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Discussion Starter #1
My first first dyno run in stock trim was 94hp at 5600rpm and 96.8 lb.ft of torque at 4500 rpm, my best pull today was 104hp at 5700rpm and 107.8 lb.ft of torque at 4700rpm, not too bad for a CAI, 2.5 inch flexpipe and 2.5 inch catback[:D] What do you guys think?
 

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104 hp on a Focus? what kind of focus do you have man?
 

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I'd say that's not a bad gain from just an intake and exhaust.
 

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I dont get dynos...I have an automatic too, and like the ford focus should be 130hp shouldn't it? and with those mods, his should be like 140hp...shouldn't it? I feel stupid...
 

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130 H.P. Is at the fly wheel, real horsepower is measured at the wheels, you lose power throught the drive shaft and so on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Red Baron: its a ZX3
 

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OOOOOH, so if like...flywheel when the car's wheels aren't even on the ground...?

God, i feel real stupid.
haha
 

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so what would be the dyno on like a stick shift one
 

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Red Baron said:
I dont get dynos...I have an automatic too, and like the ford focus should be 130hp shouldn't it? and with those mods, his should be like 140hp...shouldn't it? I feel stupid...
And with an ATX you lose a little more because the torque converter is inefficient, you can get a better one from Lentech which would help or just a completely new performance automatic.
 

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lol no a flywheel has nothing to do with the wheels... its the hp the engine puts out before the driveline... theres an energy loss when it goes thru the driveline to get to ur wheels. its about 15% generally. a 5 spd focus should make abuot 105-110 at the wheels... and an auto around 98.
 

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OMGVTAK!
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That doesn't sound too bad, sasquatch. Makes you wanna do more modding, huh?
[:D]
 

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Alright, now that i've embarassed myself enough, thanks for the help. I can't wait to go out and get some mods.
 

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fOCUS Zetec 2.0
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that's what we're all here for - learning. Good to see you've begun the modding trail. Can be very rewarding and lots of fun. Best of luck!!

Cheers,
Matt
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Euro ZX3: I think the ATX in our cars takes more than 15%, more like a 20 to 25% power loss, plus the temperature was a lot less than the first time I had her dynoed, it was 66 degrees when I had it done.
 

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sasquatch said:
Euro ZX3: I think the ATX in our cars takes more than 15%, more like a 20 to 25% power loss, plus the temperature was a lot less than the first time I had her dynoed, it was 66 degrees when I had it done.
Temperature - WHAT? This raises a significant question: were the numbers you posted "corrected"? Basically, what that means is, a mathematical formula should have been applied to the raw dyno numbers to adjust them to so-called "standard" atmospheric conditions.

You see, air that is colder and drier is more dense. More dense air means more oxygen in the cylinders for each combustion cycle, which means more power. A dyno run on a 90F day is going to produce lower numbers than a dyno run (identical car) on a 60F day. The mathematical formula is used so the numbers will come out the same.

If no correction was used, part of your reported gains are simply due to the cooler air.

I should probably mention that altitude plays a major role in air density too. Assuming you used the same dyno both times, altitude didn't change, which is why I neglected to mention it earlier.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Is that mathmatical equation built into the dyno software?
 

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You would hope so...
 

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sasquatch said:
Is that mathmatical equation built into the dyno software?
GREAT question, wish I had a definitive answer for you. It certainly can be built-in. It would still require the dyno operator to enter local barometer, temperature, and RH at some point while he is setting up for the run (or, I suppose, a REAL fancy dyno could potentially have a little weather-station built in, or, or, maybe have it look up local weather conditions automatically on the Web, or...)

Ask the dyno operator if it is corrected. You are likely to get either "Of course!" at which point you can ask exactly how it's done; or, you get that blank stare that tells you he doesn't know what you're talking about which is a sure "nope".
 
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