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Discussion Starter #1
When I bought my car the brakes grabbed hard so I took them in to the Ford Dealership to be fixed, they told me that the brakes and rotors looked fine they did mention some surface rust due to it sitting on the lot so they resurfaced the rotors my paper said they cut them and scuffed them, well afterwards it now makes a loud humming/whirling sound when I stop, I had a mechanic drive my car and of course he didn’t hear the sound. But this morning once again I hear it. I called back and they told me it’s normal to hear this sound for a little while after having a rotor resurfaced is this true, how long until it goes away etc.
 

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They might have left too rough of a finish on the rotor surface. I had this happen to me once and I took them back to be resurfaced again as the sound was NOT going away (basically had them touched up) and they were fine afterwards. I wouldn't put up with it for more than a couple days - steel is really hard compared to brake pad material. As of late, I've had good luck finding really cheap rotors when it comes time to replace or resurface them so I have't bothered with resurfacing.
 

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If they do not keep the tool cutting tip sharp it can cut a crap cut that makes noise. I used to cut discs and never had any noise trouble as long as the tip was in good shape. Vibration control that makes noise cutting them is often a problem too, nobody ever keeps enough vibration control methods in place and cutting without it if the disc configuration does not lend itself to your methods then can make a crap cut even with the correct tool. Vibration MUST be controlled as the machines are otherwise too flimsy to really hold a disc in firm place, they will vibrate the part due to the long moment the disc and cutting tool are held at on the machine.

'...steel is really hard compared to brake pad material.'

Not necessarily if the pad is semi-metallic to the max extent like many cheap crap pads are if you are not picky and pick the cheapos. Semi-metallic and the cast iron disc (rarely is it steel unless a custom part) are so close in hardness they fight and each can cross-deposit material from the one to the other and common, why a cut can make the brakes work much better. Also why since the cars dropped asbestos to force most going to semi-metallic suddenly the discs no longer live forever, they wear about as fast as the pads do now and why you change them commonly when you used to never change discs over the entire life of a car back in the old days. The equal wear thing is proof they are about the same hardness.
 

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I only use ceramic because I don't like the dust and they keep your wheels cleaner. Never noticed much wear on the rotors with them either - they seem to last forever. Last time I replaced the rotors, it was because the mechanic was saying they were causing some mystery noise but turned out he was wrong. They still had plenty of thickness and didn't have any warpage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If they do not keep the tool cutting tip sharp it can cut a crap cut that makes noise. I used to cut discs and never had any noise trouble as long as the tip was in good shape. Vibration control that makes noise cutting them is often a problem too, nobody ever keeps enough vibration control methods in place and cutting without it if the disc configuration does not lend itself to your methods then can make a crap cut even with the correct tool. Vibration MUST be controlled as the machines are otherwise too flimsy to really hold a disc in firm place, they will vibrate the part due to the long moment the disc and cutting tool are held at on the machine.

'...steel is really hard compared to brake pad material.'

Not necessarily if the pad is semi-metallic to the max extent like many cheap crap pads are if you are not picky and pick the cheapos. Semi-metallic and the cast iron disc (rarely is it steel unless a custom part) are so close in hardness they fight and each can cross-deposit material from the one to the other and common, why a cut can make the brakes work much better. Also why since the cars dropped asbestos to force most going to semi-metallic suddenly the discs no longer live forever, they wear about as fast as the pads do now and why you change them commonly when you used to never change discs over the entire life of a car back in the old days. The equal wear thing is proof they are about the same hardness.
So what do you think I should do, is it safe to continue driving until I can afford to replace rotors and brakes, I was told my brakes are in great shape that rotor noise just bothers me
 

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Did you take them back, demanding that they resurface them properly? You've already paid for the work once and shouldn't have to again.

For future reference, disc brakes are one of the easiest things for a DIYer to work on yet dealers/mechanics charge a lot to do them. Normally just a flat fee for something that takes them 15 minutes a corner. You only need a few basic tools to do it as well and there are plenty of step by step videos online to guide you through the process.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Did you take them back, demanding that they resurface them properly? You've already paid for the work once and shouldn't have to again.

For future reference, disc brakes are one of the easiest things for a DIYer to work on yet dealers/mechanics charge a lot to do them. Normally just a flat fee for something that takes them 15 minutes a corner. You only need a few basic tools to do it as well and there are plenty of step by step videos online to guide you through the process.
No I didn’t, they did it for free since I just bought the car and they refuse to see a problem with it, they said the rotors and brakes are now fine and they test drove it and didn’t find any issues
 

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Personally I like brakes that grab. You just have to learn to modulate the brake pedal better.
The brake pad would have removed all of the rust fairly soon. Turning the rotors again is not going to do anything. You need new brake pads that can actually make a relationship with the rotor. Old brake pads are not going to do that.
Yes your brakes are safe.

Not trying to be rude but you bought a 15 year old car you are expecting too much.
When my brother bought his 2005 it was 7 years old. We had to put a starter on it some fluid changes, and new front brakes was he upset no.

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
 

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Did you take them back, demanding that they resurface them properly? You've already paid for the work once and shouldn't have to again.

For future reference, disc brakes are one of the easiest things for a DIYer to work on yet dealers/mechanics charge a lot to do them. Normally just a flat fee for something that takes them 15 minutes a corner. You only need a few basic tools to do it as well and there are plenty of step by step videos online to guide you through the process.
I worked at a shop we spent more than 15 minutes per side everything was cleaned and lubricated. With a proper brake job all the hardware should be cleaned and lubricated. I also do a brake fluid flush anytime I do brakes. I don't like the idea of pushing dirty brake fluid backwards through the ABS system.

Sent from my LG-LS997 using Tapatalk
 

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I worked at a shop we spent more than 15 minutes per side everything was cleaned and lubricated. With a proper brake job all the hardware should be cleaned and lubricated. I also do a brake fluid flush anytime I do brakes. I don't like the idea of pushing dirty brake fluid backwards through the ABS system.

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A shop that my company uses to service their fleet vehicles charges an extra fee (on top of a pretty healthy price) just to clean and lube the slider pins. I do that on every brake job but I don't go to the trouble of flushing fluid every time. I don't go through the trouble of flushing brake fluid each time I service the brakes (and I don't think most shops would do this without an additional fee) but I do replace the fluid from time to time to make sure it is fresh and clean. 30K miles is a good interval for brake fluid flushing so if your pads are lasting that long, it would be a good time to do that while you have the wheels off.
 

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My rotors wore down to the point that I had to replace them. I took a shot with some $40 rotors on eBay that included ceramic pads. I am perfectly happy with them. They had "Callahan" as the brand on the literature, but there is no such brand that I could find. Anyway, like I said, they are working fine. I just checked eBay and they are still there for $37.37.
Rust on the rotors is normal after a car sits outside for awhile. It will be removed with the first stop. I have never had surface rust cause any issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My rotors wore down to the point that I had to replace them. I took a shot with some $40 rotors on eBay that included ceramic pads. I am perfectly happy with them. They had "Callahan" as the brand on the literature, but there is no such brand that I could find. Anyway, like I said, they are working fine. I just checked eBay and they are still there for $37.37.
Rust on the rotors is normal after a car sits outside for awhile. It will be removed with the first stop. I have never had surface rust cause any issues.
I drove mine for 2 weeks and they said it had surface rust still so they resurfaced them
 

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Your brakes are fine.
Many cars have some brake noise, particularly with freshly turned rotors.
It's not a safety issue, and will probably continue to get less and less as your rotors and pads bed in.

I installed slotted rotors on my Focus, and they produce a pronounced hum under braking, that decreases with speed.
Since I know what it is, it doesn't bug me, but when I have a passenger they often ask about it. LOL
They do bite better, particularly in the wet, as the slots squeegee out the water more quickly.

BTW, with race brakes, it's actually best to bed in new pads on used rotors, and vice versa.
 

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When I bought my car the brakes grabbed hard so I took them in to the Ford Dealership to be fixed, they told me that the brakes and rotors looked fine they did mention some surface rust due to it sitting on the lot so they resurfaced the rotors my paper said they cut them and scuffed them,Showbox jiofi.local.html tplinklogin well afterwards it now makes a loud humming/whirling sound when I stop, I had a mechanic drive my car and of course he didn’t hear the sound. But this morning once again I hear it. I called back and they told me it’s normal to hear this sound for a little while after having a rotor resurfaced is this true, how long until it goes away etc.
I am perfectly happy with them. They had "Callahan" as the brand on the literature, but there is no such brand that I could find. Anyway, like I said, they are working fine. I just checked eBay and they are still there for $37.37.
 
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