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Discussion Starter #1
I haven't owned my focus very long (a few months) and she seems to have random problems pop up often. I'm hoping its just coincidence. Sticky caliper-just replaced all four calipers/hoses/rotors and flushed synthetic brake fluid. Then a week later PCV hose had a good sized gash in it. 4 hours later I have a new hose and very clean intake runners/flappers. Now... I have a rear main seal leak. First I assumed it was the oil pan (since I had it off for bsd and I don't trust gasket makers much) but there was zero sign of oil pan leaking and I could feel oil residue higher in the bellhousing. So, since I have to separate the engine and trans... I might as well replace the clutch and dmf (120K miles on original).

The cost is very similar to replace with a conventional solid piece flywheel+clutch as it would be to purchase a new dmf+clutch. I only have experience with lightened flywheels on sport bikes. I assume it will feel snappier in lower gears and decel will be more prominent. I also would expect to feel the powerstrokes (vibration) specifically at low rpm. What I want to know is how streetable the cars are to drive. On the interstate, 3000rpm is quite high so I don't see the engine "lugging" and pulsing. Is there any known or speculated durability issues? Will the lack of cushion increase wear on the drivetrain?

Also, if anyone has recommendations on a quality replacement RMS please speak up. Thanks!
 

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If your looking to replace your clutch w/ a solid flywheel setup, a great kit is Exedy's oem replacement= one piece flywheel/disc & pressure plate. CFM & others have it for about $425.00. For mount mounts, would you keep the oem style mount or go w/ a poly mount? The d/m of course makes it easier on the trans when shifting. Same as the stick 'strokes. I have a vf engineering dsm & dogbone along w/ a bsd plug. When I have to replace the psm, I'd think if I go w/ a poly one, I'd stick w/ the d/m vs a one piece flywheel. Or stick w/ the oem motorcraft mount & go w/ the one piece flywheel. I do like the driveablity of the d/m at slow rpm's= just at idle going up driveways & such. You can hear the springs a little working. Hope that helps you.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll go oem for mounts. The gears seem super short to me, so I rarely lug the engine. The sweet spot seems to be 2-3500rpm for daily driving. You could quite literally shift through every gear by the time you hit 30mph, haha. The Exedy brand flywheel/clutch kit is what I was looking at for smf purchase. Otherwise I'll be a cheapazz and pick up a dmf/clutch from rockauto if the exedy has any complaints. A rear main seal, throwout bearing, slave cylinder, and probably input shaft bearing for the trans will be on the list... because I'm already there and I can. Anything else on these cars I should do as preventative maintenance while its apart?
 

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How about changing out the trans fluid? Use the ford oil. Throw bearing/ slave cylinder is the same on the foci. Are you running a poly dogbone? If not, I'd get one coming.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I planned on replacing the fluid, too. What is significant about a poly dogbone?
 

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Keeps your engine from doing backflips under hard acceleration. Makes for a more responsive-feeling gas pedal, from my experience with mine. There's a tad more vibration in the car, but it's very minor; I got used to it within a couple days and couldn't even tell.
 

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Keeps your engine from doing backflips under hard acceleration. Makes for a more responsive-feeling gas pedal, from my experience with mine. There's a tad more vibration in the car, but it's very minor; I got used to it within a couple days and couldn't even tell.
This^^^^^^^^ I recommend adding a poly dogbone & a Steeda sts too. Really keeps the motor from rolling around.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The car just received new axles, bearings, ball joints, poly torque mount, and of course rear main seal and exedy OEM clutch/flywheel. Even though the flywheel is about 8-10lbs lighter than the original (and is solid mass instead of dual mass) driveability is just as easy and comfortable as the original ford stuff. Smooth idle, positive-but-predictable clutch engagement, and increased throttle response in lower gears. Absolutely no chatter or vibrations anywhere. All in all, a pretty good investment.... and the oil stays in the car now, too!
 

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Excellent!

Another vote for the Exedy replacement.
 

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Thank you very much for posting your experience with your SMF. I've been wondering what route I would take when my clutch needs to be replaced and I'm pretty much decided on the Exedy flywheel when I replace the clutch. I really don't know why they had to go with the DMF for this car. My 2012 Mustang V6 had one too and actually caused a lot of random vibration during decel at certain RPMs. I feel DMFs are just more trouble than they're worth, not to mention the fact that you can't resurface them.
 

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The dm's are for the smoothness & are easier on the trans. Great review of the Exedy oem replacement!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Honestly the car is smoother now with the new stuff than before... which is the opposite of what I have heard about solid flywheels AND poly torque mounts. I can lug it down to 1200rpm and not feel any vibrations or ill effects... just as smooth as OEM. Mind you, the clutch disk has 4 springs which each have a good 1.5 inches of travel (which in my opinion is quite a bit of "cushion") 1-2 shift has improved and the car doesn't "hang out" at high rpm so much when shifting. My only gripe is under moderate acceleration, it seems as though I feel the axles or something load related. They are new toughone axles from advance auto. I'll let those wear in before investigating. Its very subtle and not audible. It sort of feels like when a wheel is not balanced perfect, but only under heavy load. Cruise and normal driving are butter smooth. I suppose it could be feedback from the poly mount, too (being load/torque related). Its even more likely that I am anal about automotive and construction work, however.

As for the exedy kit, I honestly am having a hard time finding any criticism, but I'll try... pick yourself up six 8mm-1.25 x 20mm flange head bolts in 10.9 grade. My kit did NOT come with new pressure plate bolts and the flywheel will accept a much longer bolt than the stubby original stuff. More threads biting with threadlocker isn't a bad thing IMO. Also, the slave cylinder bleeder is of a different style than OEM. Instead of a bleeder screw that you would loosen/tighten (similar to what you'd find on brake calipers) it is a hollow stud/nipple type of bleeder with a hole on one side and a channel on the bottom side of the hole in the slave case. Twist the bleeder so the hole points UP and it seals/closes. Twist it 180 degrees so the hole points DOWN and the hole aligns with the channel allowing air/fluid to escape the nipple. Its a quick and simple design (much better than fitting an 8mm wrench down there) but without directions it took me 10-15 minutes to see what they were trying to accomplish. A good impact gun and impact rated sockets (most common was 13mm, 15mm, and18mm flavors) for loosening stubborn bolts like the crossmember and motor mounts is a must. Quality torque wrenches are a MUST. I used my 1/4 inch in/lb rated one a bit and my 3/8 (90ft/lb rated) a LOT and even my 1/2 250ft/lb wrench once for the axle nuts. I acquired that big sonabish from doing head studs on my 6.0L powerstroke, talk about a workout! haha You'll also need an external torx socket size E14 for the six flywheel bolts. I read on some how-tos that guys used a regular 12 point socket. DON'T DO THAT YOU FRICKIN HACK. They get torqued to 86 ft/lbs and have thread locker, use the right tool for the job! haha. Also, wire wheel each fastener to clean the thread and flange so you have fresh threads for your threadlocker or fastener assembly lube. It'll provide a more accurate torque reading. So there you have it!

The good (exedy clutch)
The bad (no PP bolts)
and the Ugly (me)
 
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I find that the stock or aftermarket stock replacement dogbone mounts are ok for a daily driver, but if you track the car even once buy the poly mount.

I killed 4 regular ones in less than 2 years with a stock 2L duratec on the track before I bought a Polly one which is still in perfect condition after around 10 track days.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I expected the poly dogbone to add vibrations and other unwanted feedback through the car (especially with a balance shaft delete) but there is literally no change in behavior from the stock rubbers. It was a pleasant surprise. The inner cv joint must have been tight and needed a little time to wear in because the shudder has disappeared after 100 miles of driving.
 

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When I changed to the poly dogbone I immediately noticed a difference, it wasn't bad, but noticeable, even cranking the engine over sounded different
 

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When I changed to the poly dogbone I immediately noticed a difference, it wasn't bad, but noticeable, even cranking the engine over sounded different
Poly bushed is a more solid connection vs rubber bushed.
 
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