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Discussion Starter #1
I just got a paint job about a week and a half ago and there's some drips that need wetsanded and buffed. There's also alot of orange peel and I wanted to buff or buff and wet sand out. I want to do it over the whole car but am not sure how sensitive the paint will be to this, or if it will just become a pain as it cures more trying to get it perfect. It's a single stage paint job.

Should I spend time doing the whole car or wait till after winter and do the whole car that way I can wax it afterwards?
 

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why didn't the shop that painted it take care of these issues for you? or was it a DIY?
either way, you can do the work yourself.
waiting three months for the paint to cure isn't a bad idea so you can wax it, but wet sanding, buffing and polishing now will help protect the paint a little bit.
 

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if they shop used a hardener, which i hope they did, you should be able to wetsand after a few days, without any adverse problems.

One tip, if you have large runs, or thick drips, use a razor blade to actually level them off. You want to remove about 75% of the build-up and then block the rest off. This will help to keep you from burning up the paint when you go to cut and polish the paint after wetsanding.

As for any other imperfections, as long as they are minor (not deep fish eye) they should be able to be wetsanded out. . . especially any orange peel.

I see you're in PA. I'd be willing to do it for you at no charge, but perhaps a donation (lol) if you could make the drive up here.

BTW - i wouldn't recommend waxing the paint for at least 30 days to allow the paint to properly off-gas. You also want to use "body-shop safe" polishes if you decide to cut and polish the paint. Those polishes that aren't body-shop safe contain silicone and/or waxes.

Good luck, and PM me if you have questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It was a freebie diy job and we did it outside. My dad told me from the start it wouldnt be perfect and couldnt understand why I was putting so much effort into prepping the car.

As far as I can tell there is just orange peel and a couple drips from the guns cap cracking. On the mirrors there is fish eye, but we forgot to spray the back so I was thinking of wetsanding them down and buying a color matched spray bomb and doing them myself, or waiting till I decide to do that to the side skirts or whatever.

cbren were in ohio are you, I'm asking because I'll be living in blairsville pretty soon. I'd love to have some help and tips but do want to do it myself. I kinda want to be apart of this whole thing, everything on the car as been done by me so far except for tire mounting and air conditioning recharge [:)]

If I wait to do this after winter, since the paint has cured will it be tougher to work on? I cant imagine trying to get orange peel out of paint would be any harder then now but I could be wrong. It's going to be under cover for the winter so protection is only on my mind during rain and for bugs, sun and other random stuff. Is it still a good idea to get on it now if I have time?
 

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a week and a half the paint is cured out by now, i would use rubbing compound to buff out the orange peel and wet sand the runs out. i have rubed out orange peel before with the rubbing compound and had great results and only waited a week after drying. also you can have the paint left over put into a spray can to give the best match.

the mirrors probaly fished eyed because you didnt use adhesion promoter or painted to soon after putting the promoter on. if you didnt use promoter than sand all the paint off and start over.

ive got pretty good with painting so if you have any ? shoot me a pm
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think I have a boatload of 1600 grit wet/dry sanding paper. Is this going to be good enough to be on the safe side and not take too long?
 

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you'll want to sand VERY lightly. When you wet sand the gloss coat, you simply want to smooth it out, not take any of the coat away. And keep that mutha wet as hell. Keep a spray bottle in one hand and sand with the other. But let just the grit of the sand paper catch, don't actually apply pressure because you'll be ever so screwed if you go too deep. But as you wet sand, look real close and you can see all the pits and orange peel. It would be ideal if you had enough clear that you can get rid of every single pit and peel because once you polish/wax, it'll be like glass. But it takes A LOT of time and patients and probably some advil.

Follow it by a lot of polish compound. That stuff also isn't afraid of water, so don't be afraid to mist it every once and awhile. When you polish, make sure you have a nice high powered drill to polish. I use a Mothers polish ball. While you're polishing, don't get scared if you see polish build up and have white stuff around. You can take a damp cloth and wipe it away.

Wax it, and you're done.

[edit] i just read you have a single stage paint job. I would be careful then about doing the wetsanding.
 

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yeah, the 1600 should be fine, but I'd recomend following up with 2000 or or higher. When wet sanding, I like to use a square sponge like for doing dishes and wrap the paper around it, if you are compressing the sponge at all your applying to much pressure, plus it aides in keeping the paper wet, I like to mix in just a bit a dish soap for my soaking bucket, and use the same solution in the spray bottle.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well wetsanding a single stage would be just like a bc/cc accept if you screw up your into primer or in my case your old paint.

Right?
 

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I don't think it is good idea to sand metallic paint, that is one of the reasons for a clearcoat. If you used non-metallic paint, then it should sand OK.
 

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its been a while since I did anything with single stage, but I'm pretty sure its the same, but if you cut into your primer or old paint, either you don't have enough on or your sanding to much!

In clear coat applications, you can wet sand away...until you hit the base coat.
 
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