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Discussion Starter #1
alright just got a set of russell brakelines for my 04 svt and i got em all installed and bleed except for the front driver and rear passenenger.... somehow they keep pushing out air..... ive checked all the connections and their tight as can be. the other two went great and bled the air out quick... these are just being a PITA.

anyone have suggestions other than keep on keepin on[wrenchin] [mad] [rant] [dunno]
 

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Discussion Starter #2
alright... got the wheels on there and took her for aa drive and she stops on a dime... the brakes feel light.... not really spongey imo....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
rubber.... the new brakes feel great.... real light and responsive... slotted rotors and hawk pads r on the way...

i used 2 big bottles on the troublesome lines... everything seems fine and the abs engages perfectly... ill keep and eye out for leaking fluids or lights but so far so good from what i can see
 

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rubber.... the new brakes feel great.... real light and responsive... slotted rotors and hawk pads r on the way...

i used 2 big bottles on the troublesome lines... everything seems fine and the abs engages perfectly... ill keep and eye out for leaking fluids or lights but so far so good from what i can see
Want really good braking? Forget the slotted rotors and go with solid ones. The only thing slots are intended to do are to clean glazed pads. As a result, they also prematurely wear out pads by removing un-glazed pad material with each stop. The correct way to solve a glazing problem is to use proper pad friction formulation so cleaning it continuously is not necessary.
 

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what do you mean by using proper pad friction formulation???
Brake pads and shoes have countless varieties of friction material formulations. For starters, there are the initial groupings of ceramics, organics, carbons, and semi metallics. Then there are many compound formulations within each of those groups. Some are designed for very high operating temps (race pads) while others have very wide operating temperatures (performance street pads).

A race pad is in its element when its very hot. Trying to stop with them when they're cold is very scary as they will not work on that initial push of the pedal. For the street you're looking for something that really bites the first time you use them regardless of temperature. And then if that same street pad continues to bite and resists fade at higher temps all the better.

Also, race pads or really high temp. pads tend to be made up of very aggressive compounds which literally eats the rotor or drum. They are designed to do that to get the maximum coefficient of friction when used for their designed function. For a race car they are considered disposable parts (both pads and rotors) and are budgeted for that way. Few of us have that luxury for a street driven car.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks... makes sense but i never thought about it too much..... will the slotted rotors chew thru pads really quick or will they still have a significant lifespan to them?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
i dunno.... seemed pretty straight forward to me... just unbolt the old lines and install the new ones....
start with the rear passenger then driver front, followed by rear driver to front passenger.

and MAKE SURE TO KEEP THE BRAKE FLUID FULL!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
i know exactly what you mean!!!

ok i started with the rear because they were a lil more complicated... break loose the rubber line to the caliper then move to the other end and disconnect the hose from the metal hardline.... use a screwdriver to pull the clip off the female connecter so u can pull it out of the mount bracket, you sould have some replacement pieces so if they get a lil bent its fine. then unthread the hose from the caliper and replace with the hose that has the rear caliper lable on it... make sure to install the caliper side first to make sure you dont crimp the hose, then put the female side thru the bracket and insert the hardline to the hose and tighten. repeat with the rear frame hose.

http://web.archive.org/web/20070814100048/www.teamfocus.us/brakesystembleeding.htm
theres a link to bleeding the hose lines..... pretty simple, i recommend getting a bleeder kit at kragen or something like that. i recommend refilling the resivior frequently!!! dont wanna refill the whole system... buy extra fluid to make sure u dont run out, if u have any other questions just ask[race]

repeat with the other side and move to the front.
unlike the rear u only have one hose to deal with so its pretty simple... just remove the upper hose connection and then the caliper side and replace with the steel hose. dont worry about the rubber grommet that attaches to the shock because it doesnt reach.

make sure to bleed out all the air in the lines!! take ur time and if u can have a helper especially when bleeding the lines... its a PITA to do that step urself.

i hope that helps and if theres info from anyone else please chime in
 

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there was an article i read about stainless lines on street cars, and after reading that, i would never, ever, ever do stainless lines

plus, the rubber lines work just fine
 

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Discussion Starter #19
http://www.nsxprime.com/wiki/Brake_Lines
just found this online... pretty interesting stuff..... gonna make sure to check mine regularly.... the russell lines have a pretty good set up by the look of things... the steel braids are enclosed by outer rubber and the endlinks have another thicker layer at the connecting points.... but yea definetly makes you think about getting them....
 

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I think the most important part about your hose's is this

They've traditionally been made from rubber tubing, with steel or aluminum connectors crimped onto their ends. Nearly all passenger cars are shipped with rubber brake lines, and they hardly ever fail.

"Stainless-steel" lines are made of Teflon tubing, not rubber. Teflon has a number of advantages over rubber; the chief ones are that it doesn't expand under pressure and it doesn't deteriorate with age. It also resists high temperatures and is chemically inert, so it's compatible with all brake fluids.

However, Teflon is pretty fragile, so it has to be protected from physical damage (chafing, flying rocks, etc.). Although some manufacturers armor their Teflon hoses with Kevlar, most protect the Teflon with an external sheath of braided stainless-steel wire... So that's why armored Teflon hose is usually called "stainless-steel hose". There's no such thing as a stainless-steel brake line that's "not lined with any material"; ALL stainless-steel brake lines are really Teflon lines with a protective stainless-steel-braid cover.

The ends of the hoses have to be securely attached to the brake calipers and the hard lines, so each hose is terminated by threaded hose-ends.

Those hose-end fittings can be attached to the hoses a couple of ways.

The cheap way is to crimp or swage them onto the hoses, like the fittings on rubber hoses. The more-expensive way is to use a two-piece replaceable hose end that captures a portion of the hose between an inner nipple and a concentric outer socket. These hose-ends (often referred to generically as "Aeroquip fittings" because they were invented by the Aeroquip Corporation) are used EVERYWHERE on aircraft and race cars.
Ok... So what's required for a stainless-steel brake line to be DOT-approved?

First, I should point out that there may be lines available that meet all the DOT specs, but are non-approved only because they haven't been submitted to the DOT for approval.

Manufacturers can't legally say that their lines are approved -- even if they KNOW that the lines meet all the DOT specifications -- without actually submittimg them to the DOT.

For that reason, stainless-steel brake lines can fall into three categories:

"DOT approved" - These lines have been submitted to and approved by the US Department of Transportation.

"non-approved" - These lines don't have a DOT approval, either because they don't meet the specs or simply because they haven't been submitted for testing.

"non-conforming" - These lines are non-approved (and non-approvable) because they fail to meet the DOT specs.
 
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