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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Is there a way through this forum to get access to Ford Focus TSB's? I am looking for one in particular: 05105. The TSB is for squealing rear drum brakes.
Thank you

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi
Thank you for this. Are there additional pages? It is difficult for me to follow the instructions. They appear to be cut off.
TSB 07-14-4 just shows page 9.
TSB 05-10-5 just shows page 6.

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Well i tried and can’t get it to let me move the page it’s on a secure site for techs only so I was only able to get those pics


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Either of those fixes do not work well. The second can work better, but it can wear off to again make noise.

The easiest way to fix all noise is to knock off the right angle ends of the brake shoes similar to what disc brake pads do. Make it gradual enough and 100% of all noise stops. Did it to both of mine and not a peep out of them since (we're now talking years!) and using the same shoes that before made hideous noise at slow roll traffic jams.

The shoes must remove and using a bench grinder grind an angle at the shoe end about 3/4" long, it must be gradual enough to kill the corner there and for a long way into the shoe, you don't want the noise coming back 2 years later.

The first TSB only addresses the result not the cause, the second fix can wear off to again make noise. My cars began to make noise again about 6 months after that second fix was done. Hence fix #3.

The actual cause of the noise is the right angle end of the shoe, at slow roll it can dig in to then pop loose after a bit and then do it again and again, the thousands of times it does it at slow roll then amplify through the brake assembly to make the squeal. Brakes do it now because the shoe material is much harder due to the removal of asbestos. The closer the drum and shoe get to being the same hardness the more noise they make, the backing plate adds to it too due to being too thin. Why the first TSB addresses that, but the weights are really a stupid way to do that, they come off pretty easy. The second fix works until the grease wears off and the shoes then contact the backing plate to make noise again, the 6 months.

When there is no corner at the end of shoe then it cannot dig in enough to hold momentarily to make the noise, the angle is gradual enough it cannot dig in.

Go to a parts store and have them pull out any more expensive disc pad set and look close at the angles on the ends of the pads and why they do that. Then apply that idea to the brake shoes, it works the same way. Some who still had a bit of noise after did not relieve the shoe in a long enough angle, those will still try to make noise.

Do it right and no noise ever again, I take mine all the way down close to the backing steel to make sure they never do it again.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I wanted to follow up a bit on this. I haven't done any repairs, as I'm still figuring out what to do.

The second TSB for this issue, 07-14-4, looks to me like it is simply buying entirely new rear brake parts.

1) 6S4Z-2200-B Brake Shoe and Lining
2) 6S4Z-2261-AA Cylinder Assembly
3) 8S4Z-1113-A Hub and Drum Assembly

However, 8S4Z-1113-A (Hub and Drum Assmelby) is discontinued. It was replaced by 8S4Z-1113-B, but that too was discontinued.

https://www.fordpartsgiant.com/parts/ford-hub-and-drum-assy-wheel_8s4z-1113-a.html
https://www.fordpartsgiant.com/parts/ford-hub-and-drum-asy-w_8s4z-1113-b.html

It looks like the Hub/Drum that is a big part of the fix for this TSB is discontinued.
Does that mean that this TSB is useless? Or can I still use that discontinued drum and be ok?
 

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Better off doing the angle ¾” long trim on the brake shoes.
I do the angle trim on most brake shoes I install. It’s just a good practice to keep the chatter/squealing noise away.
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That & actually using the Parking brake every time you park. Using the parking brake every time keeps the shoes adjusted close to the drum like they should be.
 

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Not on these, they auto-adjust every time you simply push the brake pedal down in normal use. Provided the sprung quadrants are loose and rotating like they should be. The teeth are extremely small and why they are, they adjust far more due to that than the oldschool 1/16" spaced starwheel teeth ever did. You must chase the cleanliness of the grooves though as they are so small they clog with crap and the the current adjustment slips back to an older one. Meaning more loose. ALWAYS clean those grooves when the brakes are apart.

You can make the chased setting closer, I do by using a paper clip as a wire thickness gauge to close up the hook end that the adjuster bar between the shoes hits. Closing that distance up to the bar makes the adjustment closer.

There is absolutely nothing in the drums that fixes the noise issue, they are cast iron or steel which WILL make noise. Ford just using the TSBs to cycle more parts out and what they do. The dealer gets paid for it. Wasted parts like so many of them are.

One gets this or they don't. The semi-metallic parts used now make noise with the drums or the discs as they are too close now to the same material hardness. Try running steel on steel and see if it does not make noise and impossible. Like hardness materials seize when run on each other and why plain type bearings are soft and the running surface against them is hard. The asbestos used to do that but it is gone. What walnut shells and other trash in the pad or shoe material is for but it is not hardy enough to stop noise.

Why virtually ALL disc pads except the cheapest crap ones now have those angles on the ends and why the idea works just as well on the shoes too.

Just did my Nissan rear drums for noise backing up in reverse, the problem is now gone. Still using the same shoes and drums too. And there ain't no TSB on those at all.

Do that angle cut correctly and the noise is gone for the entire life of the brakes.

Of course, one can monkey around with things until the end of the planet and not change anything and what those TSBs do.
 

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When I am in there. It does get cleaned. But will make a mental note about cleaning those detent teeth.
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Using the parking brake every time, came from driving a manual early in my driving learning curve. I see it as a good thing. Like manual-transmissions, it’s good for throwing millennials off their game.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
sanding the brake shoe lining ends

amc49,
I do see what you are saying. Your method does sound like the best way. I honestly don't know that much about cars, so I need to follow up each possibility to figure things out.
I attached two pictures to illustrate my understanding of what you are saying. The first is a generic picture of a brake shoe that I found on the web. In the second picture, I put in a simple black line on each end of the shoe. Those little black lines are my understanding of what you mean by sanding down the ends of the lining on the brake shoe to remove the right angle.
Do I have the basic idea right?
Thank you for your time helping with this.
 

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You have the right idea but the angle is too short. It needs to be at least 3/4" in length to really lower the end angle. You are only showing maybe 1/4" there. The longer the angle gets the further away from 90 degrees the end gets and that is the key. You are showing maybe 45 degree angle there, it needs to be down around 20-25 degrees. The lower the better. That is what stops the end of shoe from digging into the drum to start the whole mess.

Yes, it appears to shorten the shoe swept area but I've found no difference at all in the stopping power.

Do BOTH ends of each shoe as the forces reverse when you back up and then it makes noise too especially in high humidity. If you have the one thin thickness shoe on back obviously that one will not have as long an angle as the front shoe, the lining is too thin to support that. Some linings though make the back thick and it is just a shorter lining. Those get the same treatment as they are as thick as the fronts.
 
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