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A SLUMBER did my spirit seal;


A SLUMBER did my spirit seal;
I had no human fears:
She seemed a thing that could not feel
The touch of earthly years.

No motion has she now, no force;
She neither hears nor sees;
Rolled round in earth's diurnal course,
With rocks, and stones, and trees

Working Bibliography


http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0857259.html

http://www.bookrags.com/essay-2005/5/7/85217/42181

http://www.bookrags.com/essay-2005/3/8/211653/6934

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/41735/the_canterbury_tales.html
 

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http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/LitNote/id-52.html

Brown
English 12 Advanced
27 February 2007
Characterization in the Canterbury Tales
Without characterization, The Canterbury Tales is nothing. Chaucer built this entire work on the characters, and the tales they told. The characters in this work are vital to its success, but the way they are built is what is intriguing and is what people have been talking about for the six hundred and twenty years since Chaucer finished this masterpiece; considered to be his best work, wrapping up an amazing seventeen-thousand total lines. (Info please) "'The poem introduces a group of pilgrims journeying from London to the shrine of St. Thomas à Becket at Canterbury. To help pass the time they decide to tell stories. Together, the pilgrims represent a wide cross section of 14th-century English life." (Info please) Each character has a different tale and provides an essential component to the total success of this poem, without these amazing descriptions Chaucer gave us, this poem would all but disappeared off the face of the earth with time.
Chaucer starts with the Knight in the prologue. (123helpme) The Knight is the highest ranked, among social classes, in the poem. (Cliff notes) "'He is the epitome of gentility, a man who loves truth, freedom, and honor. Everyone in the pilgrimage looks up to and respects him.'' (Cliff notes) Chaucer may have started with the Knight to, one might say, "set the bar high'', for all the other pilgrims of this journey, because he is the most respected and highest ranked person in this poem. The Knight is explained best in this quote: ''There was a Knight, a most distinguished man, who from the day on which he first began, to ride abroad had followed chivalry, truth, honor, generousness, and courtesy. He had done nobly in his sovereign's war."(Lines 43-47) Also significantly noted about the Knight, is his gentility, and humility. (Cliff notes).
The Squire, an apparently young and lusty bachelor, is also a character Chaucer displayed his characterization in. (123helpme)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Jason Pohl
Brown
English 12 Advanced
27 February 2007
Characterization in the Canterbury Tales
Without characterization, The Canterbury Tales is nothing. Chaucer built this entire work on the characters, and the tales they told. The characters in this work are vital to its success, but the way they are built is what is intriguing and is what people have been talking about for the six hundred and twenty years since Chaucer finished this masterpiece; considered to be his best work, wrapping up an amazing seventeen-thousand total lines. (Info please) "'The poem introduces a group of pilgrims journeying from London to the shrine of St. Thomas à Becket at Canterbury. To help pass the time they decide to tell stories. Together, the pilgrims represent a wide cross section of 14th-century English life." (Info please) Each character has a different tale and provides an essential component to the total success of this poem, without these amazing descriptions Chaucer gave us, this poem would all but disappeared off the face of the earth with time.
Chaucer starts with the Knight in the prologue. (123helpme) The Knight is the highest ranked, among social classes, in the poem. (Cliff notes) "'He is the epitome of gentility, a man who loves truth, freedom, and honor. Everyone in the pilgrimage looks up to and respects him.'' (Cliff notes) Chaucer may have started with the Knight to, one might say, "set the bar high'', for all the other pilgrims of this journey, because he is the most respected and highest ranked person in this poem. The Knight is explained best in this quote: ''There was a Knight, a most distinguished man, who from the day on which he first began, to ride abroad had followed chivalry, truth, honor, generousness, and courtesy. He had done nobly in his sovereign's war."(Lines 43-47) Also significantly noted about the Knight, is his gentility, and humility. (Cliff notes).
The Squire, an apparently young and lusty bachelor, is also a character Chaucer displayed his characterization in. (123helpme) As the Knights son, one might speculate that he has some of his father's attributes. Do not be quick to judge though; the squire is characterized in a way to represent something very different from his father. He is much more interested in fighting for a woman, than the God that the Knight was fighting for in the Crusades. (123helpme) Today, he is compared as the most modern man of the group of twenty-nice pilgrims. (123helpme)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Jason Pohl
Brown
English 12 Advanced
27 February 2007
Characterization in the Canterbury Tales
Without characterization, The Canterbury Tales is nothing. Chaucer built this entire work on the characters, and the tales they told. The characters in this work are vital to its success, but the way they are built is what is intriguing and is what people have been talking about for the six hundred and twenty years since Chaucer finished this masterpiece; considered to be his best work, wrapping up an amazing seventeen-thousand total lines. (Info please) "'The poem introduces a group of pilgrims journeying from London to the shrine of St. Thomas à Becket at Canterbury. To help pass the time they decide to tell stories. Together, the pilgrims represent a wide cross section of 14th-century English life." (Info please) Each character has a different tale and provides an essential component to the total success of this poem, without these amazing descriptions Chaucer gave us, this poem would all but disappeared off the face of the earth with time.
Chaucer starts with the Knight in the prologue. (123helpme) The Knight is the highest ranked, among social classes, in the poem. (Cliff notes) "'He is the epitome of gentility, a man who loves truth, freedom, and honor. Everyone in the pilgrimage looks up to and respects him.'' (Cliff notes) Chaucer may have started with the Knight to, one might say, "set the bar high'', for all the other pilgrims of this journey, because he is the most respected and highest ranked person in this poem. The Knight is explained best in this quote: ''There was a Knight, a most distinguished man, who from the day on which he first began, to ride abroad had followed chivalry, truth, honor, generousness, and courtesy. He had done nobly in his sovereign's war."(Lines 43-47) Also significantly noted about the Knight, is his gentility, and humility. (Cliff notes).
The Squire, an apparently young and lusty bachelor, is also a character Chaucer displayed his characterization in. (123helpme) As the Knights son, one might speculate that he has some of his father's attributes. Do not be quick to judge though; the squire is characterized in a way to represent something very different from his father. He is much more interested in fighting for a woman, than the God that the Knight was fighting for in the Crusades. (123helpme) Today, he is compared as the most modern man of the group of twenty-nice pilgrims. (123helpme)
 

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boy, everyone is jumping on this hread, LOL
 
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