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Since the DCT has been described as an "automated manual" and not a traditional slushbox w/ converter? I'd love some feedback with the following questions (I have a SelectShift DCT):

-any problems/long term concerns if I always operate it in Sport mode and use the toggle to shift, as if I had paddle shifters?

-I'd always been told that I couldn't coast in neutral (long distance, at speed)with a traditional automatic - screws up the synchros. Can I do this with a DCT? (I daily travel up/down long hills, and if I had a manual I'd eliminate the engine braking and throw it into N downhill, and back into gear at the appropriate time).

-if I'm at speed gliding in neutral & throw it back in gear (with an blip on the throttle to give the motor some RPM's to blend the shift), will the PCM sense the car's speed and put it back into gear in an appropriate gear (in other words, not into 1st/2nd if the car is at 65 mph).

Thanks in advance for your help and feedback.
 

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My 14 SE does not have select shift. There is no way to manually shift the transmission.

So far I have not had any constant issues with the DCT. It hiccups sometimes but generally it works fine with my driving style. My commute includes about 25 miles of twisting mountain roads and a freeway slog.
 

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Since the DCT has been described as an "automated manual" and not a traditional slushbox w/ converter? I'd love some feedback with the following questions (I have a SelectShift DCT):

-any problems/long term concerns if I always operate it in Sport mode and use the toggle to shift, as if I had paddle shifters?

-I'd always been told that I couldn't coast in neutral (long distance, at speed)with a traditional automatic - screws up the synchros. Can I do this with a DCT? (I daily travel up/down long hills, and if I had a manual I'd eliminate the engine braking and throw it into N downhill, and back into gear at the appropriate time).

-if I'm at speed gliding in neutral & throw it back in gear (with an blip on the throttle to give the motor some RPM's to blend the shift), will the PCM sense the car's speed and put it back into gear in an appropriate gear (in other words, not into 1st/2nd if the car is at 65 mph).

Thanks in advance for your help and feedback.
Traditional (torque converter?) automatic transmissions have synchronizers?
 

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Traditional (torque converter?) automatic transmissions have synchronizers?
What is known now as the traditional automatic transmission with torque converter uses brake bands and planetary gear sets to engage drive to the wheels, there are no synchronizers on this type of transmission.
 

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I drive mine like a manual except during my daily commute with traffic. Drive seems to do some sort of smoothing to the throttle input because it's much smoother in low speed while staying in 1st gear compared to you shifting yourself in Sport Manual mode.



The main quirk is that the timing of 3-2-1 downshifts is important. Downshift to 2 while your RPMs are too high, and you'll hear it and possibly feel a thud (improper rev matching?) I have no idea about long-term durability of the DCT when driven in Sport Manual.



I'm not sure about shifting into neutral, but I believe that the Focus is very well optimized to cut off the throttle going downhill so that it's actually better to leave the clutch in and just coast. Never tried throwing it into neutral though. Unlike with a conventional automatic, you can't even shift into Neutral without pressing the button on the side.
 

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It pretty much automatically puts it neutral when you coast, it's well documented... I wouldn't bother manually going from D to N and back, sounds like more wear and tear than needed when it really does it by itself.
 

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It pretty much automatically puts it neutral when you coast, it's well documented...
Since when does this happen? If this is happening with your vehicle, it needs to be serviced.

It should remain in gear while in drive, unless you are stopped. If the engine is idling while coasting then your gearbox is not operating as intended.
 

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Since when does this happen? If this is happening with your vehicle, it needs to be serviced.

It should remain in gear while in drive, unless you are stopped. If the engine is idling while coasting then your gearbox is not operating as intended.
OK, I did say it completely wrong, sorry... The RPM's don't drop to idle speed but it uses almost zero gas when you are coasting/off the throttle completely... it will allow plenty of roll as well, even if the RPM's don't drop all the way... I forget how it's described, but I don't see why anyone would want to put it neutral when keeping it in gear does not use any more gas and keeps some engine power for traction.
 

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Going downhill the ecu senses that gravity is going to keep the engine turning so it cuts fuel. I think that's it anyway.
 

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Having just taught myself how to drive a 5-speed, I can't see how "driving it like a manual" is true. When I get in my Focus after driving the manual car, its a completely different feeling. Maybe its just me....
 

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Ryan - the original "drive it like a manual" advice here came out with the first '12's, when "less than smooth" (grin) operation was noted when a lot of driving is done BELOW 1st gear engagement speed heating up the clutch & calling for a lot of engagement/disengagement cycles that wont be smooth.

Later it also was used to refer to being more consistent in throttle use, avoiding a lot of indecisive on & off movements that can "confuse" the shifting. One of the common examples was taking off from a stop, then backing off to start a turn, followed by getting back on the throttle in the turn, and backing off again when that didn't feel smooth - then jumping back on as the turn completes.

Think of slipping it all the time instead of completing the engagement into first for the low speed part, and trying to pop back & forth between gears for the second version.
 

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Ryan - the original "drive it like a manual" advice here came out with the first '12's, when "less than smooth" (grin) operation was noted when a lot of driving is done BELOW 1st gear engagement speed heating up the clutch & calling for a lot of engagement/disengagement cycles that wont be smooth.

Later it also was used to refer to being more consistent in throttle use, avoiding a lot of indecisive on & off movements that can "confuse" the shifting. One of the common examples was taking off from a stop, then backing off to start a turn, followed by getting back on the throttle in the turn, and backing off again when that didn't feel smooth - then jumping back on as the turn completes.

Think of slipping it all the time instead of completing the engagement into first for the low speed part, and trying to pop back & forth between gears for the second version.
Well said... It's definitely mostly about throttle application, use the throttle like you would in a manual to avoid bucking/jerking, not really the whole car in general.
 

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Oh OK. That part makes more sense. I've definitely noticed its jerkier if you try to feather the throttle
 

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Oh OK. That part makes more sense. I've definitely noticed its jerkier if you try to feather the throttle
If you mean when you are going on and off the throttle too quickly then ya... You can give it light throttle, just try to be consistent to where you can stay on it longer than a split second at a time.
 
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