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First this is my first post here and this site is great. I have a 2010 focus ses with 52,000 miles on it. Ford say the transmission fluid doesn't need changed until 120k. I have a hard time believing that. The dealership that I bought it from said that they recommend changing at 65k. They were great to buy from but they are very slow when it comes to maintenance. Like 3 hours for an oil change. But they said that they don't flush the trans with detergents with is what I want I think. They are about 45 minutes from where I live and if an oil change takes 3 hours id hate to see how long this is gonna take. The ford dealer in town said they can do it but its useless if I don't have them run detergents through it. I know everyone has heard of the horror stories when it comes to transmission flushes and how it can cause more problems. Knock on wood there are no problems with this car and I don't want any to start. So what do you guys think or what have you done. Is it ok to run detergents through or should I go with just fluid.
 

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The oil itself has detergents, you are way overthinking this. There is no way a 5 minute flush is going to be enough time for 'detergents' to work. The 65K number to change could be about right as modified by actually looking at the color of the fluid, it will tell you and varies based on your driving habits. The fluid is red to begin with and turns orange and then brown as it begins to burn. I personally do not let mine get to brown, or around 50-60K
 

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If it's already past brown, then don't change it. Otherwise, I don't think it's too late.

You gotta remember that transmission fluid is corrosive, so putting fresh fluid sometimes can eat through old gaskets, and worn bands, worm gears, e.c.t.

Just keep up with the recommended mileage intervals by Ford, and change your filter while your in there. Should be fine!
 

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'You gotta remember that transmission fluid is corrosive, so putting fresh fluid sometimes can eat through old gaskets, and worn bands, worm gears, e.c.t.'

They must have some schools there in Michigan, trans fluid in no way is corrosive. The opposite, they protect from corrosion.
 

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'You gotta remember that transmission fluid is corrosive, so putting fresh fluid sometimes can eat through old gaskets, and worn bands, worm gears, e.c.t.'

They must have some schools there in Michigan, trans fluid in no way is corrosive. The opposite, they protect from corrosion.
Sorry, I must of been tired when I typed this, lol. [nono]

Either way though, the OP does need to be careful, because I've changed fluid after too many miles before, and the transmission began shifting harder immediately after the change. Some mechanics believe that the new fluid pushes old crap through and can damage internal parts.

Truth or myth, you think? Wasn't trying to start any arguments guy, sorry. [B)]

So, not to thread jack from here on out. Just another quick question. Is it safe to do a fluid and filter change at 113,000 on the clock now? Not sure if it's ever been changed or not...
 

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I've flushed a ton of high mileage trans and never had a problem. Maybe I got lucky. Just a filter change is not going to get most of the fluid out best to flush it get clean fluid in the whole thing then change the filter.
 

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It's a myth.
People who neglect the trans for 100K+ miles, then when it starts to act up, they flush the trans fluid and blame that last action on the failure.
 

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It's a myth.
People who neglect the trans for 100K+ miles, then when it starts to act up, they flush the trans fluid and blame that last action on the failure.

...but if it is a myth, then why does the transmission generally begin to act up, right after the fluid and filter change? In most cases, of course.
 

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...but if it is a myth, then why does the transmission generally begin to act up, right after the fluid and filter change? In most cases, of course.
It acts up before the change, which prompts the owner to finally change the fluid for the first time, then when it dies they blame the fluid change rather than their own neglect.
 

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Haven't seen this discussion for a while.

When I joined the Forum you'd hear more often of folks being sold a "back flush" of the system, and there was speculation that process would get crud into places where it didn't belong when done on a trans. that hadn't been serviced for a LONG time.

Normal drain & fill causes no problems, and a "flush" type change that uses the engine/trans normal flow to change fluid using the cooler hoses won't either if done correctly (pumping all the fluid out ISN'T correct!).
 

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Haven't seen this discussion for a while.

When I joined the Forum you'd hear more often of folks being sold a "back flush" of the system, and there was speculation that process would get crud into places where it didn't belong when done on a trans. that hadn't been serviced for a LONG time.
This is what I was talking about. I guess a complete "flush" is much different when compared to just a fluid and filter change.
 

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Quote the whole post now...

The "Back Flush" by a powered machine was the one folks were commenting on possible problems from, different from both a complete flush & a fluid/filter change.

Haven't heard of this for a while, wonder how many places might still do it.
 

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...but if it is a myth, then why does the transmission generally begin to act up, right after the fluid and filter change? In most cases, of course.

All the reasons as previously stated - and one extra little tidbit.

The PCM controlling your ATX is a smart black box. In addition to monitoring the 'wear' within your transmission and then 'compensating' for this, it also learns how 'you' drive and compensates for that too - to a very limited degree. If my wife has been driving the car for awhile and I then drive it, I notice a difference too. New fluid might be enough of a change for the PCM to recognize something has changed - the clutches are 'wet' clutches iirc.
 

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Quote the whole post now...

The "Back Flush" by a powered machine was the one folks were commenting on possible problems from, different from both a complete flush & a fluid/filter change.

Haven't heard of this for a while, wonder how many places might still do it.
I used to work at Fast Eddie's car wash back a few years ago. They still did it when I worked there. Just a fluid and filter service was nearly $150 dollars! [xx(]
 

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And the REAL reason why they do it, more marketing upon the common man who literally knows nothing and how these rumors get started. The much bigger profits.

You do NOT want to disturb wear particles that have gotten stuck in running sediments, that is what stirred up then fails parts later. What on earth does the magnet do there??? It doesn't take enough thinking to heat your hair oil to be able to translate that idea to engine instead of trans and insert 'seafoam in oil' in place of the word flush. Or the question I continually ask, just WHAT IS IT you are trying to clean out of the engine?????? I say leave the trash stuck where it doesn't hurt parts. Flushing is a response to not doing work that should have been done long ago.

The PCM really cannot compensate for anything inside trans wearing except line pressure possibly, it cannot make up for any true wear on parts, the initial build clearances are set to allow for the most wear possible unless you have a rebuilt trans, the trans shops generally slap all that back together without really resetting clearances for max life there. It costs them way too much money spending that kind of time on them. Why I do all my own ATX and haven't had one last less than 10 years after rebuilding it. For instance the 2-4 band on these uses a special length band set screw that comes in different lengths, you measure using special tools and change the screw based on the clearance of band. You can buy like a $4 dollar bolt and nut and then make your own adjustable band like in the old days like I did, these are not adjustable except for changing the screw, somewhat more difficult. The clutch packs get set to a nominal clearance and the servo piston the same. Nothing the PCM can do to make up for any of that being off.

If one thinks the wife driving the car has changed the trans I suggest examining the thinking process there. I switch with others on three different PCM trans cars a month or more at a time and no difference there at all.

Trans fails right after the new fluid change because it was minutes away from failing anyway. Why it began to act up. Human nature being what it is, the owner then blames the fluid change being reluctant of course to think that his forestalling of changing the fluid to begin with is what caused the problem. It cannot be my fault, therefor it must be the fluid, or the big fakeout to self that causes so many other problems. Fix the driver first.................and 2/3 of the car problems disappear.
 

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Either I completely missed this bit of information in this thread or we haven't determined whether this is an automatic or manual transmission that's being asked about. The fluid change intervals are vastly different between the two. Can you confirm whether this is auto or manual?
 

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They mention flushing in OP and I personally have never heard of flushing a MTX. I too may have tilted the thread with my first response toward earlier models and my bad.
 

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I see a marketing opportunity to see manual gearbox flush services. ;)
 
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