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Focus 2006. We are told to use octane 87 and not ethanol but here in Canada, all brands are adding up to 10% ethanol in their 87.
Is this bad? What's the alternative?
 

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BACON?
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they do the same here in the US. Not much that you can do. Its not good, but really not bad either. the ethanol will clean out any old gunk from the system and could clog the filter after the first couple of uses (happened on my boat, 20 years of gasoline, then added the 10% ethanol gas and it clogged after a few hours of use.

They have been adding the ethanol for street use here for a while now, not many issues with newer cars. i doubt you will have any issues with your 2006.
 

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lemeq......" may contain up to 10% ethanol" is on a sticker on the 87, 89 and 91 octane pumps, at least at Chevron stations here in the lower mainland. The 94 octane is the only one that does not have the ethanol. I'm sure that the other companies are the same here.
 

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The warning not to use Ethanol is to not use the E-85 form.
It has nothing tto do with the 10% in most gasoline now sold.
Years and years ago car oeners were up in arm about 10% ethanol, but all cars made for the past 20 years ARE designed to accept the 10% ethanol.
So do not worry about buying gasoline with up to 10% ethanol.
 

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E85 is a moot point in Canada......it basically ain't available. The 10% ethanol was mandated (emissions?) by our federal gov't (up from 5%), if I remember correctly, and is basically standard now. For Canada, Ford seems to be more concerned about the amount of metallic compounds used in some of our "premium" fuels and recommends not using them in cars where 87 (like the Focus) is recommended. There is a warning not to use fuel containing methanol, which maybe is what lemeq noticed. 10% ethanol is not a concern as Elizabeth has mentioned.
 

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The only problem with 10% ethanol is that the stuff turns 'old' and bad
I think that it absorbs moisture.
A real problem if this stuff gets left in gas tanks of generators, lawn mowers, snow blowers for any time like between seasons. I drain it off and kill weeds with it
 

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I'm overwhelmed by the numerous and prompt answers. Thank you all. What a nice community!
 

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The only problem with 10% ethanol is that the stuff turns 'old' and bad
I think that it absorbs moisture.
A real problem if this stuff gets left in gas tanks of generators, lawn mowers, snow blowers for any time like between seasons. I drain it off and kill weeds with it
You are correct sir. E10 fuel only lasts 90 days, and after that it separates into ethanol and gasoline. It would be nice if we had a better alternative. Water infusing causes phase separation when .5% water is absorbed by the ethanol. That's basically 3.8 tsp/gal. If you want to take care of your lawn mower or other equipment, then you should drain gasoline after the season.

Chevy Volt owners are going to be hurt over this- I see clogged fuel pumps, and detonation in their futures. I do not know if fuel stabilizers will work on E10. Apparently so, but choose carefully. The second reference contains an explanation and chart of various additives- not all for stabilization.

Reference:
http://www.fueltestkit.com/what_is_gasoline_e10.html

http://www.fuel-testers.com/is_gas_additive_safe_with_e10_list.html
 

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Ethanol is absolute crap...

...and also a BIG lie. It will absolutely yield a 10% decrease in MPG, has no shelf life and will introduce moisture and corrosion into your fuel system. Screw the corn growers and ethanol lobby because they are screwing every driver, every day.
 

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Got Bewst?
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I'm guessing I'm the only one in here that has a methanol injection system on their car.

Ethanol, if anything like methanol, raises the octane levels in fuel. I flip on my meth pump and it's like running race gas but because it's mixed 50/50 with water, my o2 sensors and wideband never last long.
 

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higher octane is only of any use if your engine is built for it, I have to run 93 in my 93 buick Park ave, because its supercharged.but its useless to run it in my 2000 se , the higher the octane to slower it burns.
 

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My engine is tuned for 91 in my fofo but I want to get it tuned for the meth or... About 116 octane. The methanol adds between 20-25 octane points to the gas turning premium into jet fuel...
 

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...and also a BIG lie. It will absolutely yield a 10% decrease in MPG, has no shelf life and will introduce moisture and corrosion into your fuel system. Screw the corn growers and ethanol lobby because they are screwing every driver, every day.
You only get corrosion when you put it in a car the isn't flex fuel...
 

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C2H5OH
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...and also a BIG lie. It will absolutely yield a 10% decrease in MPG, has no shelf life and will introduce moisture and corrosion into your fuel system. Screw the corn growers and ethanol lobby because they are screwing every driver, every day.
And you can provide proof to this?

If not I'd suggest you do some heavy reading/research.



AMEN to that, ethanol sucks ass and is nothing but a lobbying result.

Really?
So a renewable, domestically made fuel isn't worth some effort? (granted corn isn't' ideal but it's all that's out there right now)



There are a good many days that I wish the 'internet' never existed, for if it didn't there wouldn't be so much BS lying around. People need to learn how to separate advertising fro lobbying from fact.
 

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http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/technologies_and_fuels/biofuels/the-truth-about-ethanol.html

Accurate lifecycle emissions accounting requires that all of the energy and inputs associated with growing, producing, delivering, and using any biofuel are tracked, including emissions associated with changes in land use. Most analyses conducted before 2008 indicate that corn ethanol delivers a 10 to 20 percent reduction in global warming emissions over its lifecycle compared with gasoline, but these analyses did not include land use changes. The reduction is modest because corn production requires a significant amount of fossil fuel inputs for farm operations, processing and distilling, and fertilizer production (generally natural gas). Fertilizers used for corn production also generate a substantial amount of nitrous oxide, a potent global warming pollutant, as unused fertilizer breaks down in the field. In addition, many corn ethanol production facilities operate on natural gas; if new production facilities use coal instead, the emission benefits of corn ethanol could be reduced or eliminated.

Several new studies have focused on the contribution of land use changes to lifecycle global warming pollution. If land is converted from forest to cropland, there can be a significant increase in global warming pollution. Recent estimates suggest that the emissions from these changes in land use may be huge and could dramatically shift the balance of risks and rewards for some kinds of ethanol. For example, when lifecycle analysis of corn ethanol includes land use changes caused by using corn for ethanol rather than food or animal feed, the lifecycle emissions can end up as high as gasoline or potentially much higher (see the UCS Land Use Fact Sheet for more details).
 

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And there is your research ladies and gentlemen....i prefer the ol'skool fuel (non-leaded) of course....all this bio-fuel stuff sounds nice but its not touching my 54 Ford F100!!!
 

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C2H5OH
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^And the proof to the rest of your statements?


I find it funny how there is such a concern with bio-fuel yet there is very little of the same research available for fossil fuel. How much land is lost for oil drilling? How much energy is used for production? etc.
The 'debate' is not evenly waged; and I really don't care who'd win. I just want an even and clean fight.
 

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The corrosion part? Seals and o-rings need to be HNBR because ethanol is hygroscopic and it would dry out regular synthetic seals and o-rings. Fuel lines now a days are HNBR lined. Ethanol itself isn't corrosive to metal but the moister it absorbs is. Fuel rails are internally chrome lined to give a smooth surface to prevent pitting.

If I still had my Ranger I would get a picture of the inside of the fuel rail and show you all the o-rings are green (HNBR)
 
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