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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm fussy about adjusting our tire pressure for changes in temperature, and for better mileage/handling. How to measure it is an ongoing problem.
I had a couple dial gauges that were consistent but not accurate, and have got a Sears electronic that works fairly well, but I don't trust electronic measures.
Here's what I'm looking for:
-Great accuracy
-Dial readout
-Bleed valve to ease setting pressures
-Durable, so I don't have to do this again

I don't mind spending some money for this; totaling up what I've wasted on cheap ones wouldn't be insignificant.

Anybody use a gauge that meets my criteria? Help me out here.
Thnx,
Moon
 

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You've got the right idea, though it really doesn't matter except for major temp changes like change of seasons - when summer inflation looses 5 pounds going to fall/winter temperatures....

The best/easiest is the dial type on a hose with the bleed button as you mentioned, it's std. "race" equipment - but like most things there are cheapo's that LOOK the same but aren't as consistent or accurate...

If you already have one that's "consistent", I'd use that because setting them evenly is more important than the exact actual value. if you know your gauge reads low by 2 pounds for example, just raise your std. pressure that much when setting them.

Luck!
 

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Go to Ebay type in tire gauge
now add the name of any German car maker
such as Porsche, Mercedes, BMW

My motormeter gauge that I bought ~40 years is still going strong

Ebay has it for ~$100 !!!

Do you think a German car company will sell an OEM product Chinese junk?
The vintage is made in Germany
 

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I watch my tire pressures carefully and found that the gauge I was using was reading 6 lbs UNDER.

So I ended up buying 3 different cheapo gauges that I can use to compare against one another in order to know if and when this happens again....they read within 1 lb of one another. (have two vehicles)

Don't count on the gauges at a tire place being accurate...as I found out.

Don't count on one very good gauge either...how will you know???

Easiest way is to buy them at various car parts stores.
 

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Honestly, though I have a BUNCH of gauges, the set of three stick type gauges in my main toolbox (low pressure, "normal" range and high pressure) are what gets used regularly.

Consistent, easy and quite accurate - haven't yet seen one that started giving wrong results without being obviously broken.

There IS a small amount of skill involved in using them properly, but the Scarecrow could probably do it right B4 he "got a brain".... (grin)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If you already have one that's "consistent", I'd use that because setting them evenly is more important than the exact actual value. if you know your gauge reads low by 2 pounds for example, just raise your std. pressure that much when setting them.

Luck!
I did just that for awhile, but it was making me crazy...delete two pounds for gauge error, add three pounds for difference in outside temperature, and then the Audi requires different pressure front and rear, and I run a little extra air in the Ford...waaaaaaaay too much head math. I was hoping to make things simpler!
Keep those ideas coming, folks.
Thnx,
Moon
 

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Daily ambient temperature variations can make as much difference as you are worrying about.

Set 'em "cold" (when the car hasn't been driven) at a time of day that's not excessively cold or warm for the season, and just recheck monthly in case there is an issue.

HATE to discourage someone from checking tires, as most NEVER bother...

But driving yourself nuts over precision that's not needed except at a race track when you are changing them constantly to adapt to conditions is NOT going to do you any good...

Even pressures in the right "ballpark" is all the tires really want to work well for you, variations less than 5 pounds are within an acceptable range of daily fluctuation...

I "nit-pick" getting them even side to side, and with the right difference front to rear, and then don't worry 'till the next regular check unless there is an obvious issue...

Auto maker's specs. are generally for comfort first, handling second and tire wear third.

Pick which you are most interested in and the recommendations will change - LONG discussion on this issue is possible, tire manufacturer's reps will give you a different set of suggestions for example since their major concern is long wear & safety over comfort or handling....

Take care!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sailor, I have the benefit of a garage to check pressures; have to check my daughter's tires out in the driveway when the sun isn't beating on one side of the car.
Yeah, always check cold, and do my best to fudge for the 1 lb for 10* thing; the garage will be of a different temperature than the ambient, tho' the detached garage where the Jeep lives can be about right for outdoor temps if there isn't too much sun load on it.
The Sears gauge I have usually works well enough; I'm just enough of a Luddite not to have full faith in electronic measures.
I usually check tires twice a month, but spring and fall, with their temp swings, require a little more attention.
I can tell a difference when my pressures are off my much.
Moon
 

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Halfmoonclip, I am also careful with tire pressures because I use my Focus to make a living-sales route. Check circle track and road racing parts and tool suppliers. Very good quality at reasonable prices due to a competitive business environment is available. Double check your dial gauge with a stick type gauge occasionally. The stick type are surprisingly accurate. I use 33lb. front and 28lb. rear with 100-150lb. load in the trunk.
You can check needed pressure by chalking across the tire tread and then rolling a short distance. Check the worn off chalk and adjust to even the chalk wear pattern. It's not fool proof or probably approved by tire mfg's., but it helps to see what's going on.
 

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The Chalk trick is REALLY good when tire mileage is the main concern, spreading the load evenly across the tread...

"race" equivalent is white liquid shoe polish up the sides to see what gets worn off when they "roll" in the corners...

Tires are actually molded at the "max load rating pressure" noted on the sidewall, and in "normal" conditions that is where they take the proper shape (tread flat on the ground) so it gives you a decent starting point. (learned from a Dunlop tire Rep. when we were discussing the cycle tires he was "repping" at the time). We have a factory here in town (Buffalo area) and the tour was QUITE interesting...

Hey, I can be "Anal" about T.P.'s myself - didn't know how much experience/knowledge you had so I wanted to throw out some hints to keep you from worrying TOO much...
(grin)

Cheers!
 
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