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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is for the EAP Recaro seats but I can't imagine regular SVT seats are any different. I have this same write up in .doc format if someone can host it. I show how to take the seat apart, but I haven't put mine back together yet because my heater pad is actually burned up so I need to get another one before I put it all back. Let me know if you have questions! I can't get the pictures up right now either, internet is really slow today because we have a snowstorm so everyone is on it right now.

Focus Heated Seat Repair
W/ EAP Recaro Seats

Tools needed:
Socket set-7mm socket, 10mm socket, extension, and wrench
T47 socket for seat bolts
Needle nose and regular pliers
Flathead screwdriver (a long one)
Multimeter or test light
Flashlight
Gloves

DISCLAIMER: I am not a pro, and neither are you. If you break something, or my instructions aren’t perfect, sorry! Take your time, and if you get in over your head stop before you ruin your fancy seats!

1) First things first, figure out if the switch is the problem or the seat is the problem. I did this by using the 7mm socket with an extension and removing the wiring harness from the seat. It is under the front right side of the seat.

2) Using your test light or meter, probe between pin #6 of the harness (green w/ red stripe) and ground (I used the seat bolt nearest to the harness) and press the heated seat button. You should see 12 volts on this wire. If you do the switch is good. Press and release the switch a few times just to make sure it isn’t an intermittent failure in the switch. If you keep seeing 12 volts…..lucky you! You get to take the seat apart!


3) To remove the seat, remove the plastic trim cover over the front left bolt. Just wiggle is back and forth and it will come off. Using the T47 socket and extension, remove the bolt. Then remove the other side front bolt. Once those two are out, slide the seat forward using the adjustment handle. The rear left bolt is covered by a trim piece, pry it away from the carpet, it kind of “sticks” to the carpet. Remove both rear bolts.

4) Lean the top of the seat out of the driver’s door, and tip the seat so the bottom follows. Be careful not to hit the seat frame on the door or you might scratch something.

5) Once you get the seat to where you are going to be working on it, tip it on its side so you can see the bottom. On the bottom cushion there are some plastic clips that hold random wires. Gently separate the clips and remove the wires.



6) There are 4 10mm bolts that hold the bottom cushion to the frame, remove them. They are gold colored and really obvious but when I took this picture I had already removed most of mine.


Separate the bottom of the cushion from the frame, but be careful not to snag any of the wires or to pull the heated seat wire too hard.


7) Once the cushion is clear, use the needle nose pliers to remove the hog rings holding the back of the seat cover on. Do this carefully if you are going to re-use them.


8) Once the hog rings are all removed (total of 7 of them) use the regular pliers or screwdriver to bend the tabs that are holding the front of the seat cover on.

These are pretty tough to bend, and you might want to wear gloves


9) Gently work the back of the seat cover off until you can see where the retaining clips in the seat foam are. These clips are in the grooves of the foam, and run along both sides of the seat and in the two groves that run across the lower cushion. They are a bit of a pain, but BE CAREFUL not to rip them out of the foam or when you put the seat cover back on it will look crappy.




What did was remove the clips on both sides first using the screwdriver, leaving the ones in the middle connected. These are a huge pain, but take your time and you will get them. Once the sides were done, you can GENTLY slide the seat cover to one side and you will remove the black plastic strip from the red clips. This will be more obvious once you are looking at them. If you look at the last picture where the heater pad is off the seat cushion you can see the location of all the red clips.

10) Once you have the seat cover off you can see the heating pad.

Note the nice burn hole in mine. I am not one of the lucky ones who had a wire break off the thermostat.


11) The heating pad is easily removed, there are adhesive strips on each end of it holding it to the foam seat bottom. Once the pad is off you can see the thermostat and where the wiring harness connects to the heater pad.



If you have broken wires here, solder them back together. Be sure to put some heat shrink tubing over the solder join, and make sure to extend the heat shrink an inch or two past your repair to add some strength to the connection.

I am basically done at this point because I need to order another heater pad since mine is burned up. I’ll take more pictures when I put it back together, but the re-assembly looks to be very straight forward. I would put the seat cover on starting at the front because it is so stiff that it will be tough to hold the cover over the retainer clips. I will try to update this how to once I put mine all back together.

**UPDATE: Finally got my new seat pad from Mike at Hillbish Ford. Good price too!**

So the re-assembly begins:

When I removed my old pad I just cut the wires, not really knowing what the new one would come with. It actually comes pre-assembled with a new wiring harness and everything. So you need to remove the old one from the connector at the front of the seat.

Cut this zip tie, and you can see the little clip that hold the connector to the seat. There is a tab that will release it. You release the tab the whole connector slides toward the front of the seat and will disconnect and hang loose.



The green connector is the one we are trying to remove. There is a little spot of glue over the small "clip" that holds the green connector into the main connector. You need to chip this glue off until you can see the black "latch". Using a small screwdriver, release the latch, and pull the green connector toward you (toward the back of the main connector, it slides out the back). This will be a pain but you'll get it eventually.

Once that is done, lay the heated seat pad onto the seat foam and make sure that you work the non-heated sections of the pad into the grooves in the seat foam. You have to be sure that all the wrinkles are out of the pad otherwise the seat will be lumpy. Be sure all the red clips are showing through their appropriate holes in the heating pad. Also make sure that the wiring harness and the thermostat are fed through the hole in the seat cushion. The T-Stat lives in the hole so make sure it's in there or you will have a lump.



When you have the pad all set and it's as flat as you can get it, remove the tape covering the adhesive strips on each end of the heater pad. Stick them down in the same places they were when the original pad was on. Make sure you press firmly with your fingertips to be sure that the tape is stuck down correctly.



Now.....let the games begin! Replacing the leather cover really isn't all that bad but you need to make sure that all of the black plastic strips make it into the appropriate red clips in the seat foam or you will have issues. It's fairly easy to see what goes where once you have the cover sitting on the seat foam. I made two critical mistakes at this point. The first time I tried to put the cover back on, I did the outside edges first then tried to get the seat cover to snap into the red clips. THIS WILL NOT WORK. Also, while I was pressing down very hard trying to get the clips in place, I forgot about the green connector (which was under the seat cushion frame) until I heard a crack. I managed to break muy new heater pad's connector DOH. It still works, but something to look out for.

Once you have all the clips in place it should look something like this:



You shouldn't have any weird lumps or anything. If you do you missed a clip. If you don't fix it now it will bug you later so do it right. Now you can work on getting the edges of the cover back onto their respective mounting clips. It's tough but if you get everything in the right place, the seat will look like you never took it apart. All that's left is to route the heater pad wiring harness the same way as the old one and insert it into the seat's main connector. Re-mount the connector as it was before and re-zip time the bundle of wires if you have one handy. Put the lower cushion back into the seat frame and tighten down the four bolts. Make sure all the wires are replaced into the plastic clips and mount the seat back into the car!

Enjoy the new warmth!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I tried to upload the photos again but stupid Photobucket still isn't working (for me at least). I got them to Picasa, but apparently you can't use that to host, I edited the post with links to the picture and they don't display. I'll try again tomorrow.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry it took so long, I don't know why I couldn't get to Photobucket but it finally worked last night. I'll try to get some more pics when I get the new heater pad.
 

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First of all, thanks for a great guide on how to fix this annoying but expensive fault !

Those burns look nasty ! Which part has overheated, the heating cable itself, or the connection point between heating cable and supply wire ?

Do you know if it is possible to attach the seat cover temporarily if there is a need for spare parts of any kind during the process ? Or will there be a high risk of braking off clips, etc ?
 

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Thanks

I would just like to thank you for taking the time to post the pictures and such detailed instructions. It certainly will make mthis task much easier which I am about to start tomorrow. I note you say there are strips of adhesive holding the element to the seat cushion. mine seems to glued with a black tar like substance

Anyone have a clue as to the cost of a new element? I just got a quote of $500.00 to have the job done at the local dealer ship Sounds awfully high to me and much more than I can afford at the moment. Thats what prompted me to search the forums

Again thanks for the great posting
James
 

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^^^Get a hold of Mike Trendel (b16sir1991 on FF) at Hilbish Motors.
He is a vendor on this site, and has his own forums:
http://www.focusfanatics.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=94
NOTE!
Calling him will get much quicker results than posting a thread or sending him a PM.

Oh...
[welcome] to FocusFanatics!
 

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can we see a picture of the finished job. also how difficult was it to complete this job. just wanna know, before i go messing around with these nice seats. [unsure]
 

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This is a project I to have to do now. Damn cold winters and making me run the seats 24/7!! Thank for the great DIY instructions, will make it ooo sooo much easier now!
 

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It wasn't that bad of a job. Just fixed my heat pad on Friday. Took about 1 1/2 - 2hrs. The biggest pain was the hog pins(i think that's what they're called) The SVT non recaro seats are slightly different than the recarro seats. Towards the end of the how to post there are no red clips on the non recarro seats (red/black, blue/black) Just those hog pin things. The pad is also slightly different too. The one I got didn't have any adhesive strips. I just used a littl glue on the corners. The Two things I would suggest is to get the tool for those hog rings, and to not take the cover completely off the seat. Just the two center hog pins and then slide the pad out and the new pad in. (advice for non recarro seat) Other wise the write up was spot on. Easy job to do!
 

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stupid question....
Is the heating pad the heating element everyone is talking about?
 
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