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Discussion Starter #1
First of all, I assume that if you're replacing the seals, you're replacing your CV axles. Also, you should try to keep at least one of the old seals fairly intact.

The seal part number is BRS-46.

To get the old seals out, go to your local auto parts store and do a rent-a-tool on a slide hammer. I got mine from Advance Auto. I used one of the 3-way hooks to pry on the seal (not attaching it to the slide hammer). I also used the longest hook, on the slide hammer, to pull the seal out.

Slather some grease on the outside of the new seal; it can't hurt anything, as long as you keep it clean. If it's a really hot day, you might try sticking it in the freezer for a couple of hours.

Remove the C-clip from the old axle. Take the old seal and put it on the old axle backward (larger side facing the transmission). Put the new seal on the transmission as best you can. Take the axle and put it in the transmission, sliding it in as far as possible.

Try not to let the axle slide in and out of the transmission. There's enough play in the CV joints to achieve something of a hammering effect. Hammer at it for about 5 minutes or so. You won't get it in all the way, but that's okay.

To finish the job, take a piece of wood, about 1 inch x 3 inches x 4 feet (longer is okay), wrap the end in a plastic bag, and hold that FLAT against the seal. Hammer, rotate the wood 60 degrees, hammer, etc. I needed a helper for the passenger (right) side.

If you do it this way, changes are you will need few or no extra tools, and it guarantees the seal will go in the right way the first time.
 

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Thanks alot. I changed mines when I had my trans out and for some reason, driver side leaks.I actually own a slide hammer kit, just not experienced enough to use it apprently.

I drove my seals in with an actual seal driver, but that is a good trick for the right person/situation.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G920A using Tapatalk
 

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The problem is simply getting them started straight with no damage doing it and more on the pass side since it is kind of in a tunnel there.

Once it is started in there pretty straight then it goes in the rest of the way relatively easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's the beauty of this method. Because of the splines, the axle HAS to go in centered. The seal will go in straight, every time.
 

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The next problem being of course, you actually do NOT want to have the axle go into seal but once if possible as the splines can commonly scratch/microcut the new seal rubber inner edges to leak. Using the splines as part of a hammer WILL flaw some of them eventually. It's how so many mechs screw them up if they got the seal in correctly, then haplessly sliding the axle in without watching that. Seal gets sliced and they wonder how they did it.

True seal install tech if used has a rolled edge end thinwall plastic sleeve go over splines so that the spline edges cannot cut the seal. Or something very similar.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The next problem being of course, you actually do NOT want to have the axle go into seal but once if possible as the splines can commonly scratch/microcut the new seal rubber inner edges to leak. Using the splines as part of a hammer WILL flaw some of them eventually.
As I said in the original post:

Take the axle and put it in the transmission, sliding it in as far as possible.

Try not to let the axle slide in and out of the transmission. There's enough play in the CV joints to achieve something of a hammering effect.
 

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Interesting trick for trying to start the seals in straight.

As mentioned, only good with an old axle avail. that isn't being reused.
 

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If using the seal mounting/running shoulder on axle as a seal holder tool I could see it.....axle may bottom to strike inner differential center pin before the axle seal shoulder bottoms seal out all the way in though. Meaning unless you look close seal may be in but not all the way bottomed. Why OP had to finish the job another way. Normal distancing there has the seal in place all the way and axle rubbing center pin with some clearance but outer face outboard of the seal shoulder cannot touch the seal itself in running. So, using that flat as the impact tool will have axle going in to strike pin pretty much. Unless old axle stub ground off maybe 1/4" off the spline end. That could make a good install tool methinks...........................you'd have to look close at the inner radius to see if big enough it damages outer lip of new seal...........food for thought. Made right the axle end may be the only tool needed there. A big enough fender washer with correct ID would push seal in even more if stuck on the axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
If using the seal mounting/running shoulder on axle as a seal holder tool I could see it
Not quite. As I already explained, I put the old seal on backward. The axle was striking the old seal, which in turn struck the new seal.

Meaning unless you look close seal may be in but not all the way bottomed. Why OP had to finish the job another way.
No, that's not it. You can only hammer so much with the CV joint; there's only so much play. The old axle got the seal started, but once it's so far on there, straight, it started resisting a lot more. That's when I got out the stick and hammer.

Normal distancing there has the seal in place all the way
Well... it's hard for me to think of somebody just whacking the seal in and saying that's good, with no inspection. I suppose an idiot might... but then, there are lots of idiots in this world.

So to be perfectly clear: run your fingernail around the outside of the seal, all 360 degrees. It should be perfectly flush with the transmission. If you can get your fingernail between the transmission and the seal, either you need to hammer some more, or clean the outside of the transmission.

A big enough fender washer with correct ID would push seal in even more if stuck on the axle.
Or the old seal... which again, is what I used.
 

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Oh, I already got plans of making a tool out of the axle stub I have lying around. It'll work perfectly once I get through with it. Thanks for pushing me to go there...............
 
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