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These came directly from fords owners website if you have more tips add them here i know many of you have been experiencing lower MPG's maybe there is something here that could help one could be the winter one using your heater decreases MPG alot take a look [neener]

How To Save FuelAs fuel costs fluctuate and concerns about the environment increase, many drivers are wondering what they can do to conserve fuel. To help you address these concerns, we've assembled a list of the top Eco-Driving Tips.

We call it Eco-Driving because these habits have both economical and ecological benefits.
Drive to maximize your fuel economy

Don’t drive aggressively (up to 33%)
Simply put, aggressive driving wastes gas. This includes tactics such as jackrabbit starts (rapidly accelerating from a stop), stopping short (braking hard at the last possible second) and weaving (constantly changing lanes to get around other cars). At highway speeds, this behavior can be costly, reducing your fuel economy by as much as 33%. It can also contribute to premature wear on your brakes and tires.

Slow down (up to 25%)
Another form of aggressive driving – speeding – can be a big fuel waster. Gas mileage usually decreases rapidly at speeds above 60 mph. Reducing your speed from 65 to 55 mph can improve your fuel economy by 10% to 15% and reducing your speed from 70 to 55 mph can improve your fuel economy by a whopping 25%. So what’s your hurry?

Use cruise control
This helps you save fuel in two ways. First, it controls your maximum speed, which can help you stay below 60 mph. Second, it maintains a constant speed, which means you won’t be pumping extra fuel into your engine to accelerate. Many modern vehicles will let you monitor your mpg while you’re driving. You should aim to set your cruise control at your vehicle’s most fuel-efficient speed, as long as it’s at or below the legal limit.

Remove excess weight (up to 4% per 100 lbs)
Avoid keeping unnecessary items in your vehicle, especially heavy ones. An extra 100 pounds in your trunk or back seat could reduce your miles per gallon by up to 4%. So think about whether or not you really want your toolbox, golf clubs and bowling ball with you wherever you go.

Reduce your drag
Your vehicle is designed with efficient aerodynamics in mind. Even with that, 50% of the energy required to operate most vehicles is spent overcoming wind resistance. Cartop carriers, rooftop bike racks and even those plastic window flags for your favorite sports team can all add resistance and cut down your fuel efficiency, especially at high speeds. Washing and waxing your vehicle can actually help your aerodynamics too.

Save A/C for the highway (up to 15%)
Your air conditioning makes your engine work harder, which can equate to as much as a 10% to 15% reduction in fuel efficiency when outdoor temperatures climb above 80° Fahrenheit. For city driving or in heavy traffic, turn your air conditioning off and roll down the windows if you can stand the heat. At speeds of 50 mph or more, however, the drag created by your open windows will actually cost you more in fuel economy than the A/C. So feel free to roll your windows up and use the air on the highway if you need to.

Combine trips
Your engine works most efficiently when it’s warmed up. Making lots of sporadic short trips means more cumulative driving with a cold engine. When you have to drive for errands, get as many accomplished as you can in one trip – that way, you’ll be optimizing your fuel economy.

Avoid excessive idling
This one’s a no-brainer. An engine that’s not running uses no fuel, while idling gets zero mpg. If you know you’ll stop for a while (such as when picking up a friend who isn’t ready yet or waiting for a passenger to run into the store), it’s always better to turn off your engine. (Never turn off your engine while waiting at traffic lights, though.) Vehicles with larger engines typically waste more gas at idle than ones with smaller engines, so this is even more important to keep in mind if you drive a truck.
Save fuel with proper vehicle maintenance

Use the right oil (up to 2%)
You can improve your gas mileage by up to 2% by using the manufacturer's recommended grade of motor oil. Your recommended grade can be found in your Owner Guide, but it can vary depending on your driving conditions. Our experts have a full line of Motorcraft® oil and filter products on hand and will use the correct grade for your vehicle every time you come in for an oil change.

Keep your tires properly inflated (up to 4%)
Underinflated tires are less safe, wear out faster and waste fuel, causing drivers to lose as many as 2 million gallons of gas per day. Keeping your tires inflated to the proper level can help improve your gas mileage by around 3% to 4%. The operating vehicle tire inflation pressure that Ford Motor Company certifies and recommends for normal use is found on a Certification Decal or Tire Decal, usually located on the driver’s door or door pillar, or the glove box. (Tire pressure information does NOT appear in the Owner Guide, as the government requires it to be permanently affixed to the vehicle.) Make sure not to exceed that number, though, because overinflated tires can be just as bad.

Keep your engine tuned (up to 40%)
Fixing a car that is noticeably out of tune or has failed an emissions test can improve gas mileage by an average of 4%. But here’s the real bonus – if our experts find a malfunctioning oxygen sensor, replacing it can improve your mileage by as much as 40%.

Don’t forget the little things (up to 25%)
There’s no better thing you can do for your vehicle than getting regular maintenance at your local Ford or Lincoln Dealership. We’ve already mentioned changing your oil and keeping your tires properly inflated. Wheel alignments, shock and strut inspections, and replacing worn fuel filters or spark plugs can all help optimize your fuel economy too. Together, all these vehicle maintenance operations can improve your mileage by up to 25%. If you haven’t been following your maintenance schedule, coming in for the Works Fuel Saver Package is a great way to start.

Schedule an appointment
Things to keep in mind when you fill up

Tighten the cap
Your gas tank needs both fuel and fumes for your engine to work most efficiently, so if your vehicle has a gas cap, make sure to tighten it all the way after every fill-up. Many modern cars are actually designed to turn on the "check engine" light if they detect a bad seal at the gas cap.

Fill up in the dark
Fueling generates fewer vapors when it’s cool and dark outside, so fill up in the early morning or late evening. While the difference in your monetary savings is very small, the less vapor in the atmosphere, the better it is for the environment.

Use the correct octane
The engineers who built your engine designed it to work most efficiently with a certain octane-rated fuel, which you can find in your Owner Guide. Anything below this will adversely affect your fuel economy. And anything above it will just cost you more money with no real benefit.

Sources: fueleconomy.gov, ftc.gov, epa.gov, drivingskillsforlife.com.
 

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Don’t drive aggressively (up to 33%)
Slow down (up to 25%)
Remove excess weight (up to 4% per 100 lbs)
Save A/C for the highway (up to 15%)
Use the right oil (up to 2%)
Keep your tires properly inflated (up to 4%)
Keep your engine tuned (up to 40%)
Don’t forget the little things (up to 25%)

Total of 147% savings...
Wow, is the gas station going to pay me once a week to stop in and say hello?

J/K
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Total of 147% savings...
Wow, is the gas station going to pay me once a week to stop in and say hello?

J/K
this is a copy and paste job they must be considering an improvement if u failed to do all these or was driving wastefully my best guest lolz.
 

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In driving my Focus, the biggest gas waster is stoplights.
Having to stop for no other reason than traffic lights or stop signs is the #1 waste of gas.

Driving at a steady moderate (32mph up to 53mph in top gear) speed for long distances on flat roads produces the best mpg figures.
 

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In driving my Focus, the biggest gas waster is stoplights.
Having to stop for no other reason than traffic lights or stop signs is the #1 waste of gas.

Driving at a steady moderate (32mph up to 53mph in top gear) speed for long distances on flat roads produces the best mpg figures.
Same here. Nothing pisses me off more than driving 50 highway miles, then getting off the highway and seeing my gauge drop 5mpg because of 5 lights/stop signs.
 

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Same here. Nothing pisses me off more than driving 50 highway miles, then getting off the highway and seeing my gauge drop 5mpg because of 5 lights/stop signs.
The 2012 Focus can be flat towed so I've begun switching it into neutral below 35mph up to lights and turning the ignition off. (yes it will start and go into gear while rolling just in case the light changes on you- the dual clutch manumatic will allow it). I'm seeing a 2mpg improvement by not idling so far on this tank..

I'm currently testing this for the first tank and I'm getting above 39mpg so far... (that's city and highway 50/50). I've been slipping it into neutral and keeping the engine on for 5 or so tanks and seen a 4mpg increase for that move alone. (So this will net me 6mpg overall bringing me to +39mpg city/highway combined). -basically slipping the car into Neutral when coming up to a low speed turn, stop, stoplight etc (when under 35mph). Now turning the ignition off at long stoplights, trains, fastfood windows, etc... (should net me more mpgs)...
[headbang]

(strange thing is if I stomp on it every once and a while I actually see an increase in FE).
 

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The 2012 Focus can be flat towed so I've begun switching it into neutral below 35mph up to lights and turning the ignition off. (yes it will start and go into gear while rolling just in case the light changes on you- the dual clutch manumatic will allow it). I'm seeing a 2mpg improvement by not idling so far on this tank..

I'm currently testing this for the first tank and I'm getting above 39mpg so far... (that's city and highway 50/50). I've been slipping it into neutral and keeping the engine on for 5 or so tanks and seen a 4mpg increase for that move alone. (So this will net me 6mpg overall bringing me to +39mpg city/highway combined). -basically slipping the car into Neutral when coming up to a low speed turn, stop, stoplight etc (when under 35mph). Now turning the ignition off at long stoplights, trains, fastfood windows, etc... (should net me more mpgs)...
[headbang]

(strange thing is if I stomp on it every once and a while I actually see an increase in FE).
Well, with the push-start Titanium, you have to have your foot on the break for the engine to start, so this won't work for me :-(

However, the car does have engine braking, which saves fuel while coming to a stop. And I agree - driving like a madman up to 35mpg seems to get better gas mileage than doing it slower.
 

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Well, with the push-start Titanium, you have to have your foot on the break for the engine to start, so this won't work for me :-(

However, the car does have engine braking, which saves fuel while coming to a stop. And I agree - driving like a madman up to 35mpg seems to get better gas mileage than doing it slower.
True, not every Focus is created equal... lol. I've seen that a typical 80% WOT push nets more mpgs than a 30% semi granny push. But a slow and steady, very annoyingly steady 1700 rpms-ish, acceleration nets the most Mpgs.. It's minimal compared to the 80%WOT push, so I just say get it and forget it. It will save your sanity (and your rear bumper).

PratoN- you can still slip it into neutral below 35mph and kill the engine at long lights/ trains, etc.. I just wouldn't do it in your case until you're truly stopped. Seeing how this technique will undoubtedly cause more starter wear, I'm not sure the mpg savings is worth it anyways. I'm doing it for a tank then I'll figure out if I want to continue. But, I'll most likely still kill the engine at long lights, trains and fast food windows. I'll probably not be killing the engine while rolling in reality unless it's a big mpg improvement (I'd feel safer with a standard because at lest I could bump start the engine instead of using the starter).

This Focus is like a big video game to me and I'm just playing with my car trying to get the high score.

[race]
 

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When Im coming to a stop or i can see traffic ahead I just put it in neutral and as far as going 15mph under the speedlimit on the highway thats a joke sorry but Im not slowing down just to see 40+ mpg. I think 34 at 80 is plenty enough.
 

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I have a few friends that are engineers at Ford. One of them is a mechanical engineer working on engines.

I spoke to him at length about Ford's aggressive deceleration fuel shutoff feature. This feature is a perfect complement to the hypermiling technique of "driving without breaks".

The fuel shutoff feature uses more than half-a-dozen variables to calculate when to shutoff the fuel going into the engine. The main three are: throttle position/ brakes applied, engine RPM, and load (A/C, defrost, read window defrost, all other electric current draw: lights, radio). The other variables are items such as engine temp, vehicle speed.

For example, when coasting down from any high-way speed (foot off the gas pedal), or even city road speeds, the engine computer will shut off the gas to the fuel injectors. When the vehicle nears stopping speed (say at a traffic light) the computer then will turn back on fuel to the engine to maintain a minimum of 600 RPM (the standard idle speed). So do not use the Advanced hypermiling techniques of turning off the engine when coasting down a long hill, or even putting the transmission in neutral to coast. The engine computer shuts off fuel (and turns it back on) faster, safer and more efficiently, than any human could.

The other feature we talked about was the variable valve timing for the two cam shafts. This is not a switch that has two settings: economy or performance. The engine computer can adjust the timing of both the intake and exhaust valves (independently) to provide a (relatively) infinite range of timings as necessary to respond to throttle position. This provides both economy and performance from the same engine. There is no need to use a high octane fuel to attempt modify valve timing for better gas mileage, with the Twin independent variable camshaft timing (Ti-VCT), the engine computer determines the best valve timing. I asked how I could know if the computer was using maximum economy timing, he said there was no way for me to know, he recommended I use the eco-mode in the display.

The other hypermiling item I noticed is that the Tires: Continental contiprocontact, have a maximum 51 psi. I would guess that filling the tires that full would lower the rolling resistance significantly. (I personally would not fill the tires that high during winter/snow season.)

The Focus Super Fuel Economy package uses four items to achieve the extra 2 miles per gallon (highway only):
  1. low rolling resistance tires,
  2. active grill shutter,
  3. rear spoiler,
  4. and aerodynamic wheel covers.
From what I have read, the low rolling resistance tires probably make up 75% of the 2 MPG improvement.

Ford's press release on the gas saving technologies for the Focus:
http://media.ford.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=33942
 

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I tend to anticipate stops (traffic, stop signs, red lights, right and left turns) and put the car in neutral just so I don't have to hold my foot on the clutch. Pretty lazy but I've been doing it for about 35 years now.

I've done it so long that I'm really good at getting it in neutral as soon as possible for the longest possible coast. I usually don't use the clutch, just give a little gas (then let off) to take the pressure off the tranny and pop it out.

Sounds like I might be defeating some of Fords computer econo wizardry. Not gonna change now. Too late.

Of course with an Automatic I just set it and forget it. Lazy rearing it's ugly head again.
 

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In driving my Focus, the biggest gas waster is stoplights.
Having to stop for no other reason than traffic lights or stop signs is the #1 waste of gas.

Driving at a steady moderate (32mph up to 53mph in top gear) speed for long distances on flat roads produces the best mpg figures.
You spend a lot more on motels and food as you leisurely wend your way across country, than you would no gas at 70.[unsure]
 

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I just wouldn't do it in your case until you're truly stopped. Seeing how this technique will undoubtedly cause more starter wear, I'm not sure the mpg savings is worth it anyways.

[race]
Don't forget battery replacement! You will probably kill the battery long before you kill the starter.
 

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You spend a lot more on motels and food as you leisurely wend your way across country, than you would no gas at 70.[unsure]
I have a mesh cooler I use for bringing lunch to work that I leave in the passenger side floor well. I'll keep sandwiches and 1/2 frozen water bottles in that on really long drives.

Keeping a box of granola bars or what not in the car helps too.
 

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I have a mesh cooler I use for bringing lunch to work that I leave in the passenger side floor well. I'll keep sandwiches and 1/2 frozen water bottles in that on really long drives.

Keeping a box of granola bars or what not in the car helps too.
I used to do the same in my old Mazda 3 (business loaner car) used to drive 2-3 hours or 4 a day depending on traffic four hours was rare but yeah hated that so much i brought my own little cooler and left it there and some sandwiches. i covered the sandwiches in aluminum foil and put it on the dash to get heat up by the sun Hmm remember the old days warm cheese lolz.[headbang]
 

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On my commute I try to get behind a medium sized truck. Even at a normal follow distance I save gas. SUVs work too but trucks are better. My focus stops better than any truck out there.
 

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On my commute I try to get behind a medium sized truck. Even at a normal follow distance I save gas. SUVs work too but trucks are better. My focus stops better than any truck out there.
i forgot about doing that not only does it saves gas but i use it to pass people a good driving technique that you can use in the track and on the street. you can tell the difference in the tug in pull if u are or not behind a truck. another good one is traveling in the evening times i like to drive around that time period to avoid traffic and get gas into my car without losing it via vapor or something. but yeah
 
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