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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so I adjusted only one side, car was veering to the right and steering wheel was tilting in the same direction.

I went under and adjusted the tie rod end on the passenger side. This fixed my steering wheel tilt and adjusted the alignment much better. It now drives straight.

The only issue I have is that it will slowly drift to the right, do I need to adjust the tie rod end a bit more? - Is there another portion that might need replacement or adjusting?
 

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You need to get a professional alignment done. Anything you do yourself should just be a temporary fix. There's no way for you to tell how much toe you have right now.
 

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Moved to "Brakes, Suspension & Body Chassis". I have to agree. It's not expensive to have a full alignment done. Plus it's cheaper than having to replace tires every 15,000 miles.
 

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You can get it aligned well at home, but it takes some measuring to check it & get it done right. (Toe)

Old threads on shade tree alignment ARE in here, takes fishing line - mechanic's ruler - and some info. Won't try to detail it for now, no point in a long post unless there's interest.

Slight drift to the right is normal on a "crowned" road, tilt to the left should do the opposite & straight only if it's flat.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Of course it's temporary! I need to fix this because right now I don't have the ability to get to a mechanic.

I just needed to know if I could do something to fix this problem before I lose a tire, too. I know it will be off a little bit but if I can adjust it until it is fixed properly I should be ok?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You can get it aligned well at home, but it takes some measuring to check it & get it done right. (Toe)

Old threads on shade tree alignment ARE in here, takes fishing line - mechanic's ruler - and some info. Won't try to detail it for now, no point in a long post unless there's interest.

Slight drift to the right is normal on a "crowned" road, tilt to the left should do the opposite & straight only if it's flat.
Yes, I have seen a lot of videos on YouTube. There are so many I don't know which to follow. So I was thinking just take notes on each and see what matches up.

The threads on here I will read into as well. I know you can get it done pretty well at home, a few mm off even from the machines. But I need this done for lack of funds for now.
 

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OK - here's the skinnny on how to do it for ours, I think the MkII's are close enough in measurements to the mkI's for the info. to work.

First you need fishing line & a mechanic's ruler that measures in 32nds, plus something to string it from front to rear of the car (I used jackstands).

String it level with the wheel centers, and line it up an even distance from the front wheel center & 5/32 further out from the rear one (track is narrower in the rear, this gets it parallel).

Then the pencil & paper come in as you measure to the front & rear of each rim from the string. Ruler just under the line makes it easy to read. My SVT 6 spokes make this part easier, as the center cap & rim edges line up, reducing the measuring needed.

Look at the numbers after doing both sides, and you can see how the wheels are pointed.

Front wheels are prob. turned to one side or the other a touch, if one is turned in a couple 32nds & the other is out the same they're perfect. Slight total to a turned out position (toe out) is OK in front, no toe in.

Rears I used 2/32 in at the front vs. the center, it would be twice that edge to edge. No more than that if possible, and in the back you want the two sides to agree, since those wheels aren't supposed to be turned! When they don't agree in the rear, it'll "dog track" a bit with the tail not following the front of the car straight.

Off to the outside by 1/32 in the front would be fine (total) and if a rear is off by that it isn't tragic (I ended up 1/32 extra toe in on the rear corner that needed adj.).

If you get it within those numbers, you're as close as any tire shop could do it.

I found the measurements repeatable after driving & rechecking, even on a surface that wasn't perfectly flat. Looseness in the suspension would make it hard to get good numbers, no-one can align something that wiggles.

Post up any questions on how this works & I'll try to explain better as needed.

Cheers

P.S. - most pocket mechanic's rulers (6" thin steel) are set up with a slide stopper that doubles as a pocket clip (Central brand, find it at any good Hdwe. cheap). I just set that marker at 2+ 5/32, set the front hubcap to line at 2" & the rear at the mark to make lining it up easy.
 

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Uh, the car is SUPPOSED to veer right when the steering wheel is turned right. Meaning OP probably adjusted for a worn part. You generally adjust BOTH side rod ends when adjusting unless you have positive measurement evidence showing one side only is not straight like needed. When you adjust only one side then you kill toe and kiss those tires goodbye. You cannot judge that with how the car seems to track alone and a mistake trying to do it. Also, only adjusting one side and then it seems much better is already an indicator of looseness in that side needing fixing.

I line up my own cars too and been doing so for many years. First MAJOR error I see is rule #1 broken. NEVER adjust a front end that you are not 100% sure is solid as a rock with no looseness in it at all. You can misadjust a car easily to seem like it will drive pretty good at least to the unlearned and then suddenly lose complete control of the car when it does something really weird and unexpected at an all out panic stop. It comes from the worn parts you didn't check for, the car's inertia and weight will make certain adjustment moves seem right but when the car suddenly shifts all weight to one corner or another in a panic stop then the worn part gives to change geometry and and no way are you going to recover from a skid caused by that since it will be at high G and inertia then working against anything you do. Or, all your misadjusting actually has made your potential accident situation much worse.

I strongly suggest OP get the car professionally aligned, already displayed enough errant thinking I wouldn't be telling him more, it only puts him in more trouble doing so.

Why I never really give any detailed tips on how I align mine, not hard but the application of that in the hands of an incompetent (nothing personal here, simply the 100% truth) is a disaster waiting to happen. I personally would feel very bad about anything I would have added to that. Having already been there once I can say it is not a good feeling at all.

' if I can adjust it until it is fixed properly I should be ok?'

You're asking us? I thought YOU chose to do the work. Where's your confidence in your own skills and the problem there. Our telling you that you can do it does not guarantee an answer favorable to you. And of course, the car does not care and will do what it will and without caring about how much money you have. You quite literally are playing with your life here, the next few answers better be dead (literally) correct ones for you. One either has the COMPLETE skills to do this, or they don't and need to leave it to others. No in between.

I'm truly sorry if I'm scaring you but you DO need to be. You NEVER align a car that has loose parts in it. It cannot be done.
 
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