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I misspoke on PSI vs velocity, but some of these other posts are just gibberish.

The danger with the brake booster vacuum line is pouring it in too fast and hydrolocking the motor. The bigger the line, the greater the risk. You can pour it slowly to prevent that, but some people got bad advice and dumped it in too fast.

www.s10forum.com/threads/seafoam-locked-up-engine.145374/

i did pore it fast, but i thought that was the way to do it. i guess i was reading what some *******'s, who have never done this, where saying. i hate when guys tell someone how to do something, BUT have never done it themselves
 

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Some few of us don't have to do a thing to be able to do it right the first time almost all the time. I'm sorry you are not one. You certainly misspoke on PSI vs. velocity as they do not impinge on each other virtually at all other than indirectly here. You don't refer to vacuum as PSI either as it is a negative, it measures in Hg. When you talk with the two words connected you are already messing up.

Go to an aquarium supply or pet store and get either a plastic or brass (better) metering valve for metering air to an aquarium setup. They make excellent metering valves to deliver just enough fluid or gaseous vapor to not hurt anything. And cheap. I came up with that one over 30 years ago before any youtube existed and before ever trying the idea (unlike you I KNEW it would work), to make a vacuum metering setup for HVAC controls on a Tempo to avoid buying the stupid OEM HVAC control unit which ran $150 back in the day and new ones broke in a year. Fixed for like $10 total and I ran it for several years with no issues. Yeah, it's more lawn mower to you but I made over a $100 bill back then and yes, it was weird like you said. Don't care, I get parts in toilet supply stores if I have to (I HAVE) to make things work and not have to mess with them again. More weird to you, aquarium stores carry activated charcoal which can be used to rebuild carbon canisters instead of buying them at astronomical prices. BTDT.

'The bigger the line, the greater the risk.'

Correct if you simply dump in to fill whatever line size you have there, the idea is NOT to do that, you meter it out slow enough to not feed a solid lug of liquid. Just like you do when charging a/c up, you can break the compressor by feeding too much at one time.

Risk is usually humanly modifiable, the thing is to do it ahead of time in your head. Don't wait for youtube to tell you that. If something sounds wrong work it in your head and don't listen to a hundred others telling you what to do. You're doing it for YOU not them. Why I commonly work out of the box, the norm being full throttle rocking stupid now.
 

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Lol, I believe this show is over.
I misspoke on PSI vs velocity, but some of these other posts are just gibberish.

The danger with the brake booster vacuum line is pouring it in too fast and hydrolocking the motor. The bigger the line, the greater the risk. You can pour it slowly to prevent that, but some people got bad advice and dumped it in too fast.

www.s10forum.com/threads/seafoam-locked-up-engine.145374/

i did pore it fast, but i thought that was the way to do it. i guess i was reading what some ***'s, who have never done this, where saying. i hate when guys tell someone how to do something, BUT have never done it themselves
You are absolutely one of if not the most ignorant members that I've come across. What you just said has NOTHING to do with the vacuum line chosen despite what you insist. If you do the same thing and full on spray without pausing in the throttle body(basically the biggest vacuum line) as CRC recommends or in the tiniest vacuum line you can find the same result could theoretically happen especially since the motor is being bogged down and is at very low RPM when being inundated with liquid. If you don't follow the instructions then you can expect bad results.
Just because src153 says it it doesn't mean that it's so and in this case it definitely isn't.
You being dismissive to other members with your "blah blah blah" comment shows how unintelligent you are and how unable you are to debate like an adult man(or woman). You not providing any logical or applicable facts means you have no point.
You misspoke indeed. That seems to be a common theme with you.
 

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amc49 is a long time chemicals hater who shouldn't be on any chemicals thread, but he likes to poison the well. I doubt he's ever used Seafoam, or done many of his other claims.

As for the CRC cleaner, STP makes a better product that self regulates its flow. It was mentioned recently on the "additives and flushes" thread.
 

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"better" is an opinion when choosing chemical additives or cleaners unless based on physical measureable results conducted in a side by side test with all conditions being equal.
Just because you like the idiot proof STP doesn't make it a better product. CRC is known for making PREMIUM products while STP has always generally been regarded as the budget or el cheapo choice though there are a few exceptions.
 

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These chemicals are of minimal benefit IMO. I got my Focus with 13k miles on it. Used a can of CRC intake valve cleaner just before the next two oil changes (3k mile intervals). At 20k I pulled the intake manifold and was disappointed to find a fair amount of buildup on the valves for cylinders 1 and 2. Maybe CRC helped a little? If it did, it was mainly for cylinders 3 and 4. Which I guess makes sense since 3 &4 are closer to the throttle body maybe they got more of the CRC.
In any case, with a higher mileage Focus, best way to clean them is to pull the manifold, soak the valves, and scrub. Once they're clean, do yourself a favor and delete the PCV (vent to atmosphere) or run oil catch cans.
 

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These chemicals are of minimal benefit IMO. I got my Focus with 13k miles on it. Used a can of CRC intake valve cleaner just before the next two oil changes (3k mile intervals). At 20k I pulled the intake manifold and was disappointed to find a fair amount of buildup on the valves for cylinders 1 and 2. Maybe CRC helped a little? If it did, it was mainly for cylinders 3 and 4. Which I guess makes sense since 3 &4 are closer to the throttle body maybe they got more of the CRC.
In any case, with a higher mileage Focus, best way to clean them is to pull the manifold, soak the valves, and scrub. Once they're clean, do yourself a favor and delete the PCV (vent to atmosphere) or run oil catch cans.
Oil separators are a great idea. I use them on my 2014 GT. They catch more oil than you would think they would.
 

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Do none of you geniuses ever think of parking sideways on hill to get help from gravity?
You're a total condescending simpleton src153. You have no place on this or any other forum. Perhaps one of the administrators or moderators will see you for what you are and ban you. We can only hope.
catmagnet2016 didn't even know getting cleaner to 1 & 2 was an issue until he inspected the actual valves.
Interesting how now all of a sudden you are so concerned with the OP's experience level. You had no problem going way off topic.
 

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Again out of context for the OPs experience level. It's not that hard to stay on topic.
Actually, it's on topic. The oil separators help keep the carbon deposits from forming on the valves and the separators don't even require tools in most cases to install. I'd say a toolless install that's simply plug and play is at a skill level for anyone.
 

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There's a cluster of user names that follow each other around, liking each other's posts. I suspect they're all the same guy. Judging by join date, he's been at it for years. He could have hundreds of identities by now. And he uses new names, recently joined, to post fake questions, and then replies under older names to his own fake questions.

"My name is Legion; for we are many."
 

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Ive had a can of crc valve and turbo cleaner sitting in my car for like 2 years now that im going to wind up using at some point.
I couldnt see my valves but when i did my sparkplugs i could see some stuff on my piston heads thru the holes so i think its safe to assume there is stuff on them.
I got to pick up another endoscope for a real look at them.
 

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There's nothing at all wrong with chemicals and I use them all day long, I just want them to DO SOMETHING other than blow smoke up my -ss.

When I worked parts nothing made me sadder than to see people making minimum wage forking over great portions of it to use junk that will NOT do ANYTHING. But your head says it does. ???!! Pointing out the (YOUR) true problem. Provided you are clear minded enough to not LIE TO YOURSELF. Like in post #35.

I am likely at some point going to be wrong about a few chemicals as they all cannot possibly be bad. So don't go wagging GDI intake issues at me, I'm not talking about model specific specialized problems here. But having grilled chemical reps over and over, the clearest thing you get if they really and I mean REALLY open up to you is that most of the chemicals they sell do NOTHING and they then end it with 'I have to do SOMETHING for a living just like you'.

I for one practice NOT using the chemicals and have never in some 45+ years now of having cars all around me that have to run and keep running until they scrap at the yards and me the only guy the cars ever get worked on by. I'm not stupid, if something did work that well I would have known it long ago and used it religiously.

I've never had fuel injector issues ever. Any rough idle I can fix permanently in minutes using no chemicals at all. No startup rattle at all and I can cure it with one change of the oil anyway if it did. ATX lasts forever. I fix any coolant leaks instantly, not doing so leads you deeper into chemical world still often with zero result. I can't kill the engines using Walmart non-syn oil and at 9000 mile OCIs. Doesn't matter as I can fix the engines and transmissions likely better than people can pay top buck for.

I'm not nearly the smartest guy out there, so why do so many of you feel you can't live without the chemical hit? You may as well be injecting it like Trump's bleach (please don't) because that is basically what you are already doing, I assure you the cars generally won't care less.

Reality check...........you do it because you DON'T KNOW HOW to fix the cars and/or you are lazy. I don't want to say you are stupid, because you are NOT and everybody has his place on this earth for some reason. But you need to brush up on the skills and quit feeding at the trough of endless loss that NEVER pays back. Those chemical reps know it and the parts store people know it, they constantly make fun of the 'dumb-ss customers looking for fix in a bottle'. One of the reasons why I quit, the endless over and over throwing away of money hard worked for in the mistaken belief something was going to be fixed by it. Then the result comes in and 'the car runs better than it ever has before' and 'gas mileage improved by 100%' and you go outside and the guy's car is missing as bad as it ever was if not worse and you know again for the 90,000th time you are looking at a pure loser. I got SICK of it.

There's certainly no law that says you have to do the best for yourself you can....beware. Entire lines of profit are based on you NOT.
 

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My 2012 Focus has 123,000 kms (approx.).

Is there any noticeable benefit to get some valve intake cleaner?
I seriously doubt you'd see a noticeable benefit with just a spray cleaner, and it's likely not needed. Mine runs like new at 135K+ and you can find a number of DI Focus' at this forum and others with much higher miles.
 

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I've seen some carbon buildup on intakes that took a super powerful bench grinder with wirewheel brush that would eat wood take a tremendous amount of pressure to remove those deposits. They resisted even a hammer and chisel.

I do not know if DI deposits get that hard but if they do I could see no solvent touching them unless you had like the valves free of head to soak them for like a week.
 

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Vacuum measurement, for those who prefer facts over misinformation:

fluidpowerjournal.com/vacuum-measurement-a-basic-guide/
 
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