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Greased the two stock sway bar bushings that are on top of the cross member last night. I was having a squeak if I didn't roll both tires over an obstacle at the same time (backing out of driveway, speed bump, etc).

It can be done, took me about 90 minutes start to finish and sucked ass the whole way. Two 13mm bolts on each side.

Passenger side isnt bad, a ratchet and a 2" extension will get this side done.

Driver side you want a ratcheting wrench (harborfreight worked fine) for the one closest to rear of car.
The one to the front you can use a ratchet with a wobble or joint and a short 13mm. This one was the ONLY bolt I did not remove all the way because it was so slow to work, I loosened it up enough to get the bushing slid over.

They are not torqued to much, probably 15-30ft lbs max (my mustang was 18ft lbs rear, 35 front) but you can't wrench them anyway.

Drove it today and no squeak. [strongman] [thankyou]

Now to fix my damn highway steering shake... :/
 

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Okay, for anyone with the stock, OEM, rubber swaybar bushings; rubber bushings wear out but you don't really notice the performance loss over time, just the eventual knocking over sharp-edged bumps that tells you they are dry-rotted (check your end links for play as well;). The rears are easily accessible, but the front swaybar mounts are somewhat difficult to access, so you really only want to do this once and then forget about it. That means to buy quality, urethane upgrade/ replacement bushings that come with application-specific grease included. I recommend Prothane (street stiffness) swaybar bushings as they are engineered to hold the grease inside the bushing, perform better than OEM, and will retain their level of performance longer due to better engineering/manufacturing process, which allows for grease to be captured and retained inside the bushing.

Know and order the correct size bushings for your car model, as they differ between year and model variants!!! Also, be sure to pay attention to how the old bushings faced/positioned when you take them off and thoroughly grease up the new bushings with nitrile gloves on to coat the interior before you get under the car to install them...the included grease is very tacky and will make a hell of a mess if you get it on you, or your tools. It's a lot easier/cleaner job if you don't try to grease them last minute under the car. Overall this is not a difficult job, but it does take time for the uninitiated due to the difficult access to the four retaining bolts, and why would anybody want to have to do this again six months down the road or less; just buy the Prothane bushings and remain noise-free for the long haul.
 

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YOU CAN DO THIS!!!
I too was concerned after reading internet forum posts about swapping the front swaybar bushings, where most commenters stated they had to loosen the subframe to drop it down for access to the swaybar bolts. After eyeballing it from under the car ('03 SVT) up on jack stands, I decided to go in from the top as posters had suggested, which is definitely the way to go on this to break bolts loose. I removed the airbox for better access to the driver's side bolts, which are right under the fuse box basically, but you might reach them w/o the airbox removed with someone under the car helping you to locate the bolts/hold the socket on them...etc. Just be patient as the bolts are long and there is very little room to work in; you want a 13mm ratcheting wrench (i.e. Gearwrench type) with a lot of teeth so it will work in confined spaces w/o repositioning. From the top, you will need several feet of extensions and a swivel connector at the end with a 13mm socket, and using a cheater bar or a long torque wrench is ideal to break the bolts loose before switching to a shorter driver for bolt removal. The bolts are tight! When putting back together I hand-assembled bushing carriers/bolts and started threads on BOTH sides of swaybar before tightening anything down. I was able to tighten all four from underneath the car using a 13mm ratcheting wrench with a fine movement and applied a final torque by linking a longer box-end wrench to end of the ratcheting wrench to create an expedient torque wrench in the limited space available (ancient mechanics secret...shhhhhh;). It sounds impossible, but it works crazy good so long as you keep the wrenches aligned with each other when applying pressure. If you don't you'll end up bloody and bruised at the very least. Cheers!
 
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