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Discussion Starter #3
I had one on my 13 Mustang GT. Between oil changes it was about 1/2 full. Is it necessary....probably not. Doesn't hurt to have it though.
I think the Coyote ( your GT motor) still sprayed into the runners on 13's. I just ordered one cause of your 1/2 full comment. And I run amsoil and change at 10k, so thats alot of oil a dry intake system has to handle.

Thank you so much for your fast reply, really appreciate it.
 

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anyone running a oil seperator at the PCV valve? ]
You do realize that the Focus ST has an oil separator already installed at the factory? It has the advantage of being self draining as it returns oil to the crankcase. If your intent is to limit carbon fouling of your intake valves, most aftermarket catch cans are worthless. They won't do anything that the factory separator isn't already doing and you will have to empty them periodically. Neither the factory separator nor the aftermarket catch cans do anything for oil vapor, the enemy of intake valves in a direct injected engine.

If you really want to limit carbon fouling, run the lowest NOACK synthetic oil you can find.

If you are determined to run a catch can, the only one that might work against oil vapor is the Mann-Hummel Provent. Bring your checkbook, they aren't cheap.

https://www.mann-hummel.com/en/corp/products/crankcase-ventilation/

Pictured below is the Focus ST factory oil separator:

Ford Focus ST Part # AG9Z6A785A - Factory Oil Separator 2.0 LITER TURBO
 

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Just to add, the car has two places a separator might be used.
The PCV valve in the upper back of the engine. Which the op (IMO) is mentioning. Two devices available are the Steeda (which is about $70), and JLT (which is about $120)

The back one is from the crankcase to the intake prior to turbo.
Folks mention getting the oil out of that area is a good idea.
The Steeda is installed in a bad IMO location. Behind the intake pipe, so to empty it you have to take a lot of stuff apart.
The JLT installs over to the passenger side and is easy to empty.
Though it does cost twice as much.
I opted for the JLT, as the extra cost is worth never having to dismantle stuff every time. (plus I used $35 in CJ Pony free money I had available)

Actually the Steeda could easily be relocated with a few common parts. (longer tubing, and a T connector instead of a straight one)
Anyway, the upper rear one is the one I thnk the op is referring to. The lower front one is the one Wavsine is referringto.
 

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If you are going to spend the money on a catch can I would look int othe RX catch can. I have done a lot of research on this topic more so for my truck than my cars, and I have been running the RX can for almost a year. ITs a dual check valve setup and puts air thru the can under boost and vacuum. Most cans out there dont pull air when engine is under boost, you would be surprise how much the ecoboost border that line between vacuum and boost even cruising down the highway.
http://www.rxperformanceproducts.com/
This is what I collect about every other tank of fuel.

 

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I have both the JLT catch can between the valve cover and intake along with a Moroso catch can between the pcv valve and intake manifold. The JLT doesn't catch much but is worth it to help keep the turbo clean. The Moroso is alot more effect. This is after a 275 mile trip.

 
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