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I feel it's more like they never got experience tightening down anything at all. It doesn't take long to figure out the difference in plastic and metal. Problem is, they don't take enough time to think to translate their metal part experience into the plastic world to tone it way down. I don't think I've ever stripped a plastic part out ever. Meaning not rocket science if I can do it. Now break plastic posts that are barbed, yeah, countless. I tend to do away with them anyway to install nuts and bolts to hold things and to not pay 6X for plastic parts made to break if you take them back off once. So, lots of custom modded parts on my stuff but you can pull them 20 times if you want.

I still don't torque maybe 90% of the parts I install, only those like head bolts and major engine parts (crank, rod caps) and anything that angle torques.

There's nothing wrong with asking about a simple torque, it's when somebody insults while whining and asking for it to get people to work for you for free..............what sets me off.

From OP............

'...it was the only place on the internet that had the torque for my transmission Drain and fill plugs.'

Inferred we did not make the grade. We failed at dressing little children in the morning.

(sigh)
 
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I personally like to use torque specs. Not normally on drain plugs but definitely on suspension parts. Many vehicles today also have torque to yield bolts how fun.
Absolutely nothing wrong with better safe than sorry.

The shop I worked in we had to use a torque wrench on lug nuts.

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Grey Friar
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I didn't mean to sound like a torque-wrench-snob or anything, because back-in-the-day I used to use manuals to torque everything. It was a shop requirement, and that was just the exacting way I did stuff for myself, too. It didn't take long to get tired of double-checking everything, especially when you disassembled/reassembled some part just a few days before and/or many times before... then if memory didn't work good enough to remember the exact numbers, I'd use the "German-engineer" method on all accessory nuts/studs and bolts, and body parts. I no longer rebuild engines/trans, and suspension work is left to my son (after my broken neck and two fused vertebrae), so almost everything I do on a car for the past several years is the quick-fix type of stuff, and no need to open a manual for what I do now.

For street use, I think it's fine to use the good-and-tight method for steel to steel wheel nuts, or forged alloy wheels and steel nuts... you just have to be sane about it... it's not a delicate part or a test-of-strength. IMO, when you have a lightweight cast alloy wheel and steel nuts (especially if alloy nuts) that's when a torque-wrench is needed. That said, I'd never criticize anyone for properly torquing wheel nuts... to me, it just means they are patient and careful. But drain plugs?

A pet peeve: the nuts/bolts/studs I always HATED most are underneath, external, largish, alloy Allen-head bolts going into alloy, or worse, dissimilar-metal Allen-to-part (or really, any external Allen-head anything), especially, if the car is into middle-age. They are evil.
 
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