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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys,

Just wanted to give a quick review of my new tires, I have a 2012 Titanium with the handling package and 18" wheels and the factory Michelins were pretty much bald at 21k.

I wanted to get something with a little softer ride and all-season so I'm not spinning out everywhere I go in the winter so I settled on Uniroyal TigerPaw 235/40/18's. So far the difference in how the car feels, sounds and drives is like night and day, it feels more responsive, is much quieter and rides much smoother. The other benefit is that the tires seem to have less rolling resistance so it can coast quite a ways, which helps with fuel economy if you feather it.

All in all so far this is the best "mod" I've done to my car. This combined with the fact that my transmission is working pretty much flawless since they replaced the clutch and seal last summer really makes me love driving this thing that much more!
 

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I was most interested in your review. I also have the handling package and the 18 inch Michelin pilot sport 3's. With the weather ias unusually cold as it has been here in north Georgia over the past week, I've suddenly discovered why you don't run summer performance tires in cold weather.

The first thing I noticed was how much harder they are riding. And most recently with the coldest temperatures, even on dry pavement, the grip just goes to hell fast.

Definitely going to keep this in mind when it comes time to replace the Michelin's. Thank you for the review.
 

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I was most interested in your review. I also have the handling package and the 18 inch Michelin pilot sport 3's. With the weather ias unusually cold as it has been here in north Georgia over the past week, I've suddenly discovered why you don't run summer performance tires in cold weather.

The first thing I noticed was how much harder they are riding. And most recently with the coldest temperatures, even on dry pavement, the grip just goes to hell fast.

Definitely going to keep this in mind when it comes time to replace the Michelin's. Thank you for the review.
The Goodyears that come on the ST are even worse. It was 17 out when i left for work a couple days ago, ran it through the gears on Sport mode and had nothing but wheel spin in first, second, and part of third. granted my ST has more power than your titanium, but the tires are just terrible!
 

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The Goodyears that come on the ST are even worse. It was 17 out when i left for work a couple days ago, ran it through the gears on Sport mode and had nothing but wheel spin in first, second, and part of third. granted my ST has more power than your titanium, but the tires are just terrible!
The tires are not the problem here.

You're not supposed to drive on summer only rubber below 40 degrees F.

If you expected them not to spin easier when they become hard and less than useful than that's driver error.

It's stated on the door placard as well as in the owners guide supplement that you're not meant to be driving on those tires under these conditions. In the dead of summer they are nice and sticky, but in the dead of winter they turn into hockey pucks.
 

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The tires are not the problem here.

You're not supposed to drive on summer only rubber below 40 degrees F.

If you expected them not to spin easier when they become hard and less than useful than that's driver error.

It's stated on the door placard as well as in the owners guide supplement that you're not meant to be driving on those tires under these conditions. In the dead of summer they are nice and sticky, but in the dead of winter they turn into hockey pucks.
I had no expectations for them to hook at all, but wasn't expecting them to spin as bad as they did. I've had summer only tires on many RWD cars in the past with a lot more power and torque that didn't spin as bad as these things do. 270lb ft going through these Goodyears resulted in more wheelspin than 430 ft lb through some Michelin PS2's.

To call it driver error is an exaggeration, when you have no expectations. My ST is my daily driver and I live in an area that doesn't usually get much below 30 at the coldest point of the year and on average stays at or slightly over 40.
 

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The tires are not the problem here.

You're not supposed to drive on summer only rubber below 40 degrees F.

If you expected them not to spin easier when they become hard and less than useful than that's driver error.

It's stated on the door placard as well as in the owners guide supplement that you're not meant to be driving on those tires under these conditions. In the dead of summer they are nice and sticky, but in the dead of winter they turn into hockey pucks.
I had no expectations for them to hook at all, but wasn't expecting them to spin as bad as they did. I've had summer only tires on many RWD cars in the past with a lot more power and torque that didn't spin as bad as these things do. 270lb ft going through these Goodyears resulted in more wheelspin than 430 ft lb through some Michelin PS2's.

To call it driver error is an exaggeration, when you have no expectations. My ST is my daily driver and I live in an area that doesn't usually get much below 30 at the coldest point of the year and on average stays at or slightly over 40.
Take it from a couple people who live 9 months out of the year in temperatures below 30 degrees. If you have summer tires on your car and its below 40 degrees, you're going to spin the hell out your tires. It doesn't matter if its goodyear, michelin, or walmart brand. It's because of the type of rubber compound, it's the same reason there is such an ENORMOUS difference between All-Season and Winter tires.

When I was in HS I had a Chevy Cavalier. I (thought) I bought winter tires, and it turned out some noob employee put on Michelin summer tires. Within a week my car was barely even driveable.
 

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I only buy Michelins for my cars, the best bang for the buck. Your problem was you had summer tires, not all season tires.
 

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Strichmädchen & Koks
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I had no expectations for them to hook at all, but wasn't expecting them to spin as bad as they did. I've had summer only tires on many RWD cars in the past with a lot more power and torque that didn't spin as bad as these things do. 270lb ft going through these Goodyears resulted in more wheelspin than 430 ft lb through some Michelin PS2's.

To call it driver error is an exaggeration, when you have no expectations. My ST is my daily driver and I live in an area that doesn't usually get much below 30 at the coldest point of the year and on average stays at or slightly over 40.
Some summer tires perform better at colder temps then others. Regardless, NO summer tire should be run below 40*F. Expecting any of them to do so with any regularity is asking for trouble.

Don't blame the tire for something it's not designed to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was aware of how summer tires perform in the winter already, my original comment about smoothness still applies to these new tires in summer or winter though. I think this is probably due to a softer side wall (which I know compromises handling, but yeah I definitely agree that the majority of spinning out was due to cold weather.
 

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Curious how much the tigerpaws cost you? I just ordered a set of all-season General G-Max tires to wrap around my ST wheels yesterday.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I paid $131 a piece for mine, I'm going to get a cheaper estimate from Kaufman tire and take it back because Ford will price match.
 

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ELVIS LIVES !
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I run Goodyear Eagle RSA all season tires and they do pretty good for an all season tire. They do not hook up as good as a summer tire in warm weather, but they ride real nice and do good in the rain and snow. All depends on what kind of tire you are looking for. But if you drive your car year round stay with a good all season.
 

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It's definitely driver error if you keep spinning through the gears and don't clue in to what's happening.
I'm very much aware of what to expect out of summer tires in winter time. I've been driving performance cars since I started driving and have always had summer tires on them.

My point being that some summer tires are worse than others in cold temps. When the temps are below 45ish I don't play around much. But when you can take a car with 430 lb ft of torque with Michelin PS2's and hammer down in 30* temps and not spin nearly as much as a 270 lb ft car with these Goodyears then something isn't right, as in Michelin makes better tires than Goodyear period. When these Goodyears wear out some Michelin PS3's will be going on the car.

Like I said earlier, around where I live the coldest temps average around 40. there are a few days below, sure, but I still drive my ST to work on the terrible summer tires and have no issues because I drive like a sane person I would rather have summer tires than no seasons because on most days my daily commute is just that, a daily commute. To say that summer tires cannot be driven below 40 isn't exactly right. You won't get the most performance out of them below 40, but if you drive like a normal person, and not speed racer, they will be fine on a daily commute, even in 17* temps like we had the other morning.

You can hate all you want, but in the end it's my car and I will use whatever tires i want to.
 

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I think it pretty much depends on the weather. I run summer tires all the time since I have been in Florida. It can reach high 40's here not all the time but it is a steady 55-60 during the winter months. Except today when it will reach 80.

I personally would never take a chance with summer tires in the snow or below 40 degrees. It also depends on your driving habits. For me, I just care about how freaking quiet the ride it. Im 52 and rarely hit 10 miles over the speed limit. I prefer not to be ranked in the DMV database as a persistent violator. Yep, that how I was classified in New York DMV as a young man. I paid more money for violations and insurance rates I care to remember way back then...

It was never fun see the traffic court judge. Especially one time the judge says he was in a favorable mood that morning and offered me two choices and I can choose which one. Turn in my license for six months or have the court suspend my license for six months lol :)

Listen, the bottom line is its your car and you can do with it as you please. I do not think anyone here was telling you what to do. They were just voicing their experience.
 

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My daily commute is at a speed of 55-60. My 7 month old son is in the car at all times just about. I don't play with him in the car period. 5 over is generally where I ride at, and if in the off chance there is snow my car doesn't leave the garage, I'll use my old Silverado that day just because I would prefer someone run into it than my ST, the extra ground clearance is nice too. It's raining and 39 degrees coming in this morning and no mishaps, tires were fine as they were when it was 17 the one day.

Just because the temp is under 40 doesn't make them dangerous. Probably offer more traction than the bald tires on the cars around you.
 

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I'm very much aware of what to expect out of summer tires in winter time. I've been driving performance cars since I started driving and have always had summer tires on them.

My point being that some summer tires are worse than others in cold temps. When the temps are below 45ish I don't play around much. But when you can take a car with 430 lb ft of torque with Michelin PS2's and hammer down in 30* temps and not spin nearly as much as a 270 lb ft car with these Goodyears then something isn't right, as in Michelin makes better tires than Goodyear period. When these Goodyears wear out some Michelin PS3's will be going on the car.

Like I said earlier, around where I live the coldest temps average around 40. there are a few days below, sure, but I still drive my ST to work on the terrible summer tires and have no issues because I drive like a sane person I would rather have summer tires than no seasons because on most days my daily commute is just that, a daily commute. To say that summer tires cannot be driven below 40 isn't exactly right. You won't get the most performance out of them below 40, but if you drive like a normal person, and not speed racer, they will be fine on a daily commute, even in 17* temps like we had the other morning.

You can hate all you want, but in the end it's my car and I will use whatever tires i want to.
There's so much wrong with this statement. Summer tires are NOT made to driven in temps below 45 deg, period. End of story. That's what makes it a SUMMER tire. The compound is such that driving it in temps below 45 degrees, is to use it against what it was made for. It would be like drinking a Pepsi at halftime of a sporting event youre competing in, and then complaining of cramps.

So essentially, when you drive a summer in 30 degrees, it should be a HORRIBLE ride. Just as a winter tire should be HORRIBLE in the summer.

The summer tires are made with a compound of rubber that essentially turns into hard plastic when it gets below 45 degrees, the tires basically freeze up. They get hard as a rock and should have barely any traction. All-Season tires are similar, but what makes the "all-season" is essentially a tread design that doesn't clog up as easily as a summer tires does.

Winter tires are MUCH softer and remain soft when it gets below freezing. Which is why above 45 degrees, winter tires get chewed up and spit out.

I'm not saying your driving ability is bad or anything. But don't use tires in a manner they were in no way designed for, and then complain or say one is better than the other because it works better in the way it's not supposed to work. The Goodyear summer tire should be slipping and sliding all over when it get cold out, that's the mark of a good SUMMER tire.

But if you want to say Michelin summer tires are better for you and work better as an all season tire, go ahead. But just because they have better grip in the cold doesn't make it a better summer tire. In fact, it's the opposite, the fact that it gets such good grip in below 45 degrees, might make it a worse summer tire.
 

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you are entitled to your opinion. My experience has been with only summer tires on various different cars over the years. perhaps you should look into the PS2/PS3's. They are the go to tire for a lot of street cars that do track days fairly often. My experience with Goodyears is exactly like the name, good for a year and performance falls off quickly after that, they don't age well. In the Corvettes that I have had, I've run everything from cheap Sumitomo (never use these if you will track a car) to Toyo T1R's. Michelin is what I normally put on my cars and will continue to be what I put on, summer only at that. For a daily driver that is driven in rain only the summer tires work well enough. You have to keep in mind I'm not talking about racing on them in low temps, just normal driving.
 
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