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Discussion Starter #1
This may be a little long-winded but it's completely baffling so please bear with me:

Every time I drive my car in the rain, it runs fine for about the first 2-5 miles into the drive, but then out of nowhere will suffer an extreme loss of power to where even heavy application of the throttle will net almost ZERO acceleration, and dropping it down a gear or two will get it to accelerate like it has maybe 5 or 6 horsepower at most. The car gets louder, but forward momentum is absolutely minimal. It's infuriating and IMO incredibly dangerous.

Now usually when this happens, it doesn't throw a code/turn on the CEL, and I turn the car all the way off and back on, and it then runs normally for the remainder of the drive, like a simple "reset" fixes things. However, about 2 months ago when this happened and I started the car back up, it threw a CEL which later on my scanner said that it was a Cam Position Sensor fault.

Seeing as my car has over 100k miles, I bought both cam sensors and replaced them without questioning whether they really needed replaced or not (they weren't too expensive for OEM, so I figured it couldn't hurt to replace). The CEL was gone, but the car continued to go into "limp mode" when driven in the rain each time after replacing the sensors.

Today was rainy and it happened this morning, I shut the car off, restarted, and continued on my way to work as usual. However, after work, still raining, it went into limp mode again a few miles into my drive and when I got the chance, I shut the car off and restarted it. This time it was still in limp mode and the CEL was on. I shut it off again, restarted, still in limp mode. Repeated the process another 2 or 3 times, still in limp mode, so I said screw it and just limped it home.

I hooked up my scanner, said Cam Position Sensor fault again, I tried erasing the code but it kept coming back, so now I have the battery disconnected and am hoping reconnecting it in a bit will perhaps help the (I assume false/faulty) cam sensor code being thrown.

Regardless of the cam sensor code, does anyone have the slightest clue what the hell could be going on with my car? Luckily it isn't my only vehicle, but it is my work commuter (about 72 miles round trip daily) and having to deal with this every time I drive it in rainy weather is just ridiculous, and as I mentioned before, pretty damn dangerous.

I don't know what the issue is, but geez, I'd think a car built in 2014 should be operable in wet weather.[:(!][:(!][:(!] I've never had this issue with any other vehicle I've ever driven and it's driving me crazy.[bigcry]
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Last night I hooked the battery back up and the CEL was gone.

However, I did take a look at my wiring harness where it runs down in front of the intake manifold and not only does it NOT have the protective plastic wiring loom (build date of 03/14), but I was able to pull it out just enough to see that the sharp manifold edge has completely cut into the tape, exposing the actual wires inside.

I'll need to check again with an inspection mirror to see if the actual copper wiring itself is exposed or even broken as I couldn't pull the harness out far enough to check that specific detail, but I could see the actual colors of the wires' outer coatings.

Not only that, but on the manifold's sharp edge, I could even see indents along the edge witg what looked like a bit of sea-green corrosion along the indents from the individual wires themselves that have rubbed on the edge over time, which leads me to believe that the actual copper itself is exposed, if not cut in half in some spots.

Either way, I think that is likely the culprit, and with my car being a 2014 with almost 112k miles, it's obviously well out of warranty, but this is a major problem from Ford themselves and because of them, my car is not only dangerous to me and everyone around me, but also my 2- and 4-year-old sons when they're in the car.

Where do I go from here???
 

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Your build date of 3/2014 just underscores what I have seen. Many cars that fall outside of Ford's cutoff for this TSB lack the protective plastic loom on the wiring harness.

If the copper wire is not broken and if you can gain enough clearance to wrap electrical tape around the bare copper, then you can repair it yourself. The problem, as you have found, is that it is really difficult to get your hands in such a tight space to work. If you are able to tape the bare wires, remember to put a protective plastic loom over the harness so this does not happen again.

If an individual wire is badly damaged or broken, then this unfortunately becomes a skilled repair best left to the dealer.


The official repair method from the TSB:

(1) When repairing damaged circuits, it is necessary to first disconnect the electrical connectors for the HPP,
MAF/IAT, EVAP purge valve, ECT, HO2S11, HO2S12, FRP, CMP11, CMP12, VCT11, VCT12 and all 4 coil on
plugs (COPs). Refer to the Wiring Diagram for component locations.

(2) Remove the air cleaner assembly. Refer to Workshop (WSM), Section 303-12.

(3) Remove the bolt from ground G103.

(4) With the engine harness retainers disconnected from the top of the engine, the engine harness can be lifted
and moved forward enough to gain access to circuits in the chafing location.

(5) Additional wire must be added to the repaired circuits to maintain proper circuit length. Refer to the Wiring
Diagram Section 5 and use the solder method.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oiy, that does NOT sound fun. I have absolutely no problems tackling mechanical issues myself, but when it comes to electrical fixes that are beyond just "disconnect and reconnect", I'd rather send it off to a pro.

But something tells me this is a costly, time-consuming fix that should honestly be covered by Ford. It amazes me that this isn't a recall with how widespread of an issue it seems to be, especially with how utterly dangerous it is.
 

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This reminds me. I need to split a chunk of heater hose and wrap the harness at this spot before I have an issue.

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Discussion Starter #8
Looking on FordParts.com, a new replacement wiring harness is less than $200 (or even better, less than $160 through 12/31 with the 20% off discount). Other than about 20+ connections and a few that are probably a bit of a pain to get to, is it basically just plug-and-play? Or would I have to have a Ford dealer reprogram/reflash some things after I installed the new harness?

If it's something I can just swap out myself and be good to go after the final connector is snapped in, I feel like a new harness wouldn't be the worst idea...
 

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Other option would be a good junkyard part off of a wrecked Focus. This is not a part that sees much wear other than in the area you know to scrutinize.
 

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Looking on FordParts.com, a new replacement wiring harness is less than $200 (or even better, less than $160 through 12/31 with the 20% off discount). Other than about 20+ connections and a few that are probably a bit of a pain to get to, is it basically just plug-and-play? Or would I have to have a Ford dealer reprogram/reflash some things after I installed the new harness?



If it's something I can just swap out myself and be good to go after the final connector is snapped in, I feel like a new harness wouldn't be the worst idea...
That looks like the way to go. You shouldn't have to reflash anything. I would erase any existing codes before install and pull codes after to make sure the new harness isn't causing any.

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I can't emphasize enough for everyone to perform the TSB 14-0215 preventative maintenance. My car (2013 ford focus SE with 250,000km / 155,000 miles) was severely suffering when driving in damp conditions. My gas mileage suffered severely also and was left having to avoid highways and learned to press on the pedal to a certain "sweet" spot in order to go to and from work. I finally put a very good code reader on the car only to find out I had several codes (p0122, p2111, p2112, p2135, p0123, p0420). Of course that was a lot of codes but I started off with replacing the throttle pedal with no success. I then proceeded with replacing the throttle body, again, no changes. I then went on by thinking the PCM was the issue so I opened up the enclosure, found a few sketchy junctions but nothing that was obvious and ended up taking the two connectors off the PCM, clean them and add good electrical grease on the connections. After all that work, still no improvement.

Finally I came upon this post (btw, THANK YOU) about the TSB 14-0215. Friend of mine and I examined the area in question but found the fabric sheathing to be immaculate even without the split wire loom there. I still went on and opened her up and bingo, 5 severed wires... to tell you the truth, I am not quite sure how the car was still running but 2 of the wires were for the APP2 sensor on the throttle body. Fixed all wires, add 2 layers of split loom almost all the way down to one of the wire clamp (holdster) and taped the bejesus out of it with electrical tape Now the car runs like a champ, back on the highway with no issues and great gas mileage again. :D:D:D:D

Thanks again for this post and Please go and open that section up just to be on the safe side, well worth the hour or two it would take to make sure those wires are intact.

Cheers
 

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