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Discussion Starter #1
I fixed the A/C leak on our '01 ZX3 by replacing the accumulator, the hose from the accumulator to pump and condensor and the hose from the evaporator to the accumulator. In the process I also replaced the orifice tube (which was a pain as this joint leaked upon reassembly!). When I originally opened the system it had a small amount of pressure, it was simply decaying to low to use.

I tried to dump oil out of the accumulator, however at best ~ 1oz came out., I could cut it open to see what remains.. however this seems messy.

The system has now held vacuum for over 24 hours, so I'm ready to charge however I have no idea how much oil to add?

Thanks for your help.
 

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Plz check the "sticky" whynot wrote up, with ALL the details on the project you are into....

(It's at the top of the page,,,)

luck!
 

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Use pressurized oil- read the back of it. The front says, for example, 3 oz, but that's 1 oz of refrigerant and 2 oz of oil. You'll find cans called "First Charge" that contain more oil and refrigerant. I suggest using one of those and the little cans of oil to fill it to the correct amount. You can go over by a little percentage, and it won't hurt anything. Charge by low side pressure with the AC running, and search online for an ambient temp/pressure chart so you don't overfill if the ambient temps are around 60F. If you can't find one, I'd charge on the lower end of the scale around 30-35 psi at this time of year. Otherwise you might end up with too much refrigerant. Too much will give you lukewarm air in the hottest part of the year. I'd rather have the low pressure switch cycle the AC during the fall and spring than have lukewarm AC in the summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
From everything I can find I appear to have the FS10 style of compressor.

A place to compare Ford compressors is here: http://www.ttacparts.com/catalog_pdf/WEB_Comp_Dodge_thru_Nipp.pdf

Here is states this compressor uses the PAG 46 oil: http://www.wrenchead.ca/pub/PAG_oils_application-05.pdf

By searching for more on the FS10 compressor I found the following on an F150 forum:

http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/525282-replacing-air-conditioner-compressor.html

Refrigerant Oil Addition

The FS-10 A/C compressor (19703) uses a unique high-quality refrigerant oil (F2AZ-19577-AC), Motorcraft Part Number YN-12B or an equivalent refrigerant oil meeting Ford specification WSH-M1C231-B. It is extremely important that only the specified type and quantity of refrigerant oil be used in the FS-10 A/C compressor. If there is a surplus of oil in the system, it will circulate with the refrigerant, reducing the cooling capacity of the system. Using too little oil or oil not meeting the Ford specification will result in poor lubrication of the A/C compressor.

When replacing a component of the refrigerant system, the procedures in this section must be followed to ensure that the total oil charge in the system is correct after the new part is installed.

When the A/C compressor is operated, oil gradually leaves the A/C compressor and is circulated through the system with the refrigerant. Eventually, a balanced condition is reached in which a certain amount of oil is retained in the A/C compressor and a certain amount is continually circulated. If a component of the system is removed after the system has been operated, some oil will go with it. To maintain the original total oil charge, add oil as required to the new replacement part.

The procedures for replacing oil are as follows: During A/C Compressor Replacement

NOTE: The suction accumulator/drier (19C836) and orifice tube should also be replaced when the A/C compressor is replaced.

A new service replacement FS-10 A/C compressor contains no refrigerant oil. Prior to installing the replacement A/C compressor, drain the refrigerant oil from the removed A/C compressor into a calibrated container. The shaft should be rotated about six to eight revolutions while pouring the oil from the ports. This effectively empties the A/C compressor of oil.

Obtain a clean container that can also be used as a measuring device.

Place the disc and hub assembly on the compressor shaft so the shaft can be rotated.
If the amount of oil drained from the old A/C compressor was between 85 and 142 ml (3 and 5 oz.), pour the same amount plus one ounce of clean Motorcraft YN-12B refrigerant oil into the new A/C compressor.
If the amount of oil that was removed from the old A/C compressor is greater than 142 ml (5 oz.), pour 142 ml (5 oz.) of clean Motorcraft YN-12B refrigerant oil into the new A/C compressor.
If the amount of refrigerant oil that was removed from the old A/C compressor is less than 85 ml (3 oz.), pour 85 ml (3 oz.) of clean Motorcraft YN-12B refrigerant oil into the new A/C compressor.

R-134a Refrigerant Oil

CAUTION: Do not add R-12 refrigerant oil YN-9 to an R-134a system. Also, do not add R-134a refrigerant YN-12B to an R-12 system. These two refrigerant oils are not compatible and mixing the two could result in A/C system damage.

The refrigerant oil used in an R-134a refrigerant system is a polyalkylene glycol (PAG) oil meeting Ford specification WSH-M1C231-B or equivalent. This type of refrigerant oil, Motorcraft YN-12B, was made especially for R-134a A/C systems and is not suitable for use in R-12 systems. Never use an R-134a refrigerant oil in an R-12 system.

R-12 systems require the use of a mineral-based refrigerant oil with special additives. This refrigerant oil is known as YN-9. This refrigerant oil was developed for use in R-12 systems only and is not suitable for use in R-134a A/C systems. During Component Replacement

When replacing other components of the air conditioning system, measured quantities of the specified refrigerant oil should be added to the component to ensure that the total oil charge in the system is correct before the system is operated.

Clean refrigerant oil should be poured directly into the replacement components as follows:

A/C evaporator core (19860) (19860): add 90 ml (3 oz.).
A/C condenser core (19712) (19712): add 30 ml (1 oz.).
Accumulator: drain oil from removed suction accumulator/drier. Add same amount plus 60 ml (2 oz.) of clean refrigerant oil to new accumulator.

Other Refrigerant System Components

If any other component such as an A/C evaporator core orifice (19D990) or a hose is replaced, 59 ml (2 oz) additional refrigerant oil is necessary unless a hose bursts with a fully charged system. Then, the addition of refrigerant oil will be necessary with the amount to be determined by the technician. The suction accumulator/drier should also be replaced under these circumstances.
 

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I don't know why they advise people to do it like this. With a vacuum on the system, you should have little to no oil. If you pour it in like this, then recharge, you're running the risk of having moisture from the atmosphere in the system with the refrigerant. Refrigerant + moisture = no good.

Now, this might be in very small amounts and not worth worrying about unless you live somewhere like I do where the humidity is close to 100% all the time. I wish we all had access to the reclamation machines that professional shops use to recycle refrigerant. That would insure the proper amount of oil in the system at all times. Unfortunately, those machines are priced in the 5 digit range.
 

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I don't know why they advise people to do it like this. With a vacuum on the system, you should have little to no oil. If you pour it in like this, then recharge, you're running the risk of having moisture from the atmosphere in the system with the refrigerant. Refrigerant + moisture = no good.

Now, this might be in very small amounts and not worth worrying about unless you live somewhere like I do where the humidity is close to 100% all the time. I wish we all had access to the reclamation machines that professional shops use to recycle refrigerant. That would insure the proper amount of oil in the system at all times. Unfortunately, those machines are priced in the 5 digit range.
The vacuum placed on the refrigerant system does NOT remove all the oil from the system. The oil doesn't vaporize like moisture or refrigerant, the machine simply sucks in some oil as the refrigerant vapor migrates toward the service ports. The recovery machine may suck up more oil in systems that have service ports located in low-lying areas due to gravity.

OP - I can't tell based on your original post if you replaced the condenser or just the hose....

But, you are supposed to drill a 1" hole in the bottom of the old accumulator and drain all the oil out. Refill the new accumulator with the amount drained from the old PLUS 90 milliliters, PLUS the amount drained during recovery.

I generally take care to not "over-estimate" the amount drained from recovery. I'd imagine you just vented the system and have no idea how much oil was in there. If that's the case I'd put about a half-ounce additional in there.

If you replaced the condenser as well, you are supposed to add another 30 milliliters.

All all oil directly to the accumulator if you are replacing it. There is a pinhole in the bottom of the suction umbrella that limits the amount of oil the compressor is allowed to intake. You run no risk whatsoever of running dry or hydrolocking (given the compressor hasn't been drained during your accumulator/condenser service). I also wouldn't be concerned much with adding the oil prior to vacuum. If it sucks up more oil during vacuum - you can just measure and re-add. Make sure you charge under vacuum because it's much easier and it will make sure the new dessicant in your accumulator has been completely dried and is ready to soak up any residual moisture once you get it charged up.

Make sure NOT to use ANY R134a blend that contains a leak sealer and/or a dye. Too much dye is a bad thing...There will be a dye pellet inside any OEM replacement accumulator and leak sealer is just a generally bad idea for lots of reasons. I'd also advise against any "conditioners" or "enhancers". These are generally light hydrocarbon or ammonia-based vapors that have a lower vaporization temp than R134a. They don't provide much improvement (if any) and are considered a contaminant in the service industry. My shops would detect this contaminant and charge you extra for isolated recover and recycling. Pure R134a is all you need and all you should pay for.
 
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