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Discussion Starter #1
Hei!
I just bought an old Ford Focus from 1994.
This morning I had to see that the temperatures dropped to -8°C (Finland) and I don't have the right connector for the pre-heat system.
I have to use the car today but as it is Sunday I can not go to a shop to buy the right cable.
Does anyone here has some advice what I can do, or which part of the motor I could warm up from the outside (I have a little heat blower normaly for onside the car).
Btw: I have no idea about cars (sorry), so please write in a way that I can understand :D

Thank you!

Miira
 

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During the Second World War German troops on the Eastern Front were plagued by sub zero temperatures. In many instances, their equipment was unusable due to oil that was as thick as molasses. To solve their dilemma of cold oil they would start fires underneath the engines of their vehicles and other equipment to warm them up. Just a thought:)
 

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FINLAND? Awesome metal lovers rejoice! BTW i would love to go there sometime lolz but with the heating up of the car if you can't start it i don't know if lighting up a fire under your car would help mind you the potential it might have by burning your wiring?

im posting some stuff found on the netz here



Extremely cold temperatures can take your car hostage. Winter’s frigid grip can drain the power from your battery, freeze the fluids in your engine, freeze your gas line and gel your engine oil.

Maximize Power:


As the temperature drops, so does your battery’s starting power. You can maximize starting power by turning off all accessories—including the heater, radio and lights – before you attempt to start the car. If the car engine doesn’t turnover, you may need a jump-start.

Start Right:

The owner’s manual is the best source for guidance on how to start the car in cold weather. In general, motorists should ensure that all accessories are turned off before attempting to start the car. For carbureted cars, depress the accelerator once and release it. For fuel-injected vehicles, don’t touch the pedal. Turn the key and hold it for only about 20 seconds. Over grinding the starter can cause mechanical damage. If the engine fails to turn over, wait a couple of minutes and try again.

Freeze-proof the Fluids:

The coolant in your car’s radiator should test to 35 degrees below zero and should appear as a bright green, pink or blue color. If it tests to a high temperature, it may freeze as the outside temperature matches the tested temperature. You can purchase a turkey-baster style tester (hydrometer) at an auto parts store or have a qualified technician test the coolant for you. If the coolant level is low, add a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water. For better protection in the extreme cold, you may go as high as a 70/30 mixture of antifreeze and water, but don’t exceed more than 70 percent antifreeze. If the fluid is anything other than the green, pink or blue color, the system should be flushed and replaced with 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water. You can also freeze-proof your windshield washer fluid by using a 100 percent solution of washer fluid. Don’t add any water to the fluid because you increase the chance of it freezing.

Fill ‘er Up:

You can prevent your gas line from freezing by keeping the tank as full as possible.

Use a Thinner Oil:

In the extreme cold, oil thickens and doesn’t flow quickly to vital engine parts that need lubrication. A lightweight, winter-grade oil flows easier in cold weather and increases fuel economy. A heavier oil, combined with low battery output, slows the movement of engine parts and in some cases, makes it impossible for the engine to crank fast enough to start. Oil containers have a rating label that includes information about oil viscosity. For example, SAE 10W-30 oil, with an API rating of SH, is thicker at lower temperatures than SAE 5W-30 oil with the same API rating. The “W” means the oil is suitable for winter use. AAA recommends using lightweight winter oil for winter driving, but check your owner’s manual for the proper weight for your car and change the oil every three months or 3,000 miles.

Start Out Slowly:

Once your engine is running for at least a minute, you may start driving, but don’t accelerate too quickly during the first mile or two. Because of the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning, don’t let your car warm up in the garage for a long period of time, especially if you have an attached garage. The fumes easily can seep into the house and overcome those inside, even with an open garage door.

Allow the car to sit in the Park or Neutral position after starting. The oil needs time to warm up and thin before you drive. Starting the car and driving off immediately can damage the engine

(This winter safe information was obtained from Ice Pack, a group of public and private agencies in Illinois and Indiana.)
 

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FINLAND? Awesome metal lovers rejoice! BTW i would love to go there sometime lolz but with the heating up of the car if you can't start it i don't know if lighting up a fire under your car would help mind you the potential it might have by burning your wiring?

im posting some stuff found on the netz here



Extremely cold temperatures can take your car hostage. Winter’s frigid grip can drain the power from your battery, freeze the fluids in your engine, freeze your gas line and gel your engine oil.

Maximize Power:


As the temperature drops, so does your battery’s starting power. You can maximize starting power by turning off all accessories—including the heater, radio and lights – before you attempt to start the car. If the car engine doesn’t turnover, you may need a jump-start.

Start Right:

The owner’s manual is the best source for guidance on how to start the car in cold weather. In general, motorists should ensure that all accessories are turned off before attempting to start the car. For carbureted cars, depress the accelerator once and release it. For fuel-injected vehicles, don’t touch the pedal. Turn the key and hold it for only about 20 seconds. Over grinding the starter can cause mechanical damage. If the engine fails to turn over, wait a couple of minutes and try again.

Freeze-proof the Fluids:

The coolant in your car’s radiator should test to 35 degrees below zero and should appear as a bright green, pink or blue color. If it tests to a high temperature, it may freeze as the outside temperature matches the tested temperature. You can purchase a turkey-baster style tester (hydrometer) at an auto parts store or have a qualified technician test the coolant for you. If the coolant level is low, add a 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water. For better protection in the extreme cold, you may go as high as a 70/30 mixture of antifreeze and water, but don’t exceed more than 70 percent antifreeze. If the fluid is anything other than the green, pink or blue color, the system should be flushed and replaced with 50/50 mixture of antifreeze and water. You can also freeze-proof your windshield washer fluid by using a 100 percent solution of washer fluid. Don’t add any water to the fluid because you increase the chance of it freezing.

Fill ‘er Up:

You can prevent your gas line from freezing by keeping the tank as full as possible.

Use a Thinner Oil:

In the extreme cold, oil thickens and doesn’t flow quickly to vital engine parts that need lubrication. A lightweight, winter-grade oil flows easier in cold weather and increases fuel economy. A heavier oil, combined with low battery output, slows the movement of engine parts and in some cases, makes it impossible for the engine to crank fast enough to start. Oil containers have a rating label that includes information about oil viscosity. For example, SAE 10W-30 oil, with an API rating of SH, is thicker at lower temperatures than SAE 5W-30 oil with the same API rating. The “W” means the oil is suitable for winter use. AAA recommends using lightweight winter oil for winter driving, but check your owner’s manual for the proper weight for your car and change the oil every three months or 3,000 miles.

Start Out Slowly:

Once your engine is running for at least a minute, you may start driving, but don’t accelerate too quickly during the first mile or two. Because of the danger of carbon monoxide poisoning, don’t let your car warm up in the garage for a long period of time, especially if you have an attached garage. The fumes easily can seep into the house and overcome those inside, even with an open garage door.

(This winter safe information was obtained from Ice Pack, a group of public and private agencies in Illinois and Indiana.)
 

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low n slow
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94? must be a concept car because they didnt start making foci til 98
 

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escort maybe 1994? replaced by the focus x2 and up
wikipedia entry http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Escort_(North_America)
For 2001, the sedan was limited to fleet sales only and the Escort moniker on the Escort ZX2 was quietly dropped, making the car officially just ZX2.

The Ford Focus debuted in 2000 and was produced concurrently with the ZX2. Though not without its fans, both then and now, and still fairly well-represented in the automotive aftermarket, the ZX2 was replaced by the Focus ZX3, ZX4 and ZX5. Though the two cars shared the same Zetec engine, there were a few differences. The Focus lacked the exhaust-side VCT, and contained less aggressive camshafts that pushed the power band down a few hundred RPM. They both shared the same block but, due to the different camshafts and the different cylinder head, the torque output for the Focus was bumped up by 8 ft·lbf (11 N·m). Thanks to better gearing and less weight the ZX2 continued to outperform the Focus. The ZX2 continued with little more than 15 in (38 cm) alloy wheels and a rear defroster now offered as standard equipment, and for 2003, a revised front fascia. Production ceased at the end of the 2003 model year.
 

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low n slow
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globally the focus was introduced in 98 WE didnt get the focus til 2000
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the advice!
Maybe I got the year wrong :S sorry...but its a Focus
Fire under the car? Nooo maybe not :D
Florida sounds ok for a holyday. I like Finland a lot and better stay here!
 

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What I use to do living part time in upstate NY , I would put a heat lamp(150 watt old fashion light bulb in a cheap alum universal hang anywhere lamp ) up against the oil pan and leave it all night , the heat from the lamp would keep the oil and the engine warm and it would fire right up even in -deg weather

Tom
 
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