted something thick enough to stay flat and not leak, and since the manifold is aluminum, matching materials just seemed like a good idea.



That was just a rough cut. Next, I took the EGR valve itself from the factory intake manifold and used it as a template.



You can see the in the picture below how I traced the outline of the valve mating flange and how the left and right hand snips peel the metal away.



Instead of trying to cut it right in one go, I worked my way up to the line using both the left and right handed snips.



You can see the off cuts on the workbench. Next, I marked and drilled the holes, then deburred all the edges.



The final step was prepping the manifold. Here is the EGR connection on the JRSC manifold.



Just for piece of mind, I smeared the surface with high temp, copper RTV.



Then using a couple of extra coil bracket bolts, I secured the plate.



Took only about 20 minutes start to finish and saved me $20 compared to buying one. Plus, most importantly, I enjoyed doing it. Other than a drill, this is project that can be done entirely with hand tools.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think I screwed up. I put the IAT on the floor of the manifold, which means that water from the injection system will pool in it. So it looks like I will have to take it off.

Oh well. Better to figure that out now than on track when the engine blows because the computer is getting false sensor readings. Thankfully all I need is a simple NPT plug and my mistake will be meaningless.
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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OK, need some help from my fellow Revolutionaries.

Check this out - http://www.ebay.com/itm/2000-2007-Ford-Focus-Custom-Gauge-Pod-Trim-52mm-OEM-Cluster-Bezel-/181081826162?pt=Motors_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item2a29516372&vxp=mtr

I want one that can hold two gauges without sticking out far. Help me by either
A) finding someone who sells it
or
2) telling me you can do it and how much you will charge me

Thanks!
I believe s2inprogress on fj can make you one. PM him.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got one order from s2inprogress. Excellent. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I need some help from the Rally Revolution team here. Where is a good place to pull switched 12v power? Is there a way to add a fuse to the existing panel? I need to power the wideband and since it all goes next to the OBDII plug, the most logical place is the interior fuse panel.

Thanks for the help.
 

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I was pretty sure thy leave extra slots for fuses in most vehicles but I'm not sure
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was pretty sure thy leave extra slots for fuses in most vehicles but I'm not sure
They, do but there is no metal in the hole, so I am not sure how it works.

If anyone can help me with this, even spend ten minutes searching on my behalf, I'd really appreciate it. I have a number of things that I need to wire up and I really don't want to end up with a big rat's nest of wires that looks like shit.
 

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I guess could you be a little more descriptive with what you are doing
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I am just looking to energize a relay with the key. So something has power only when the key is on run.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK, now that I have some time to type, here is the deal. I have a number of items I am going to be adding that all require electricity:
  • WMI pump
  • Gauges
  • Shift light
  • Wideband controller
  • Something else I cannot remember right now but there were 5 items on my list before
I have two possibilities
1) Add fuses to the original panel and power them from there
or
B) Run a small, universal fuse panel that is powered by a relay which is triggered from an existing switched power source

I have wired a racecar from scratch so I know how to do this if I am going from the ground up, but integrating with all the crap that is there already is proving to be a whole lot harder.
 

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Probably not as fun either :/
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Probably not as fun either :/
No, it isn't. It is also really time consuming. Laying out a simple racecar wiring harness is really easy. I have run an EFI car on 5 fuses and two relays! Carb car can be less than that. Easy, easy, easy.

So if anyone either knows or can find this out I'd really appreciate it. I am afraid I don't even know what to search for.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I am going to be using one of these to power the wideband since it doesn't require over 10A. For the WMI system, I am going to get another one, run it as the trigger on a relay, and then go from there. Kind of PITA since it will result in a lot of wires needing to be run, but it is the cleanest solution I have come up with so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
In retrospect, I got a lot accomplished this weekend, even though at times it felt like I was getting nothing done.

Right off the bat, the tone was set for the weekend. I got the 9 pin DIN cable and went to plug it into the SCT. It fit, but barely and if you looked at it funny, it would fall out. Problem was, the plastic sheath wasn't letting the little tabs engage.



Notice how little room metal protrudes. Five seconds with a utility knife and problem solved.



With that done, it was time to get to work on the other end. Since no one makes an adapter, I would have to figure out how to get the bare wires of the Innovate LC-1 to interface with this cable.



Uuuuhhhh, no. Not going to do that. Out came the dykes, off came the end and to work went the multimeter. Apparently there isn't 100% standardization in the color of the wires inside the jacket, so I had to do continuity checks on each one. Happily, my cable followed what was listed as being the most likely configuration.

Then it was time to crimp



and heat shrink



some extensions to the DIN cable wiring. It was tough going for me as the DIN was at most 22 gauge and probably closer to 24. Everything I have is for 22 gauge and larger, so I was on the margins. The Innovate instructions call for soldering which I will not do. Soldering can result in brittle joints and the above method is how all the components I bought from Roush Yates are wired, so it is good enough for me.

With the DIN cable wiring extend and stepped up to a decent gauge, it was time to interface it with the wires on the Innovate. In other words, time for WeatherPack! Female terminal ends to go inside the male connector:



Assembled male connector:



The wires from the wideband controller got the same treatment, except male terminals:



And with the female connector:



Those are the two signal wires. I did a single wire WeatherPack for the ground connection so that I could keep it separate. The Innovate instructions make a big deal about common grounds, so I wanted to be sure I followed them. Of course, they make a big deal of common ground in the instructions, but don't think it is a big enough deal to actually connect the two ground wires together to ensure that you actually use a common ground.

So here was my kitchen table around lunchtime on Saturday:



Once that was done, it was into the garage. The pictures get pretty sparse here because it was really frustrating work. I had to extend the O2 sensor wire because there was no way that I would be able to get the unit away from heat. It ended up here:



Zip tying that still makes me uneasy, but I really have no choice. I also had to run the wires into the cabin.



I managed to get the wiring for the Innovate connections to the SCT to be right next to the OBDII port. This will hopefully making hooking everything up easier.

One of the most frustrating parts of the weekend was the fact that you have to wire in a switch to do the free-air calibration of the sensor and the diagnostic LED. Why these couldn't have been pre-wired I will never know. But I decided to make the best of things and put them in the car where they are out of harm's way.



That was what I got done on Saturday. Late in the day Sunday, I got an add-a-fuse (Cooper-Busman, made in the USA) to power the wideband.



As you can see above, all the wiring is right next to the interior fuse panel, so this was the easy button. One odd thing is that the Innovate instructions say to use "at least a 5 amp fuse". I have never before seen fuses specified as "at least". Should I just run a paper clip in there? That is "at least" 5 amps. I ran a 7½ amp fuse because that is what I had.

Sunday's blower work up next!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OK, part two of what I did over the weekend. On Sunday, my friend Brad showed up to help out. We didn't have a ton of time as watching the Daytona 500 was also on the agenda, but we did get a lot done. Compared to the frustrating electrical crap, Sunday's work was much more in my wheelhouse.

We had to remove the manifold to tap in another hole and modify the support bracket. Every time I drill into the Jackson Racing manifold I am surprised by how thick it is. I guess that is so that it can take the weight of the blower without a problem. The tapping went fine, and with Brad aiming the shop-vac nozzle inside the manifold, it was worry free in terms of chips. I added a T fitting so that I can plug in the boost sensor for the WMI system and plumb the boost gauge. I could have used a simple vacuum T-fitting on an existing line for both, but since the WMI boost sensor is adjustable and doesn't have a gauge, I thought it would be best to have a clean pickup so I could adjust the system accurately. You can see the T-fitting on the left of the manifold:



But the big project was the manifold support bracket. The Jackson Racing kit is really well thought out and includes a bar that goes from the edge of the manifold where it is furthest from the head, down to to the block. This creates a triangle and reduces the leverage the weight of the blower has on the manifold mounting flange. Problem for me is that my oil cooler takeoff blocks the boss on the block that JR used for the rod. So I had to get creative.







I had originally intended to run a second bar on the other side of the bracket, but it interfered with the wiring for the IAT sensor. I am pretty sure that since one bar was enough for the people at Jackson Racing, it will do fine for me. If I find that things are slipping or the bolts are loosening, I will break out the welder and make a new rod that goes to both sides and clears the IAT.

In the middle picture, you can see how close the bracket is to the oil cooler takeoff. I had to re-clock that housing a couple of times. To early and it was rubbing on the driveshaft support bearing. Too late and it was on the manifold support bracket.

Although there was some proper mechanical work, we also had to do some wiring for the divorced IAT. I contemplated getting a six prong WeatherPack connector and making a single male side and two female sides - one for the factory MAF wiring and one for the modified wiring with the divorced IAT. I scratched that idea as soon as I looked under the hood at the wiring cluster. No room. So it was simple butt connectors and heat shrink as shown in the previous wiring post.



You can see the IAT wires hanging out. I added the heat shrink to keep them dry and then covered the whole thing with split loom. The IAT wire was run along with the starter wire, in an area where I have also run the oil cooler lines:



We also got the starter back in, the alternator bracket on (which required wrestling with the oil cooler takeoff again) and a couple of other small items. Then after Brad went home, I was still going full speed, so I decided to mount the alternator and wire it up.



While I had hoped to get the blower installed this weekend so I could do the vacuum and electrical hookups during the week, it didn't happen. So, I decided to fill the space where the blower goes with something equally appealing.



Big boost kit or big boobs kit? Hmmm..... [deviltail]
 

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*scrolling looking a progress*

*sees SI modeling issue*

Fap fap fap fap... I approve of this boost setup
 
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