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My first OBDII car. Dad gave it to me when he bought a wagon. The engine light is on and the error was a O2 heater error (p0036?) when he gave it to me since he just kept reseting it. Anyways found a blown fuse (front of fuse looked fine so a pull revealed the issue) and my dad already changed the o2. Will it clear after xxx miles or do I need a obd-ii reader to reset it? If so will a cheapy work? Thanks! [wiggle]
 

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Well now you know something you dad didn't- O2 sensor codes aren't always repaired by replacing the sensor. Especially in the case of a blown fuse on the heater circuit.

Disconnect the neg battery terminal for 10 mins. Reconnect the negative terminal securely, and start the engine. Allow the engine to idle for 6-7 minutes, or until the idle drops to normal idle speed around 700. The PCM does a A/F test for 5 minutes after the engine falls out of high start-up idle. It does time it for 5 minutes, which is why I recommend waiting for exactly 7 minutes. Make sure that the idle has dropped to it's normal level before you touch the accelerator or turn off the vehicle.
 

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In his defense the fuse wasn't blow if you just looked at it. Like I said once you pull it you would see a burned out black spot on the leg of the fuse on the other side of what is visible, etc! :)
 

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check the o2 connectors, clean them if you have to
 

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In his defense the fuse wasn't blow if you just looked at it. Like I said once you pull it you would see a burned out black spot on the leg of the fuse on the other side of what is visible, etc! :)
That's nice, I wasn't ragging your dad or anything. I'm an industrial electrician- no fuse is checked until it's removed and tested for continuity. What happened to your dad is not uncommon- these fuses only give visible clues while in place about half the time. We have seen fuses look good, that are not good, but you can't easily see any damage to the inside of the fuse- it's really rare though.
 
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