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So I had an idea the other day...If you don't want to dish out the money for a turbo kit atm and are looking for just a little more performance as well as better gas mileage why not just jimmy rig an intercooler to your intake? Now THAT is a cold air intake.

What do you guys think about the idea? [:)~]
 

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Sorry to be the first to nay you, but as nice and deceiveing as it may look, all the bends and distance the air travels would hurt you in the long run; you can get a good CAI n it'll so a better job....IMO

As far as the mileage I wouldnt be too sure , but good luck on ur decision.
Rich
 

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Yea I had the same idea a loooooooooooong time ago but it won't work, theres too many bends like he said and you won't be seeing any useful benefits
 

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That sucks. I thought it would be a nice addition to an all motor car. Oh well.
 

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an IC is needed because the exhaust gasses can signifigantly heat up the air going into the intake from heat soak at turbo. warm air is less dense and burns less fuel per volume of air.
An IC adds nothing to a car if the intake is allready at ambient temperature.
 

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an IC is needed because the exhaust gasses can signifigantly heat up the air going into the intake from heat soak at turbo. (and any time you compress something it makes it warmer... lbs PSI = lbs per square inch above ambient)warm air is less dense and burns less fuel per volume of air.
An IC adds nothing to a car if the intake is allready at ambient temperature.
^^^^ this

Intercoolers go inbetween a compressor and the throttle body... anything else is rice.
 

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an IC is needed because the exhaust gasses can signifigantly heat up the air going into the intake from heat soak at turbo. warm air is less dense and burns less fuel per volume of air.
An IC adds nothing to a car if the intake is allready at ambient temperature.
while heat soak adding heat is true characteristic of a turbo system, the thing that really adds the majority of the heat to the air is the pressure change, basically adding an intercooler to a NA car and getting a significant temperature drop will break the rules of thermodynamics.
 

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So I had an idea the other day...If you don't want to dish out the money for a turbo kit atm and are looking for just a little more performance as well as better gas mileage why not just jimmy rig an intercooler to your intake? Now THAT is a cold air intake.

What do you guys think about the idea? [:)~]
It may cool the air going in to the intake but not enough pressure so their is a restriction. You may be better off heat wrapping the exhaust manifold and catylitic-converter. Just my two cents.
 

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while heat soak adding heat is true characteristic of a turbo system, the thing that really adds the majority of the heat to the air is the pressure change, basically adding an intercooler to a NA car and getting a significant temperature drop will break the rules of thermodynamics.
Yes your right! As an engineer I'm a little ashamed of myself!!
pV=MRT
P=Pressure
V=Volume
M=Mass
R=gas constant
T=Temp

If you raise the pressure on the left side of the equation with volume being constant (which we know it is) then the Mass or Temp or both on the right side of the eq must increase to keep the equation balanced.
Mass is fixed in a way by the mass flow rate. The same amount of mass must be entering the system as is leaving.
This leaves a temp increase as the only way to keep the equation balanced.

It's been a few years since college but if I botched this fundamental thermodynamic equation someone just shoot me know, or I mean let me know.

//EDIT
Now I got to thinking about this and when you cool the air down with the IC you are messing with the equation all over again. I screwed up somewhere!! Must be that this is a static equation and we are dealing with a dynamic situation
END EDIT//
 

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Yes your right! As an engineer I'm a little ashamed of myself!!
pV=MRT
P=Pressure
V=Volume
M=Mass
R=gas constant
T=Temp

If you raise the pressure on the left side of the equation with volume being constant (which we know it is) then the Mass or Temp or both on the right side of the eq must increase to keep the equation balanced.
Mass is fixed in a way by the mass flow rate. The same amount of mass must be entering the system as is leaving.
This leaves a temp increase as the only way to keep the equation balanced.

It's been a few years since college but if I botched this fundamental thermodynamic equation someone just shoot me know, or I mean let me know.
You got it right if your assuming air is a ideal gas, which for most cases it can be assumed it is. [thumb]

Calculating this is like calculating the cycle of a steam power plant sort of, where the intercooler is the condesor stack, the turbine(or power producing side) is the exhaust side of the turbo, the water pump is the compressor wheel of the turbo(which uses the power from the turbine), and the actual engine is the heat source.....sort of, except with a steam power plant the water is changing phases (and the air in a turbo system is obviosly not), and the heat source is a bit diffrent, but generally the same. I think it is easier to think of the diffrent engine cycles(not the carnot cycle though), like the rankin cycle.
 

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You got it right if your assuming air is a ideal gas, which for most cases it can be assumed it is. [thumb]
No I got it wrong (see my edit).
I know that the basic principal in that equation is what is happening here but instead of mass and volume I think you need to substitute mass flow rate and volumetric flow rate. Mass flow stays constant but the volumetric flow rate is greater going in to the system.

Please someone set me straight, this is really starting to bother me.
 

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here


Exhaust side:

work= mass flow rate(enthalpy before turbine- enthalpy after turbine + (velocity incoming turbine- velocity of exiting turbine)/2)

For work produced by turbine, which is then transfered to compressor

air intake side of turbo

work= mass flow rate(enthalpy before compressor- enthalpy after intercooler + (velocity incoming compressor- velocity of exiting compressor)/2)

the work for the turbine is positive indicating a production of work, while the work for the compressor is negitive indicating it used energy(they are equal and opposite). The enthalpy for the compressor is where the intercooler makes its power, because the air temp is lowered significantly the enthalpy is lowered. This is how you calculate how much and intercooler helps you.
 

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[hah] Nerds...(jk)LOL Spray your intake pipe with CO2 or (NOS) that will get you the cold air you want!....
 

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Theres a product out there called the S-Max Icetube, They claim its the intercooler for NA Motors. Does it work, eh who knows. Go buy it and let us know
 
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