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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to install stainless steel brake lines on all four corners of an '04 SVT. I'm guessing its a messy procedure. When I remove the line from the caliper, as well as from the hard metal lines, I'm assuming the fluid will start running out and I need a catch can for it, right? Or does the vacuum in the reservoir/master cylinder hold most of it back? I do plan to completely bleed and flush when everything is hooked back up.
 

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Yes, fluid will leak out. If you are going to change the brake lines, start with the farthest away from the master clyinder. Get a catch can and place it under the caliper. I would get a small piece of air hose like from an aquarium and place it on the end of the bleeder valve. Run the line into the catch can and open the bleeder valve about 1/2 turn. Go into the car and pump the brakes to help speed the process of draining the lines. Once the fluid stops flowing out, close the bleeder valve and go to the next farthest caliper. Open the next bleeder valve and pump the brake pedal until the fluid stops flowing out and tighten the bleeder valve back. Repeat this process until all calipers have been done.

The first caliper will drain out most of the fluid, but there will still be some in the lines to the other calipers. That's why you have to repeat the process on each caliper. Once this is done, almost all of the brake fluid will be evacuated from the system. You can begin replacing the brake lines at this point, but be aware there will still be a little fluid in the lines that you won't be able to fully get out. Keep that catch can ready as you loosen and remove those flex lines.

After installing the new lines (don't forget the tape on the threads), you'll need to fill the reservoir and bleed the air bubbles out of the lines. Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. Yes, I've bled my share of brake lines, both on cars and bikes, and have the FocusSport bleeder bottle (http://www.focussport.com/brakebleeder.htm) to help with the chore. Looks better than the MityVac. My main concern was how much fluid I'd put on the garage floor when I pulled the various lines.
 

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Yes, fluid will leak out. If you are going to change the brake lines, start with the farthest away from the master clyinder. Get a catch can and place it under the caliper. I would get a small piece of air hose like from an aquarium and place it on the end of the bleeder valve. Run the line into the catch can and open the bleeder valve about 1/2 turn. Go into the car and pump the brakes to help speed the process of draining the lines. Once the fluid stops flowing out, close the bleeder valve and go to the next farthest caliper. Open the next bleeder valve and pump the brake pedal until the fluid stops flowing out and tighten the bleeder valve back. Repeat this process until all calipers have been done.

The first caliper will drain out most of the fluid, but there will still be some in the lines to the other calipers. That's why you have to repeat the process on each caliper. Once this is done, almost all of the brake fluid will be evacuated from the system. You can begin replacing the brake lines at this point, but be aware there will still be a little fluid in the lines that you won't be able to fully get out. Keep that catch can ready as you loosen and remove those flex lines.

After installing the new lines (don't forget the tape on the threads), you'll need to fill the reservoir and bleed the air bubbles out of the lines. Hope that helps.
I'd offer this clarification....replace the lines in any order that you want. Vacating the lines is not really necessary. I do suggest removing as much fluid from the reservoir as possible as this will minimize gravity bleeding (use a turkey baster, a vacuum or hand pump, or bleed it out the first line you work on by any traditional method. Once done, then bleed them starting with the caliper furthest from the master cylinder.
 

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Any word on swapping the old fluid for new? I already have my SS lines. I did that when I swapped to SVT brakes. However its time for new fluid.
 

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Any word on swapping the old fluid for new? I already have my SS lines. I did that when I swapped to SVT brakes. However its time for new fluid.
What info are you looking for? Bleeding is pretty easy and straight forward and I'm assuming you're familiar with the procedure with you did all that prior work. I suggest either Castrol LMA or Valvoline synthetic fluid. Both are cheap, readily available, and have low moisture absorption properties as well as reasonable wet operating temperatures (dry temps mean little except for fresh fluid used for racing).
 

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Well what i'm asking is do I just bleed the brakes until all I have is new fluid or is there an easier way to get rid of the old then put in the new?

P.S. Sorry if it seems like i'm jacking your thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'd offer this clarification....replace the lines in any order that you want. Vacating the lines is not really necessary. I do suggest removing as much fluid from the reservoir as possible as this will minimize gravity bleeding.
Would a relatively empty reservoir cause the ABS pump to get air? I've heard that its a pain to bleed.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Well what i'm asking is do I just bleed the brakes until all I have is new fluid or is there an easier way to get rid of the old then put in the new?

P.S. Sorry if it seems like i'm jacking your thread.
You're best bet is to draw as much 'old' fluid out of the reservoir as possible before bleeding (using a MityVac or turkey baster). Don't drain it completely, or you'll have air in your fluid.

Fill the reservoir with new fluid and begin bleeding. This way ensures that you aren't pumping a lot of the old through the system.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
A MityVac is a hand-held suction pump that creates a vacuum to pull fluid thrrough the system. You attach it to your bleeder nipple. It works fairly well, but sometimes the connection at the nipple isn't tight and it makes you think you have air in the line, when in reality you don't. Downside is that it has a fairly small reservoir for holding old fluid, so you constantly have to stop, disconnect and empty the reservoir (which can be messy).

UPDATE: My attempts at landing Russell lines has failed, as my local vednoprs can't get the correct part from the warehouse for at least 14 days. So, I've ordered the set offered by BAT, Inc. Slightly higher in price, but they contain the rubber bushings for attaching the hose to the spindles, etc. Also, my one-man bleeder arrived today from FocusSport. Things are starting to come together.
 

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Yeah I got my lines from CFM. Although I don't have teh rubber things to attach the fronts to the struts. However no problems so far.
 
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