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Discussion Starter #1
I have the Koni Sport kit ready to install but I am having problems with the bump stops. After I slide on the bumpstop and then the strut mount I do not have enough room, enough threads showing in other words, to get the nut started and tighten everything up. I have cut down the bumpstops (Prothane) and looked at new replacements from Moog but I really see no way of making this work. IIRC, this was not an issue when I did this last time and used KYBs. Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated very helpful and appreciated!
 

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slow
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I assume you are talking about the front struts? The shaft and hence the retaining nut are different size then stock and some aftermarkets (they are bigger).

Are you using the stock top mounts? Are you using stock springs?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, the front struts. I have new stock (Moog) top mounts with the matching Koni springs. Unfortunately the type of spring is irrelevant. The Konis come with a lock washer and nut to fit the top, threaded part of the piston of the strut. What I am saying is that by the time I slip the bumpstop with boot and then the mount over onto the strut, the threaded end of the strut does not stick through far enough to allow me to catch the nut. The springs have no say in this part because they are compressed.

I can eliminate the bumpstop from the top and make it work easily, but at that point I am bolting the strut/piston straight onto the mount. I am pretty sure that the bumbstop is supposed to go in between the top of the piston and the mount. That's how it works on the stock setup and worked the same way on the set of KYBs I used before.

If I DO eliminate the bump top, then how do I get the boot to work? The bumpstop actually holds the boot in place (or vice versa) up top and then you zip tie it off on the bottom.

Maybe I don't have the correct parts. but I don't think that's the case...
 

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The Koni is a shorter shock so a shorter bump stop makes sense. Using one designed for a full length shock will probably be a little too long. Bump stops come in different lengths just for this purpose.
 

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slow
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Seems odd that the bump stop is causing the issue... it shouldn't come into play until the shock is almost fully compressed, and this shouldn't be the case for install. I vaguely remember some issue in fitting the bumpstop on my setup, and getting it over a step in the piston shaft. Its been some time though, and I was using LCR camber plates, its all a bit foggy...
 

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wrc, you're right that getting a stock bump stop over the shaft can be a problem. The Koni has a bigger diameter shaft and stock bump stops (or stock replacement ones) won't readily fit over it. The OP said he used some prothane ones and I'm not sure if they're any longer than stock which may complicate issues or if he had any issues with the diameter as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Lol, yes, very foggy although I don't know why since this is my 5th time doing this on a Ford! I went ahead and got the bumpstop over the step in the piston rod and tightened it all together. That left that 'step' in the piston rod tight against the bottom of the strut mount. That makes for metal to metal contact and for some reason I was thinking that there was supposed to be something in between the two.

I took a look at the stock setup, it's still on the car, and was able to pull the bumpstop down with my hands. So, I'm going to assume my thinking was wrong and go ahead with what I'm doing now.

I just get all new parts and swap out the whole assembly. I don't mess with taking the old one apart, by this time the parts are pretty worn out anyway. Now, if I can just change the front sway bar bushings without dropping the subframe I will be in business, lol...

Thanks for your time!
 

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Glad you got it figured out! Dropping the subframe was not as bad as I thought ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
No, dropping the subframe was easy. BUT removing the swaybar brackets was just ignorant! I have been working on Fords for 25 years, from a 5.0 Mustang to a couple of SHOs and now onto my 2nd SVTF. I always said that if you could work on a SHO then you could work on anything, but those swaybar bushings have to be THE hardest thing I have ever done to a car!! Whoever came up with that design needs to have their ass beat by a tribe of midget clowns!

Did you experience any alignment difficulties after bolting the subframe back up? I know that on the SHOs you had to be careful with that. Just wondering if the same is needed for the Focus?
 
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