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What bump stop?
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I have the torsen. Either one will be a million times better then stock. Definately a must add for any focus, stock or otherwise.

I personally chose the Torsen over the Quaife because it has a bigger bias, 3:1 instead of the 2:1 like the Quaife.
 

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Focused Focus
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Its a great improvement for cornering and track use. I keep the Torsen's in stock as well.
 

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Leave it stock?
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what does the 3:1 and 2:1 bias mean?

also im gonna get a LSD as well, i hate the stupid 1 wheel drive lol.
 

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Busy Monkey
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4,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
b16sir1991, how much for your Torsen's with shipping to 95383? I'll keep you in mind if I ever can afford it. Thanks!
 

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Leave it stock?
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i thought it sent power to both wheels? lol
 

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Either will send power to both wheels. Under normal driving conditions they will bias the power as close to 50/50 as possible, unless you get into conditions where you really start to work the differential you won't even notice its there. In bad weather or track driving its worth its weight in gold IMO...
 

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Captain TMI
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i thought it sent power to both wheels? lol
No, limited slip differentials apply torque to the wheel with the most traction. In a straight line, both wheels will get power if I'm not mistaken- or at least it feels that way.

Here's a Wiki explanation Limited Slip Differentials
 

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Registered
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^
So yes, in conditions where both wheels have equal or nearly equal grip it will bias 50/50, and as one wheel slips the power is sent to the other.
 

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The key word is limited, it will let the differential slip a little so its not like a locker where you get full power to both wheels, but yes it does distribute power to both wheels, unlike a regular differential where all the power goes to the wheel that has the least resistance.

I had a limited slip in a truck and i almost never had to shift it into 4X4 because it got great traction off road going slow, but on road, especially over 40 mph the thing was notorious for wanting to hydroplane or breaking the back end loose when accellerating when the roads were wet or slippery. Im not really sure about the physics behind it, but thats the way it worked for the truck, keep in mind though the truck was rwd in 2X4, which is what you use on road, and there isnt much weight over those tires.
 

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^^im guessing the car would get a lot better traction with the limited slip differential, unlike the truck because the weight over the tires
 

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What bump stop?
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ok, 2:1 and 3:1 bias....

2:1 bias means that the wheel with the most grip will receive twice as much torque as the wheel without.

Same with 3:1. The wheel that has the most grip will get three times as much power as the slipping wheel. so say the wheel slipping will hold 20 ft lbs of torque, the gripping wheel wil get as much as 60 ft lbs transferred to it.

As for ice and snow, I couldn't tell you how it would effect the car if it is NA, but if you have a turbo or a decent amount of power, it is hell. If I'm going through a turn on snow/ice and happen to go into boost it'll pull the car in whatever direction I was going when the boost was applied.

In dry conditions though it is great, the car just pulls through the turns.
 

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^
That could also have something to do with your RT615s not being the best tire to drive on in the winter...[hihi]

When I was still DDing my Focus it was amazing in the snow with a LSD and snow tires. The car went precisely where I wanted it to, no control problems, no rear end slip. I recall one night I was passing 4x4 equipped vehicles on the interstate with ease...although I sort of get the feeling that most drivers in the greater Cleveland area are just idiots and forget how to drive in the snow. That night most of them were just pulling off to the side, slowing down to 15 and putting their hazards on.
 

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What bump stop?
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1,947 Posts
^
That could also have something to do with your RT615s not being the best tire to drive on in the winter...[hihi]

hahaha. Yeah, but I've been running my crappy P6's for the past two months. Now, when we got hit with the first snow and I still had my 615's on the car I couldn't even move, that sucked.

I don't even like driving on the 615's in the rain [hihi]
 

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i found that these cars come stock with teh torsen

Front and rear axles

* HMMWV or Humvee
* Subaru Impreza STI

Front axle only

* Acura Integra Type-R
* Alfa Romeo: GT, 147 Q2
* Honda Civic Si (06-current)
* Nissan Sentra SE-R Spec-V
* Oldsmobile Calais W41 (7 cars equipped from the factory, C41 option code)
* Oldsmobile Achieva W41 (7-10 cars equipped from the factory, C41 option code)
* Rover 220 Coupe Turbo
* Mazdaspeed 3

Rear axle only

* Alfa Romeo 164 Q4
* Alfa Romeo 155 Q4
* Ford FX4
* Honda S2000
* Lancia Delta Integrale
* Lexus IS300
* Mazda Miata/MX-5 (rear) ('94+ manual models)
* Mazda RX-8
* Subaru Impreza WRX STI (2007)
* Toyota Supra
 

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Busy Monkey
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4,461 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Thanks everyone, I think that pretty much settles it, I'm adding the torsen diff to my "when I can afford it" list.

You guys rock!

P.S.
Thanks Cruz for digging up that info
 

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Sückn' n Blown
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7,747 Posts
i found that these cars come stock with teh torsen
Don't forget, they may not necessarily be a Torsen brand LSD. Its kind of like Kleenex; more than one manufacturer, but they all tend to call it same thing. [;)]

And don't forget, the Focus RS came with a Quaife brand LSD.
 
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