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Was driving today and get that message on the screen.. and there is no power steering at all...wheel is very hard to turn... woohoo, great
 

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That sucks.....keep us informed on how it goes with the dealer.
 

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Having the steering assist issue and i can't even get out the driveway. Dealership was shocked to hear about it when i called them. Waiting on the place where i bought it to open.
 

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just because your power steering dies doesnt make the car un-drivable its just non powered steering and you have to use some force when turning. Its how all cars where up until 20 or so years ago.
 

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I know how no power steering feels but this is not it. If the light comes on orange then turns red, then you should not drive. That may cause other issues that you may be liable for.
 

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I know how no power steering feels but this is not it. If the light comes on orange then turns red, then you should not drive. That may cause other issues that you may be liable for.
Hey MKC.focus,

I'd like to connect you with your regional customer service manager, who'll work with you and your dealer to come to a resolution. Please send me a PM with your full name, best daytime phone number, VIN, mileage, and servicing dealership.

Todd
 

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just because your power steering dies doesnt make the car un-drivable its just non powered steering and you have to use some force when turning. Its how all cars where up until 20 or so years ago.
Power Steering that isn't working is in NO WAY equivalent to not having power steering to begin with.

Steering can be very difficult, often adequate AT BEST to get to the side of the road in an emergency.

No power steering before the 90's?

Sheesh.
 

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just because your power steering dies doesnt make the car un-drivable its just non powered steering and you have to use some force when turning. Its how all cars where up until 20 or so years ago.
Stupid statement of the century. Manual steering boxes were geared for more of an effort advantage over a power steering box that lost it's hydraulics.

These new electronic steering racks can be an absolute bear to try and turn without assist. I had to drive a Taurus several months back that lost it's electronic power assist and it was probably one of the hardest vehicles I've ever dealt with steering into my bay. I found it to be harder to steer than a Super Duty that lost it's hydraulic power steering and there is no way I would want to drive it on public roads like that.

Anyways KonaBlueHatch, the diagnosis for these new racks are pretty simple. I see you have a 2012....depending on your build date you may have a TSB applied that involves a reprogram of your PSCM. Beyond that, depending on what the diagnosis is, you may very well be getting a complete steering rack ("EPAS steering gear"). I haven't had to replace one yet in a Focus, but I've replaced one in a Taurus and a handful of them in F150s. Let us know what you find out!
 

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Power Steering that isn't working is in NO WAY equivalent to not having power steering to begin with.

Steering can be very difficult, often adequate AT BEST to get to the side of the road in an emergency.

No power steering before the 90's?

Sheesh.
On a few cars. Usually small compacts. My ex wifes 81 Honda Civic had no power steering if I recall. But on such a small car, not hard to steer once the car was in motion. Cars have had (hydraulic) power steering since the 1950's. MECHANICAL power assist pretty much only started to be used in the last 10 years.
 

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just because your power steering dies doesnt make the car un-drivable its just non powered steering and you have to use some force when turning. Its how all cars where up until 20 or so years ago.
That's a safety issue! He could be road killed for that matter! It's a life risk!
 

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I would rather not take a chance on driving any car from this era without the power steering because most of the are all electrical. That is a safety risk that I would not want to put on myself nor my children.
 

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where is the steering assist module located? my car has the steering assist malfunction. my car was involved in a accident where the steering wheel airbag deployed. no damage to steering system. could the airbag have anything to do with the malfunction?
 

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where is the steering assist module located? my car has the steering assist malfunction. my car was involved in a accident where the steering wheel airbag deployed. no damage to steering system. could the airbag have anything to do with the malfunction?
The steering assist mechanism is a rack mounted electric motor so if you've had a front end collision there is a chance the steering rack was damaged.
 

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Thanks for the response, but I have inspected the system and if I'm correct it's all behind the engine on the passenger side. There was no damage to that area. It was a light impact.
 

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Thanks for the response, but I have inspected the system and if I'm correct it's all behind the engine on the passenger side. There was no damage to that area. It was a light impact.
Then inspect the motor and the electrical connector. If it's not working and the car is giving an error either the rack is messed up or it's not getting any power.

In a different thread you said you replaced the wiring harness but it still didn't solve the issue, which leads me to suspect the motor isn't working.

That's all I can see being wrong still, the wiring or the rack itself. Maybe the belt broke for the assist motor, it doesn't require the case getting visibly damaged for the motor to stop.
 

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Might be a belt didn't even think about that. Duh! Brain fart. Does the belt run from the front of the motor to the assist? I've tried getting diagrams of the system but can't find any.
 

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Might be a belt didn't even think about that. Duh! Brain fart. Does the belt run from the front of the motor to the assist? I've tried getting diagrams of the system but can't find any.
The belt is inside the rack housing between the electric motor and the rack. There is no direct mechanical connection between the engine and the assist motor.

EPAS System

The PSCM controls the functions of the EPAS system and communicates with other modules over the High Speed Controller Area Network (HS-CAN).

To activate, the EPAS system needs to be connected to battery voltage at the hot at all times input and at the ignition/run input to the PSCM . In addition, the system must communicate with other modules over the High Speed Controller Area Network (HS-CAN). The PSCM must receive the power mode signal from the BCM in order to be set into operation mode.

The main input for calculating the level of EPAS assist is the torque sensor signal. Vehicle speed is also taken into consideration in order to achieve the vehicle speed dependent steering assist characteristic.

The EPAS gear uses a reversible motor to apply the steering assist. The motor is connected to the rack of the steering gear by a toothed belt and pulley/bearing assembly. The motor is used by the PSCM to move the rack inside the steering gear housing.

The PSCM continually monitors and adjusts steering efforts based on the torque sensor, motor position and High Speed Controller Area Network (HS-CAN) inputs to enhance the feel of the steering system. As vehicle speed increases, the amount of assist decreases to improve and enhance road feel at the steering wheel. As vehicle speed decreases, the amount of assist increases to ease vehicle maneuvering. Compensation is made to reduce the effect of pull or drift that can be experienced when driving on roads with a high degree of camber. Also compensation for the impact of wheel imbalance on steering feel is made up to a predetermined threshold.

The steering torque sensor senses the torque at the steering wheel. It is hard wired to the PSCM and works by measuring the relative rotation between an input and output shaft which are connected by a torsion bar. The torque sensor sends out 2 PWM signals which allows a channel to channel cross-check and an accurate correction of the neutral point.

The PSCM is self-monitoring and is capable of setting and storing Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs). Depending on the DTC set, the PSCM may enter a failure mode. In addition, the PSCM may send a request to the IPC to display a message in the message center, alerting the driver of a potential EPAS concern. The warning message is sent over the High Speed Controller Area Network (HS-CAN) to the BCM where it is converted to a Medium Speed Controller Area Network (MS-CAN) message and forwarded on to the IPC over the Medium Speed Controller Area Network (MS-CAN).

Failure Modes

When a DTC is present in the PSCM , the EPAS enters 1 of 2 modes of operation.

The EPAS enters a reduced steering assist mode to protect the internal components of the EPAS when a concern is detected by the PSCM such as low/high battery voltage or over-temperature concerns that are not considered to be a critical safety concern. This reduced steering assist mode gives the steering a heavier than normal feel.

The EPAS enters a manual steering mode (no electrical steering assistance is provided) when a concern that is considered to be a critical safety concern is detected. In manual steering mode, the vehicle has mechanical steering operation only, which gives steering operation a heavy feel.
Component Description

EPAS Steering Gear

The EPAS gear is an assembly that consists of a PSCM , a motor, a steering shaft torque sensor and EPAS gear isolators, all of which are serviced as an assembly. The inner and outer tie rods and the gear bellows boots are available for service.

The steering shaft torque sensor is mounted near the input shaft of the EPAS gear and is used by the PSCM to determine how much force the steering wheel is being turned by. The steering shaft torque sensor is mounted near the input shaft of the EPAS gear and is used by the PSCM to determine how much force the steering wheel is being turned by.
The EPAS gear has one inner tie rod located at each end of the gear assembly and is available separately for service.
The EPAS gear has one outer tie rod located at each end of the gear assembly and is available separately for service.
The EPAS gear has one bellows boot located at each side of the EPAS gear assembly. Each boot is held in place with 2 boot clamps. The boots and clamps are available for service. The boot kit for service includes an O-ring (not used for producction) that is used between the boot and gear.
The EPAS gear has isolators located at each attachment point of the gear. These isolators (2 rubber and 1 steel) aid in the reduction of NVH concerns and are not available separately for service.
 
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