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I had a 14 Titanium.

First clutch pack at about 15K, second at 40K then at about 50 it started shuddering again. None of the clutches made it past 5K miles before I started noticing the shuddering but delayed taking it in just because of the annoyance. I was getting closer to the end of the warranty so I took it back again. At that point I traded it for a 16 Titanium thinking that maybe they corrected the issue. I've loved driving the Focus with the exception of the DCT. At around 10K I started noticing it but it wasn't severe. At around 15K I had let Tom do a tune on my car at the same time changing the thermostat to 180 on his advice. To be fair I hadnt said anything to Tom about the shuddering because the DCT issue is so common. The Tune was fantastic, loved it and would do it again in a second but the shuddering continued to get worse. So at 20K I took it to Ford again. My dealership was always fantastic about getting the clutch replaced quickly, no questions or hassles they just fixed it quickly. Anyhow during all the clutch issues I noticed that if the car was cold I generally didnt have problems, after a replacement when it got into the summer months then the clutch would start down hill. Now after the last clutch replacement Ive gone through most of the summer with no issues and an additional 20K on the clutch. The DCT feels like its a good thing to have in the car. So I cant help but think having the engine with the 180 thermostat may have been helpful. Less heat soak into the transmission and clutch. I dont think changing the thermostat to 180 after the clutch has been over heated helps the DCT but having the lower temp thermostat then having a new clutch might be the key. That or the last clutch pack and firmware actually worked?

Has anyone else had this experience after changing to the 180 thermostat?
This is interesting. I put 31k on my clutches before I bought Tom's tune and it drives way better with the tune, but it's not perfect. The clutches are being replaced on the 12th under the extension. I want to see how it will do with new clutches and being tuned again by Tom.

Unfortunately it's hard to say if it was the clutch change + tune or if the thermostat made the difference. Both could definitely be of help, but I do think the software change + fresh hardware is probably most of it.

So I'm considering doing the thermostat next year. I kinda want to see what happens 15k later after new clutches and tune.

My car was almost entirely shudder free for a while on the tune, but it did start to act funny again, just not like it did stock. However I was also told my trans mounts needed replaced, and I've read that a worn mount can interfere with operation of a clutch. One thing I also started noticing was jerky shifts, especially in stop and go traffic.

Worn clutches, bad mounts...you name it. Hard to say. I'm just excited to get new hardware and retune.

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This sums it up for me. Eventually heat will win the day, regardless of using higher octane fuel, or disconnecting the negative cable to reset the adaptive learning or installing different stats or whatever else has been put forward as a fix. We had the clutches done at 55K. Smooth as silk for now but it will eventually shudder again I'm sure of it. Great looking car, but a major major screw up.
I do have a 76 Camaro, one owner, original everything including alternator and water pump . Those were the days. What happened to quality versus 'screw it let's take a gamble'.

"It was cheap to make and cheap to assemble," the engineer said, but because the DPS6 used "dry" clutch technology, it couldn't cool itself, ensuring failures in real-world use.
 

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This sums it up for me. Eventually heat will win the day, regardless of using higher octane fuel, or disconnecting the negative cable to reset the adaptive learning or installing different stats or whatever else has been put forward as a fix. We had the clutches done at 55K. Smooth as silk for now but it will eventually shudder again I'm sure of it. Great looking car, but a major major screw up.
I do have a 76 Camaro, one owner, original everything including alternator and water pump . Those were the days. What happened to quality versus 'screw it let's take a gamble'.

"It was cheap to make and cheap to assemble," the engineer said, but because the DPS6 used "dry" clutch technology, it couldn't cool itself, ensuring failures in real-world use.
See but then if the DCT in the Focus is essentially an electronically controlled manual then why is heat being blamed as the culprit? A true manual transmission has the vast majority of parts similar to the DCT and as far as I'm aware most owners of manual transmissions don't have problems.

Maybe I'm ignorant. Maybe I'm uneducated. But it seems like saying it's a heat problem is a cop out.

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Because it's hard to fully replicate a human working the clutch and accelerator. Driving a manual, you can feel very subtle queues and adjust accordingly. If the clutch acts differently as its temperature changes, you adjust for that without even thinking about it. But it is very hard to get a computer to learn that same feel and to compensate perfectly for changing conditions.
 

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See but then if the DCT in the Focus is essentially an electronically controlled manual then why is heat being blamed as the culprit? A true manual transmission has the vast majority of parts similar to the DCT and as far as I'm aware most owners of manual transmissions don't have problems.

Maybe I'm ignorant. Maybe I'm uneducated. But it seems like saying it's a heat problem is a cop out.

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Morning, you're not ignorant or uneducated. There was nation-wide news in November where even Fords production line workers admitted they all knew about the problems. Sadly owners of this focus' felt bad even owning them and tried to defend them here on these boards for years. The simple truth is the dry DCT should never have been built or sold and Ford treated thousands of honest, hard-working owners egregiously. Even the ford customer service reps who used to prowl these boards are long gone.

 

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Morning, you're not ignorant or uneducated. There was nation-wide news in November where even Fords production line workers admitted they all knew about the problems. Sadly owners of this focus' felt bad even owning them and tried to defend them here on these boards for years. The simple truth is the dry DCT should never have been built or sold and Ford treated thousands of honest, hard-working owners egregiously. Even the ford customer service reps who used to prowl these boards are long gone.

While I won't disagree that the DPS6 shouldn't have been sent to production, I still believe Ford could have done things differently with this trans. Their entire answer has been extend warranties, throw parts at them, and hope customers buy something else. Somewhere around 2014-2015 they claimed they fixed a solder crack on the TCMs. Well now I've seen people popping up online with their 2016 cars having the same problem. My point is that this is all smoke and mirrors and Ford wants to act like they've done anything substantial to remedy the problems.

They can tell me it's a physics problem with the clutches but my argument is that their shift programing on the TCM is crap and greatly exacerbates the issue. You'd think they'd do more to try to fix the problems. My impression is they've barely done anything over the years.

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Because it's hard to fully replicate a human working the clutch and accelerator. Driving a manual, you can feel very subtle queues and adjust accordingly. If the clutch acts differently as its temperature changes, you adjust for that without even thinking about it. But it is very hard to get a computer to learn that same feel and to compensate perfectly for changing conditions.
Okay, that's fair. Constant adjusting of the shifting also wouldn't be possible on a mass level without costs.

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Okay, that's fair. Constant adjusting of the shifting also wouldn't be possible on a mass level without costs.

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Other auto manufacturers have tried a dry DCT and also failed. Ford seemed to think they could make it work and I think they had something that worked under most conditions but failed in others and they sent it to production/market before they had gotten it working 100%. I'm not expert but I think that to make it work 100%, they would have to do something more radically different than what had been tried before. I have to wonder if they could have devised another type of sensor that, like a human, could detect the shudder the instant it started to happen and adjust the clutch release rate accordingly. I admit that it is a tough problem to crack because whatever they come up with, they also need to ensure that it won't lunge suddenly, resulting in a safety issue. Like I said, the adjustments a human driver would make are subtle and once you are adept, you make these adjustments unconsciously

On the other hand, the wet DCTs used by other manufacturers don't have this problem because the fluid moderates heat fluctuations so any change in friction in the clutch pack is much more of a gradual change.
 

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Other auto manufacturers have tried a dry DCT and also failed. Ford seemed to think they could make it work and I think they had something that worked under most conditions but failed in others and they sent it to production/market before they had gotten it working 100%. I'm not expert but I think that to make it work 100%, they would have to do something more radically different than what had been tried before. I have to wonder if they could have devised another type of sensor that, like a human, could detect the shudder the instant it started to happen and adjust the clutch release rate accordingly. I admit that it is a tough problem to crack because whatever they come up with, they also need to ensure that it won't lunge suddenly, resulting in a safety issue. Like I said, the adjustments a human driver would make are subtle and once you are adept, you make these adjustments unconsciously

On the other hand, the wet DCTs used by other manufacturers don't have this problem because the fluid moderates heat fluctuations so any change in friction in the clutch pack is much more of a gradual change.
Definitely think that's right. They definitely rushed it to production. The thing I wonder is if getting on the throttle then on the brake and back on the throttle is bad for the clutches. Often this is unavoidable because of traffic braking in front of you. The other thing I catch myself doing is holding in place at a certain speed or I'm waiting to turn and having a hard time judging in that split second if I should brake and stop or just wait until I can turn and go. I don't find the DCT to be trouble to operate on open roads. Of course this isn't the entire problem. Just tricky driving scenarios.

I really think every DCT should be equipped with manual mode. People call it a gimmick but being able to control when the vehicle shifts can be huge. The problem with Ford's version is there's too much of a delay between when you tell it to shift and when it actually does.

Also I'd say there's not many dry DCTs on the market. Ford's seems to be the most notorious for problems.

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While I won't disagree that the DPS6 shouldn't have been sent to production, I still believe Ford could have done things differently with this trans. Their entire answer has been extend warranties, throw parts at them, and hope customers buy something else. Somewhere around 2014-2015 they claimed they fixed a solder crack on the TCMs. Well now I've seen people popping up online with their 2016 cars having the same problem. My point is that this is all smoke and mirrors and Ford wants to act like they've done anything substantial to remedy the problems.

They can tell me it's a physics problem with the clutches but my argument is that their shift programing on the TCM is crap and greatly exacerbates the issue. You'd think they'd do more to try to fix the problems. My impression is they've barely done anything over the years.

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I'd have to agree, there's been a guy here selling "Tom's tune' and his results have been way to the positive making this transmission shift better. My overall opinion takes in similar complaints from Hyundai and Dodge Dart owners who also had dual dry clutches. Yet, for contrast, go to any major car shows and check the high end super cars, they all have WET dual clutches which work.

Totally Agree Ford not only dropped the ball but demonstrated that part of huge corporations which has drawn consumer anger for decades-indifference to the customers investment. I read posts here for years and saw owner after owner who was already underwater on his purchase and didn't have the option of bailing out. Then, adding insult to injury, his dealer wouldn't give him a loaner car so it cost him days off of work that he couldn't afford.
 

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Part 2: how to drive your Powershift equipped Focus to reduce low speed jerkiness, and general poor driving. I am listing here a number of guidelines to help folks in getting a better experience out of their Powershift transmission. I owned a Powershift equipped Focus for three years, and was quite good at making it behave. Do realize that due to the nature of it's design, it will never be as smooth as an automatic. Also be aware that some transmissions do have issues, and these guidelines will not fix that.

- At low speeds, be very deliberate with the throttle and avoid being on and off it too much. Smooth, deliberate throttle motions will equate to smooth driving at any speed. What happens with erratic throttle input is that the gearbox is trying to do too many things at once. It may have just upshifted into a higher gear, but now you are giving it more throttle so it wants to downshift again, then if you lift off the throttle while it's doing that it's now in the middle of a shift and has to put you back into a gear and release the clutch at the appropriate RPM so it doesn't buck and jerk. What ultimately happens is that the computer cannot keep up with erratic throttle inputs. Plan ahead only give it throttle when you know you won't have to come off it right away.

- Realize that at low speeds, the clutch will always be engaged (that is, connecting the engine and transmission) until very low RPMs, generally around 1000 or so it will disengage. This means that when you release the throttle after just having accelerated, you are still in gear and are engine braking. The vehicle will generally try and upshift as much as possible to smooth this out, so it's not felt as much by the driver. Try to avoid changing speed too much at very low speeds (under 5-10 mph) as the transmission will generally not be able to keep up quickly enough, and it may get caught between shifts.

- In heavy traffic, don't let the car "creep" forward by just letting your foot off the brake too much. It's OK in small doses, but can overheat the clutch if you do it too much. The clutch overheating can cause a warning to appear, and can cause the gearbox to not operate correctly until it has cooled. Additionally, in heavy traffic like this try and keep a bit more distance between you and the vehicle in front, so you can accelerate steadily, which can help with clutch temperatures and will also be a bit smoother for you.

- If equipped, try using SelectShift to shift at lower speeds. This will keep the transmission locked in the gear of your choosing. I used this very often at low speeds as it keeps the gearbox from shifting too much. Do note that, as stated above, this uses a clutch so when engine braking you will feel the engine slowing you down much more then you would with an automatic. If you keep it in too low of a gear it can still be quite jerky (again, very smooth throttle inputs will help). It's easy to notice this if you keep the gearbox in first, and accelerate to 5-10 mph. Let your foot off the throttle and notice how much the car slows, then give it more throttle again and it'll be pretty jerky. It's best to try and upshift into second pretty quick.

- At any speed, commit to your throttle inputs. Complaints of the transmission "banging into gear" are usually just the clutch being engaged when the RPMs aren't matched well. This will cause a sudden surge as the engine is suddenly changing RPM. This often happens because the accelerator is pressed enough to cause the transmission to downshift, then the throttle is lifted for whatever reason, then it is pressed in again, all before the transmission can shift into a gear. Try to avoid this.

**The biggest thing for any Powershift equipped Focus driver to realize is that this is NOT an automatic transmission, and cannot be driven like one. Once that is realized many folks have a easier time driving it. It may take some time to adapt to how it operates, but once you do you will generally have a better experience with it.
The mass pubic aren't looking or wanting to deal with this when they are wanting a reliable basic vehicle at this price point.......Ford should of stuck w/ the atx, yeah it wouldn't get the mpg thou. Would the mass pubic paid additional $1000. or so for a proper dsg trans?
 

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Who knows? Why not get it repaired if needed & ship it down the road?


I just took advantage of that ‘extended warranty one-time’ repair on my DCT trans at the Ford Dealer. The car is actually driving pretty smooth right now w/o shudder, but how long do you think that will last & will the shudder eventually come back?




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I just took advantage of that ‘extended warranty one-time’ repair on my DCT trans at the Ford Dealer. The car is actually driving pretty smooth right now w/o shudder, but how long do you think that will last & will the shudder eventually come back?




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We’ve gotten about 20k miles out of each set of clutches. That for us it’s been 4 clutches in 80k miles
 

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We’ve gotten about 20k miles out of each set of clutches. That for us it’s been 4 clutches in 80k miles
So whats that tell 'ya? Great ready to move on......or best to have your walking shoes on.
 
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