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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2012 Focus has 123,000 kms (approx.).

Is there any noticeable benefit to get some valve intake cleaner?
 

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2012 Focus SE hatchback black
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If it's a direct injection engine which all North American Focuses are then it's a good idea to remove the deposits that tend to accumulate on this modern type of fuel injection. You don't have the gasoline mixture flowing over the valves like a conventional fuel injected engine does so carbon and gunk deposits will tend to accumulate on the valves. CRC makes a quality product.
 

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Which vacuum line is best to use when spraying in the CRC cleaner? I’ve heard some will spray just before the throttle body but I’d like a more direct path. I’ve heard some say just to pull the brake booster line and spray within that. I just feel there’s a better more direct path than those two routes but don’t know enough about the vacuum/pcv system to locate the best line. Any help would be appreciated as I’ll be doing this in the next 500 miles.
 

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Check a couple of these threads they might help you




-Matt
 

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Which vacuum line is best to use when spraying in the CRC cleaner? I’ve heard some will spray just before the throttle body but I’d like a more direct path. I’ve heard some say just to pull the brake booster line and spray within that. I just feel there’s a better more direct path than those two routes but don’t know enough about the vacuum/pcv system to locate the best line. Any help would be appreciated as I’ll be doing this in the next 500 miles.
It doesn't really matter which vacuum line that you use as all of them will suck back into the intake. Just make sure that there's no device/valve/part between the line and the intake. If the booster line is accessible then use that. If not, then simply choose another as there really is no "best" line to use. I mean if it were me then I'd choose a bigger line than a smaller one so that it might atomize/mix the cleaner a bit with the air and use a rag or something to keep it from leaking out. However, it will make little if any difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm a super n00b when it comes to cars, do you have a picture of a good vacuum line to use?

Thank you in advance.
 

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do you have a picture of a good vacuum line to use
It depends on your car and where the vacuum lines meet the intake manifold. Find a line that feeds all cylinders evenly, if possible. With plain air, that doesn't matter. But when you add liquid or spray to the mix, it's heavier than air and won't self distribute as easily.

Many people use the brake booster line, but that's a bad location on my intake manifold.
 

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Wrong. Bigger line means less pressure, not more.
Lol, excuse me? You haven't a clue dude. YOU'RE WRONG.
Who said anything about pressure in the first place except you?
We're dealing with negative pressure(vacuum) and hose size matters not. It will be the same vacuum unless something else in the line is changing the amount of vacuum being pulled. If you put a vacuum gauge on the larger line it will read the same as the smaller line if coming from the same place or tee.
 

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I'm a super n00b when it comes to cars, do you have a picture of a good vacuum line to use?

Thank you in advance.
The benefit with a bigger line like the booster line is that it will pull some air in along with the cleaner compared to a small line which will be pulling in almost all cleaner. It will help to distribute the cleaner in the intake more evenly. Most brake boosters are buried under the cowls these days therefore anything after the MAF will be ok to spray into and preferably into the throttle body. Spraying on the MAF would NOT be ok.
If you look at the top of the pic in the center right you will see a blue rectangular push button quick disconnect. Remove this hose and spray into there with the engine running as per the CRC instructions. The MAF is all the way on the right where the hose clamp is. It has the little red part on the harness end.
Resized_20210503_041709.jpg
 

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You haven't a clue dude
Wrong again.

A given vacuum applied to a larger surface area creates more force. Pressure is measured in PSI, pounds per square inch. The more square inches of surface area with a given vacuum, the more total force. That's why the brake booster line is bigger, to apply more force to that component.

But when you disconnect the vacuum line, the vacuum is broken, and air flows through the line. Bigger line, less PSI, and less help atomizing any liquid.

This is why Seafoam stopped recommending liquid in vacuum lines. Because many mechanics are not smart enough to think things through.
 

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Wrong again.

A given vacuum applied to a larger surface area creates more force. Pressure is measured in PSI, pounds per square inch. The more square inches of surface area with a given vacuum, the more total force. That's why the brake booster line is bigger, to apply more force to that component.

But when you disconnect the vacuum line, the vacuum is broken, and air flows through the line. Bigger line, less PSI, and less help atomizing any liquid.

This is why Seafoam stopped recommending liquid in vacuum lines. Because many mechanics are not smart enough to think things through.
Nope, you are talking about force of vacuum on a surface. I'm talking about an open vacuum line to the atmosphere at least in the case of my bigger line anyway. If you put a tube squirting fluid into a vacuum line that takes up the same size as the vacuum line or almost the same size then you will suck in almost no air if any air at all. Thus, no atomization occurs thru that line because it's completely liquid.
If you put that same tube in a vacuum line of a larger size then it will suck in plenty of air with the cleaner and mix with that air as it travels thru that line to the intake. Thru the smaller line is all cleaner or nearly all cleaner. Thru the bigger line is air and the cleaner.
Smaller line, less air able to enter if at all. Bigger line, lots of air can enter.
CRC instructs squirting it into the TB, vacuum line, or past the MAF in their video.
I can see that you can't conceptualize this concept so what was that last sentence of yours?
 

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same size as the vacuum line or almost the same size
Big difference between "same size" which allows no extra air flow vs "almost." The "almost" creates more intake air pressure. A big fat line provides little to none.

And that only matters for liquid, not spray. The spray is pre atomized by the carbon dioxide in the can. Look at the MSDS for carbon dioxide.

I can see that you can't conceptualize this concept
You're a genius in your own mind.
 

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Big difference between "same size" which allows no extra air flow vs "almost." The "almost" creates more intake air pressure. A big fat line provides little to none.

And that only matters for liquid, not spray. The spray is pre atomized by the carbon dioxide in the can. Look at the MSDS for carbon dioxide.



You're a genius in your own mind.
It's not a big difference between same or almost. The little line is flooded with cleaner which btw is squirting at pressure. The larger line still has plenty of suction to pull in BOTH air and cleaner. "Provides little to none" is not only an exaggeration but a complete fabrication. A brake booster line has plenty regardless of what you say and if it provided none then it would be useless for making the booster operate. You like to try to twist things in your favor but it just isn't working.
There's still way more liquid to air ratio thru the little line vs the bigger line regardless of the CO2 which is the same thru either line.
Unfortunately, I'm not at the genius level but it's evident that you definitely aren't either. Also, you're the one who brought up the words not smart enough to think in that last sentence. I just turned them on you as they applied more appropriately.
 

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You quite frankly need again for the 40th time to shut up. You have confused positive and negative pressure left and right as well as the idea of vacuum working on a surface vs. working a void. You once again show you have not a clue but you seem to insist on that about once a week.

Such as.....

'But when you disconnect the vacuum line, the vacuum is broken, and air flows through the line. Bigger line, less PSI, and less help atomizing any liquid.'

A bigger line in a vacuum leak situation has the pressure go UP as positive pressure overrides the negative more, it is strengthened by the bigger leak. The increased rush of positive pressure matter does the atomizing.

Seafoam quit telling people to use vacuum lines for liquids as too many people were messing up engines because they poured into lines too small to send a solid jet of liquid into the motors to do damage. It is a liability issue.
 
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