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I have a question and can't seem to find a direct answer. I've had my focus since August 6th. It had 2 miles when I got it. I'm now at the mid 800s. I drive roughly 4-12 miles a day I believe or so. Roughly. I'm seldom on the highway. Perhaps maybe 2 times a week for about 5 miles give or take. I do drive a decent amount of hills. The one is a speed limit of 45mph. I'm on that everyday it's probably a mile or three long. Maybe less I'd. But anyway, my towns speed limits go between 20-45mph. So when would you say is a good time to change my oil? What is the best oil to use? Also is that when I would rotate my tires? Also, with winter right around the corner, is there any products I can put on my car to fight against scrapes from salt? Finally, is there a product that is safe if it were to hit my paint that I can spray or put on my windows to either stop ice from forming or to melt it and snow? Thank you!
 

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Most info I've heard says to just change it at the first designated change interval (~7500 miles). I changed mine between 1500-2000 just for the hell of it, but it sounds like you'll be fine if you don't do that. I always prefer to use full synthetic (traditionally Mobil 1, but this time I tried Pennzoil Ultra Platinum, based on a few reviews on here).
 

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Claybarring and waxing your car before winter might be helpful to add some extra protection, but if you are worried about heavy scrapes, that probably won't be enough.
 

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I meant scratches lol. I'm terrible at typing on my phone lol. I wash and wax about every two weeks.
 

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Strichmädchen & Koks
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How long is the vehicle running during each trip? That will be a big consideration in how often to change the oil.

If it very rarely gets up to operating temperatures (and stays there for 10-15 minutes), water can build up in the oil as it's not being burned off since the engine isn't getting hot enough. Condensation often forms inside the engine, and it's no big deal when it gets up to operating temperature as it all gets heated out. This will be especially true in the winter.

If the vast majority of trips do not get the vehicle up to operating temperature, I would change between 3000 and 5000 miles. The best way to know for sure is to have an oil analysis done and see what's in the oil, that way you can see if you can go longer or need to change it sooner.

Also, lots of stop and go traffic can mean shorter change intervals are needed.

The BEST way to be SURE about your intervals is to have an oil analysis done a few times in a row. If it comes back looking good then make your next oil change a little later (assuming driving habits are still similar). If it looks bad, change it sooner. Once you get an idea of what intervals are best you can stop the analyses.
 

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Even if you do not ever put the milage on the car, the recommended oil change interval is ONE YEAR.
So say you only put 1.500 to 2,000 miles on in an entire year
After one year you should change the oil per the owner's guide.
 

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If you are worried about salt corrosion (I think you are?) you can get the car "oil sprayed" or "rust proofed".

Basically, they spray old engine oil on the undercarriage to keep things water tight.
 

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#dailydriven
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How long is the vehicle running during each trip? That will be a big consideration in how often to change the oil.

If it very rarely gets up to operating temperatures (and stays there for 10-15 minutes), water can build up in the oil as it's not being burned off since the engine isn't getting hot enough. Condensation often forms inside the engine, and it's no big deal when it gets up to operating temperature as it all gets heated out. This will be especially true in the winter.

If the vast majority of trips do not get the vehicle up to operating temperature, I would change between 3000 and 5000 miles. The best way to know for sure is to have an oil analysis done and see what's in the oil, that way you can see if you can go longer or need to change it sooner.

Also, lots of stop and go traffic can mean shorter change intervals are needed.

.
I would say this pretty much nails it. I would say change it every 6 months or so if you are not putting the miles on it. Oil breaks down even if the car is just sitting there or getting low miles put on it.
 

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I would say this pretty much nails it. I would say change it every 6 months or so if you are not putting the miles on it. Oil breaks down even if the car is just sitting there or getting low miles put on it.
I understand if there's water in the oil.....but if it's clean oild just sitting in the engine, how will it break down? Not trying to be smart. Curious actually. Occasionally I store some oil in my cold garage in the winter to stock up for oil changes. As well in my hot garage during summer months.
 

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If you really want to have no salt corrosion, find a heated garage.
Typically some apartment buildings (in the Northern USA) have the lower level as indoor parking. Usually it stays warm enough that any ice melts, and any water evaporates.
If you can also rinse you car off when you want in there that is a huge plus.
Spray rinse the underside after being out in the salted streets. Then lettting it dry is the total solution to no rust.

I realize this seems like a luxury.. but it is one I have and love. I would never again live in any apartment building (in the North) without it having such parking facilities.
 

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I understand if there's water in the oil.....but if it's clean oild just sitting in the engine, how will it break down? Not trying to be smart. Curious actually. Occasionally I store some oil in my cold garage in the winter to stock up for oil changes. As well in my hot garage during summer months.
As mentioned above, when a car is operated for only a very short time and then shut off before it reaches and maintains a normal operating temperature, water condensation never has a chance to burn off. The water mixes with combustion byproducts to form acid. The oil has a finite amount of reserve alkalinity to combat this (called TBN or Total Base Number) Once that is depleted, the acid can damage the engine.

My personal recommendation is to never leave oil in an engine for a year regardless of how you drive your car. My limit is 6 months.

Regarding your last point, storing new motor oil in sealed containers in your garage should not be a problem since there is no water or combustion byproduct present. Most modern motor oil has an approximate 5 year shelf life if stored at room temperature.
 

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#dailydriven
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I understand if there's water in the oil.....but if it's clean oild just sitting in the engine, how will it break down? Not trying to be smart. Curious actually. Occasionally I store some oil in my cold garage in the winter to stock up for oil changes. As well in my hot garage during summer months.
As mentioned above, when a car is operated for only a very short time and then shut off before it reaches and maintains a normal operating temperature, water condensation never has a chance to burn off. The water mixes with combustion byproducts to form acid. The oil has a finite amount of reserve alkalinity to combat this (called TBN or Total Base Number) Once that is depleted, the acid can damage the engine.

My personal recommendation is to never leave oil in an engine for a year regardless of how you drive your car. My limit is 6 months.

Regarding your last point, storing new motor oil in sealed containers in your garage should not be a problem since there is no water or combustion byproduct present. Most modern motor oil has an approximate 5 year shelf life if stored at room temperature.
This ^.

If the car is just sitting there it's going to build condensation from not being operated and aloud to reach the operating temperature. Plus, and this is just a personal thought but i would think that the additives would deteriate of time as well.
 

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Dont most gas engines get to operating temp pretty quickly these days? Even when it was 10 degrees here last winter my old truck had the coolant reach normal temp in about 10 minutes at normal driving pace.

Transmission took longer but I had to bypass the transmission warming effect of the tranny oil going through the radiator due to a manufacturing defect in the 2005-2008 xterras.
 

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If you really want to have no salt corrosion, find a heated garage.
Typically some apartment buildings (in the Northern USA) have the lower level as indoor parking. Usually it stays warm enough that any ice melts, and any water evaporates.
If you can also rinse you car off when you want in there that is a huge plus.
Spray rinse the underside after being out in the salted streets. Then lettting it dry is the total solution to no rust.

I realize this seems like a luxury.. but it is one I have and love. I would never again live in any apartment building (in the North) without it having such parking facilities.
Actually, heated garages are worse for corrosion. Rust needs 3 things: moisture, salt and heat. This is why most corrosion occurs in the spring. Lots of moisture, salt still on the road, and rises in outdoor temperatures.
 

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If you really want to have no salt corrosion, find a heated garage.
Heat accelerates corrosion. Rust is due to a chemical reaction that oxidizes the metal. Heat facilitates this reaction and most other chemical reactions. Think about brake and exhaust parts, they rust first.

Washing your car often is the best thing you can do to prevent rust. Oil undercoating or rust preventative sprays are good too, but don't let someone sell you on the idea of drilling holes to get the stuff inside the panels. That leaves bare metal unprotected after the protectant washes off and could let water into a place that has insufficient drainage.
 

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Actually, heated garages are worse for corrosion. .
Hah hah hah And I suppose you have tested this 'theory'?

Well I have and i can tell you NO ONE who parks in any of the 'heated garages' I have ever parked in over 25 years gets any rust.
So your theory is worthless IMO.

Plus I love the fact I have the only spotlessly clean car in the middle of Winter driving.. All the Time!
Everyone else's car is covered with a grey layer of crud but my car looks clean as new.
Even after 30 days straight of below freezing ,my car is clean and shiny. (usually when it gets above freezing a bunch of folks get their pigsty cars washed.. If it stays below freezing, very few will. as they do not want the car frozen solid!)
 

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Strichmädchen & Koks
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Hah hah hah And I suppose you have tested this 'theory'?

Well I have and i can tell you NO ONE who parks in any of the 'heated garages' I have ever parked in over 25 years gets any rust.
So theory is worthless when you just pull it out of your bunghole. [goofydrunk]
My mom parks in a heated garage and her Charger has plenty of rust on it.
 

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Hah hah hah And I suppose you have tested this 'theory'?

Well I have and i can tell you NO ONE who parks in any of the 'heated garages' I have ever parked in over 25 years gets any rust.
So your theory is worthless IMO.

Plus I love the fact I have the only spotlessly clean car in the middle of Winter driving.. All the Time!
Everyone else's car is covered with a grey layer of crud but my car looks clean as new.
Even after 30 days straight of below freezing ,my car is clean and shiny. (usually when it gets above freezing a bunch of folks get their pigsty cars washed.. If it stays below freezing, very few will. as they do not want the car frozen solid!)
People who have heated garage always have nice, well cared for cars that are regularly washed.

Basing your scientific opinions off of casual observations is [:)][:)][:)][:)][:)][:)].
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem07/chem07356.htm

http://news.google.com/newspapers?n...pYY1AAAAIBAJ&sjid=56IFAAAAIBAJ&pg=4748,955512
 
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