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So far no one wants to make them, so we are sourcing a wet clutch auto trans to replace the dct, we will advise once we have parts in house to test

owner: Rebel Devil Customs
Red Devil STedan #1
Project NAS-T
I have a 12 SEL 160ishk on it. Immediately after putting new summer tires on my Titanium wheels the DCT crapped on me, Transmission friction element A stuck on. I replaced clutch solenoid A to no avail. Ford of course says it needs clutches, which it does also according to their test, but that doesn't explain the craziness it is displaying or the code. It's not clutch slip I am experiencing. It gets stuck in the wrong gears and has serious trouble launching and accelerating sometimes. Makes some rough noises. On rare occasions it works ok. Sport and manual are locked out when it acts up usually. Manually shifting odd or even gears doesn't seem to prove much. I told them forget the clutches for now, based on the symptoms I described they agreed with me it sounded like a possible TCM. That wasn't it.

Bought my wife an 18 Mazda6 to replace it. Still have the car though and would like to fix it. Now based on the tidbits I've dug up on the Internet it sounds like either clutch levers or more likely the case itself wore out where the clutch levers pivot? I am wondering what you think and what it would cost to have you swap in as late a model junkyard DCT as we can attain at reasonable cost.

I am planning to ask Ford as well but I'm not sure they would put a used one in, and what they would charge. I would consider a manual swap as well but I like the DCT when it works and I'm guessing that would be cheaper?
 

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You have to ground the following cable: Solid Grey with an Orange Stripe. The wire you are looking for will come off of the wire harness/plug that went down to the TCM.

Just ground it to the frame, easy as that...

I just completed the Auto to Manual swap on my car this weekend (1.5 month long project), and that's exactly what I did and the engine starts no problem!

I used the Haynes manual (Page 12-25) to determine that the Solid Grey cable with an Orange Stripe was the cable I needed to ground.

If you need any further assistance with the wiring, I documented my entire swap on my youtube channel, just search youtube for "Ford Focus - Automatic to Manual Transmission Swap | Part 8". In that video I show the car starting and I put the transmission in 1st gear.
This is the wiring diagram my Haynes manual shows:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1KRW7mx47fxLMaPakuowWTjq9TIw1cMGx/view?usp=sharing
 

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jacoghi, im interested in the workaround for the 3500 rpm limit, can you send me the workaround for the wiring you found.?
 

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I just got most of the parts I need to do the swap from a local salvage yard for $371 out the door and I'm collecting the rest of what I need (new clutch, seals and right side CV axle).

My plan is to do the swap using the PCM and wire harness from the automatic to avoid the PCM and key reprogramming at the dealer. If this doesn't work out, I will go ahead and swap these with parts from the doner vehicle.

The wiring to get the car to start looks really straightforward but I have questions about dealing with all of the other remaining issues and am wondering if anyone who is taking the same approach has worked these out yet.

1. Can the 3500 RPM rev limit be addressed with a wiring change? If so, what does this entail.

2. I looked at a wiring diagram for the reversing lights and what happens is the reverse switch is connected to the PCM or the TCM (depending on whether it is the manual or automatic). When in reverse, a network signal is sent to the BCM where an internal (non-serviceable) relay closes and energizes the reversing lamps. So, it seems like you need to bypass all that and connect the reverse switch on the MT to an external relay tapped to the lamp wire connection coming out of the BCM (pin 19 for the 5-door, pin 20 for the 4-door). Is this the most straightforward way to do this?

3. Several posts in this thread talk about using a tune to alleviate some of the issues associated with using the auto PCM with a MT but I haven't seen a list of what the tune accomplishes. It would be nice to have this list along with another one that describes what must be done by wiring. Probably need another list for mods to do using Forscan or Focccus.

4. Is it also possible to get the ABS and cruise working with this type of swap?

5. Can any remaining DTCs be prevented? If so, how.

That's all I can think of for now. More questions may arise when I start swapping parts.
 

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Reprogramming the key would be cheaper, and the manual pcm, would have a Manual specific stock tune in it

owner: Rebel Devil Customs
Red Devil STedan #1
Project NAS-T
 

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Reprogramming the key would be cheaper, and the manual pcm, would have a Manual specific stock tune in it

owner: Rebel Devil Customs
Red Devil STedan #1
Project NAS-T
I see where you're coming from but I already have a SCT tuner and Tom's tune for the automatic. A used PCM would run about $100, same for the harness. $70 to tow it to the dealer plus whatever the dealer is going to charge to program the keys so we're up to about $350. That's what I spent on the tranny and box full of misc manual shifting parts at the salvage yard (they gave me a good deal and I wish I would have asked them how much more to throw in the PCM and harness in case I needed it). I can always go the manual PCM and harness route later if I'm not satisfied with the outcome.
 

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I see where you're coming from but I already have a SCT tuner and Tom's tune for the automatic. A used PCM would run about $100, same for the harness. $70 to tow it to the dealer plus whatever the dealer is going to charge to program the keys so we're up to about $350. That's what I spent on the tranny and box full of misc manual shifting parts at the salvage yard (they gave me a good deal and I wish I would have asked them how much more to throw in the PCM and harness in case I needed it). I can always go the manual PCM and harness route later if I'm not satisfied with the outcome.
Just make sure you have all the safeties in place, don't just bypass them. Which is why I go the OE route on Manual conversions

owner: Rebel Devil Customs
Red Devil STedan #1
Project NAS-T
 

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I finished my swap a couple days ago - at least to the point of being a driveable vehicle. I am taking a bit of a different approach in that I have a manual PCM that I need to put in (waiting on a programmer on order) but I am going to retain the auto wiring harness. Doing this and a couple wiring mods to the harness, I already have the clutch safety/interlock switch wired so it starts normally only when the clutch pedal is depressed but I will need to install and program the manual PCM to get rid of the 3500 rpm limit and traction control (plus the PATS keys) to work. Then a couple more wiring mods to get the reverse lamps and hopefully cruise control working. I have the wiring diagrams for the reverse lamps and cruise and it is just one additional wire for each to be tapped into the PCM connector or possibly just a wire. If wires aren't present at the needed pins, I'm hoping to be able to repin those on the connector with some terminal. If anyone knows the right female terminal ends to use, please let me know. Right now, my best guess is a Delphi GT-150 female 22-20 gauge.

So far, my costs are what I consider to be pretty modest. Parts come to $775 and that is including a PCM programmer and 2-day Motorcraft/FJDS license. If you really want to keep the costs down like, this, you need a good doner car from a cooperative local salvage yard (car-part.com is great for finding a suitable candidate in your vicinity). I found a low mileage tranny for $150 and told them what I was doing and gave them a list of other parts I needed. When I arrived to pick it up, the only thing really missing from the big box of parts I needed was one of the clutch switches, the carrier bearing bracket and one of the CV axles that was trashed upon removal. We went over to the engine and grabbed the bracket that was still attached. They gave me the rest of these parts for another $200 which is a steal considering how long it must have taken to strip them without damaging anything. I did add a new passenger side axle and I also went with a new LUK clutch kit and got new axle seals as well.

I had inquired with my local dealer about giving me a quote to do the manual PCM programming. My plan was to drive it to the dealer with the auto PCM and swap it out for the manual PCM in the parking lot (should take about 5-minutes with the cover left off). Then they could program it there on the spot without a tow. But, they never came back to me with a quote so I take this as them saying they don't want to touch it. That's ok, there are more ways to skin a cat.

This said, even as the car stands, it is a joy to drive compared to the DCT. I highly recommend this job to anyone who is also fed up with their DCT. I would say I had 20-24 hours labor into the job working in my garage using jack stands. Only one full day on a weekend and a couple weeks worth of sessions after work. The information gained on this forum was invaluable, the parts list in particular. A special shout out to sedanRacer who answered a couple of questions via PM!
 

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In this thread, two main approaches are suggested for the engine control side of the swap. That is, either use the auto wiring harness and the auto PCM or change both out for the manual wiring harness and PCM. If you go with the auto components, you can use a tune to remove the 3500 RPM rev limit (which occurs because the auto PCM thinks you are in neutral). However, going this route, there are some systems that you won't be able to retain just via a tune modification. These include reverse lights, cruise control, traction control and hill-start assist. Furthermore, you will have a CEL lit and you will also get error messages show up on the display each time you start your vehicle. If you are fine with not having these things working and decide to go this route and you don't already have a tuner, you will have to purchase one such as the one Tom sells. In the mean time, the car starts and is driveable even with the 3500 RPM limit.

On the other hand, if you go with the manual wiring harness and PCM, you can get everything to work like stock. Going this route, you need a new harness (a little over $200 and most of the junkyard ones cost about the same from what I was seeing), a manual PCM (found one for $44 on eBay). There is a significant amount of labor involved in swapping out the auto harness for the manual one and once you are done, you still need to have the PCM reprogrammed for your correct VIN and PATS keys. Since you can't start the vehicle until it is reprogrammed, you likely also have to factor in the costs of programming and a tow to the dealership unless you have one that is willing to send out a technician to perform this work.

Fortunately, there is another method that I haven't seen documented as of yet and it is sort of a hybrid of the two methods listed above. It involves using a modified auto wiring harness and a used manual PCM from the salvage yard.

As it turns out, the wiring harness for the manual and the auto are very similar in terms of the plugs that attach to the PCM. The auto harness has a similar type connector that branches off the harness and attaches to the TCM. The pinouts on the PCM connector for the two wiring harnesses are very similar and the vast majority of the pins are common to both variants. However, there are a few pins that are different between the two. One of these that is important is pin number 13 that we know carries the Grey/Orange wire that goes to the TCM. We need to tap into that wire and run it to the clutch bottom of travel switch because it is an interlock that keeps the car from starting unless the clutch is depressed. On the auto wiring harness, there are a couple of pins that the manual PCM needs that are unused on the auto. The good thing is that it is possible to add the needed pins to the plug on the connector so you can wire in everything that the manual PCM is expecting. Going this route saves you the effort of uninstalling the auto wiring harness and installing the manual one in addition to the cost of the new harness. Furthermore, you can rob the unused TCM connector for the few terminal ends that you need to repin the PCM connector. In doing so, I retained about 3 inches of wire to splice my own wire to. Once you have everything all hooked up and the PCM reprogrammed can get your reverse lamps and cruise control cancel switch wires hooked up.

One note on the repinning procedure, to remove the terminal ends from the TCM connector, first remove the back of the TCM plug (the cover containing the lever). Then you need a very small flat head jeweler's screwdriver to place in the hole adjacent to the terminal being removed, going from the face side. You are trying to depress the lock tab on the terminal end to get it to release. Once you get it out, before inserting it into the PCM connector, you need to punch out the plastic plugs on the unused locations where you are inserting the salvaged terminal. Then push it in from the back until it locks into place. There are some YouTube vidoes out there on repinning - none specific to a Focus but enough to give you a general idea of what is involved. In addition to tapping into the wire attached to PCM Pin 13 (GY/OG), you will need to add terminals at Pin 42 which is the reverse switch and Pin 43 which is the Cruise Control cancel switch on the clutch. Note that the pinout description on the wiring diagram for the connector (C175B) shows pin 43 as being for the BRAKE PEDAL FORCE FORCE SWITCH. However, if you look at the wiring diagram for the cruise control, it shows Pin 43 on the PCM as CLUTCH PEDAL SW. Both the Brake Pedal Position Switch (BPS) at pin 16 and the clutch pedal switch will cancel the cruise control. Both of these switches make a connection to ground when closed so one wire on the switch goes to ground and the other to the terminal on the PCM connector. Polarity doesn't matter as it is a simple switch.

As an aside, I had considered leaving the auto TCM connector intact and trying to find the terminal ends that are compatible with the PCM connector. One name for these is multi lock terminals and they do make tools to remove these and also to do a factory style crimp. The problem is that there are a LOT of variants for these terminals and they are all slightly different. You need to find one that first is the right size for the male terminal end in the PCM, second, fits into the plug connector and third, has the proper locking mechanism to hold the terminal in place inside the connector. As of yet, I haven't been able to find a source of new terminals of the right type. On top of that, making the tiny crimps to attach them might be a challenge without the factory tool. So, since I never plan to go back to an auto transmission, I figured harvesting them from the TCM connector was the best way to go. EDIT: The terminal part number appears to be TE Connectivity 1394897. This is an obsolete part so it would be tough to find them so it's best to do what I did and just remove some terminals/wires from the unused TCM plug. The extraction tool (TE Connectivity 1452426-1) currently goes for $77 so I'll be sticking with the jeweler's screwdriver or a modified paper clip.

I'm currently still waiting on my programmer to reprogram the VIN and keys into my manual PCM but once I have that done, I will report back on the results.
 

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Update: My programmer arrived last evening (VXDIAG VCX Nano for IDS/Ford/Mazda). I have seen some nightmare reviews on this and similar devices about people having lots of issues getting it to be recognized properly by the laptop. There is talk of having to use a virtual machine(VMWare), reverting to Windows 7, making registry edits, changing the sytstem time/date and those sorts of things just to get these devices to work. Well, ignore all of that and install VXManager from Allscanner. It has the drivers that are needed to make it work and you can test that the device is working properly before getting the required FJDS license from Motorcraft. You'll want to do this because the most cost effective license (at $50) is only good for two days. Make sure you also have the FJDS software from Ford up and running before you acquire a license key.

There are several video guides out there that show how to program the used manual PCM and keys so I won't get into that in detail. Note that one of the last steps in the process is to get the PCM and BCM talking to one another with what is called a parameter reset. The car won't start without doing this so it is a vital step.

At any rate, I've only had a single test drive but I do know that the following are working:

1. Manual PCM has the correct VIN/Mileage
2. Car Starts! 2 working keys.
3. Clutch safety switch/interlock works (car won't start until clutch pedal is depressed)
4. No more 3500RPM limit
5. Cruise Control works! You can cancel it using the steering wheel cancel button or by hitting the brake or clutch pedal.
6. The display shows the upshift message so the info screen also knows it is a 5-speed. However, for some reason, the PRNDS text is still there.

The reverse lamp wire is connected so I will have to confirm this evening that they are illuminating when in reverse.

I still have a few things to check out but I'm happy with how things look at the moment so no regrets about the time/effort/$ to go this next step with getting the manual PCM programmed and working. Once I'm satisfied with everything, I'll probably just sell the VXDIAG programmer so I can recoup some of that cost.
 

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The reverse lamps are indeed working. This is what the back of the PCM plug looks like with the terminals robbed from the TCM before splicing in the wires running to the clutch and transmission switches.
1214191456.jpg
 

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Very cool!
did the software let pick the components or does the vin determine like in ids. Maybe the fjds software is better
As far as programming the PCM goes, from what I understand, IDS and FJDS are similar. FJDS just doesn't have all the diagnostic functions available in IDS but you don't need those for this job and a short term FJDS license is much less expensive. When programming, you just enter the PCM part number and FJDS pretty much picks up everything else including getting the correct VIN transferred into the used manual PCM. There is a trick to doing this however so look for the videos on programming a used Ford PCM - there are several of them out there. Basically you start the process like normal but you ignore the initial prompts to put the key in the ON position so you can manually enter the PCM part info. After all that was done, I did go into Focccus to change the transmission setting to a 5-speed. I think that is what allowed me to get rid of the PRNDS on the display.

So, do you have your car running with the MTX75 and the auto PCM?

One tip on the wiring. Maybe there is a better way to get the various switch wires from the pedals through the firewall but I ended up running them over to the grommet for the wiring loom for the fuse box under the glove compartment (for the ground wires, I just grounded them inside the vehicle). You can make a grommet threading tool by taking an 18 inch length of steel brake line and cutting one end to a very sharp point. You lube it up and poke the sharp end through the grommet and then thread your wire through. Once through and secured, pull the threading tool out.
 

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Yes have it running with the auto pcm.
Bought a new 2008 manual pcm with the rest of the parts , might try your programming method tho.
Had a guy try to change it in IDS to manual, it drops connection to that part of pcm ?
He couldn’t do much.
Van runs and drives fine until around 15-20 feels like timing getting retarded.
It’s a transit connect, same car as 2011 Focus ,almost
 

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My understanding was that with a new one, you didn't have to trick it in IDS. Dealers will tell you that a used PCM can't be used but that's probably because the don't or won't use the trick. Perhaps they just want to sell you a new $400 part which is 10 times what they are going for on eBay, used. I didn't have to select manual in the FJDS. Once you input the part number, it picks up from the PCM that it is a manual and you just confirm it one one of the next screens. I got my PCM off of eBay but I had to do some research to know that I was getting one that came from a 5-speed because they don't always tell you in the description (and lots of times, the description is wrong).

When running mine with the auto PCM before I swapped it out, not only was there the 3500 rpm limiter but there also seemed to be something funky going on when I downshifted into 3rd gear. It was like the engine bogged down as if I had shifted into the wrong gear. That went away once I installed and programmed the manual PCM. Other than that it was very driveable if you didn't hit the 3500 ceiling.
 
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