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I'm getting new brake pads but not sure if I should go with EBC greenstuff or Hawk HPS. I'm also getting power slot rotors. Has anyone tested this combination before? And what pads should I get?
 

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I have the power slots and the hawk hps on my svt. I love them.
 

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Hawk HPS on a good SOLID rotor. Slots have one purpose only.....to clean glazed pads which usually only occurs in competitive situations or lapping on the track. They may be pretty to look at, but are overkill for a daily driver and by design, will only shorten pad life.
 

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Actually there are two reasons for slots or holes in a rotor.
1. It gives water a place to go when driving in the wet. You can make one complete revolution of the tire before the brakes sweep off the water in a non slotted rotor.
2. Pads as they get hot out gas and prevent the pads from contacting the rotor.

Both of these situations are more important in a competition situation where a few feet of in effective brakes can cost a race.

If the brakes are bedded in properly and not grossly overheated they will not glaze over. If you do glaze them over the slots certainly won't get rid of it.
 

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The slots also generate more friction. Which is what you want for brakes.

It does reduce the life of the pads, but if you are concerned about stopping fast and are buying upgraded rotors and pads to do so, the lifespan of the pad isn't your first priority.
 

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The slots also generate more friction. Which is what you want for brakes.

It does reduce the life of the pads, but if you are concerned about stopping fast and are buying upgraded rotors and pads to do so, the lifespan of the pad isn't your first priority.
Where did you hear this? How do slots generate more friction if there is less contact area with the pad? Why does this cause quicker wear?

The biggest advantage to slots are that they:
1. remove debris from the firepath - they basically act as a wiper blade for the pad.
2. dissipate a small amount of heat & gas (drilled rotors are better at this)
 

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ok well to answer the original question i would go with the hawk pads. they are the ones i use one every car i own. love them
 

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The slots generate more friction by the trailing edge cutting into the pad more. It catches on the rotor after the gap and gets more bite. At least, that is the explaination I've deduced based upon wear experience. If I am mistaken, I would like to hear the reasoning behind the faster wear.
 

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Interesting - I've never heard that before or experienced that personally. I can see that being more notable if the slots were directly vertical to the hub so that the entire edge was applied to the same line at once but all the rotors I've seen are slanted so that at each point the edge is distributed so that no more than a small spot is touching the pad as any given point.
 

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I'm getting new brake pads but not sure if I should go with EBC greenstuff or Hawk HPS. I'm also getting power slot rotors. Has anyone tested this combination before? And what pads should I get?
Sorry to get away from your question!

I use and frequently recommend the HPS and Power Slot setup. I love the initial bite that the HPS has. I'll take that advantage over the lower dusting ceramics any day. The Power Slots have one of the better coatings out of the rotors we carry and stave off rust a long time.
 

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Actually there are two reasons for slots or holes in a rotor.
1. It gives water a place to go when driving in the wet. You can make one complete revolution of the tire before the brakes sweep off the water in a non slotted rotor.
2. Pads as they get hot out gas and prevent the pads from contacting the rotor.

Both of these situations are more important in a competition situation where a few feet of in effective brakes can cost a race.

If the brakes are bedded in properly and not grossly overheated they will not glaze over. If you do glaze them over the slots certainly won't get rid of it.
Don't forget that holes help you save weight [idea] Hehe, at least in autox when in a light underpowered cars where braking is not too critical. All depends on the application. Hawk HPS and centric blanks are what a lot of us recommend as a top performing street setup. I run HP+ with centric blanks on the autox car, and I would say they are too noisy and dusty for me to recommend as a daily driver setup. They stop great though, and it is more than enough brake to look up sticky Hankook RS-3's. I don't have experience with the EBC, I'm sure there is an equivalent option to Hawks HPS though.
 

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This issue has been beaten to death too many times but I guess it has to be revisited every now and then.

Some of the best automotive and race engineers have posted many reports on this subject. Basically they agree that slots are unneeded on a majority of cars (especially street driven ones) and can actually be counterproductive. Drilling holes is essentially antiquated design. (Stoptech has quite a few of these "white papers" on their web site)

Yes, a handful of high performance cars (Porsche, Benz, etc) still use drilled rotors for evacuation of water VAPOR. These cars use very large swept areas which necessitates this in wet conditions. These rotors are quite different from the ones commonly sold. In most cases, the holes are cast into the rotor and not drilled for structural reasons, the holes are chamfered to minimize spider webbing, and the holes are of a very small diameter to help minimize thermal impacts to the extent possible. That said, even temps across the rotors swept surface are preferred for maximum friction generation. Holes and slots do not allow for this .

Very few pads out gas anymore. Modern pad formulations have pretty much eliminated this issue. Drilled rotors were created to resolve out gassing issues when airplanes (disc brakes were initially invented for airplanes) were using asbestos formulations (which were subsequently carried over to race cars). You don't find too many drilled rotors on either anymore. Slotted rotors have been the primary replacement for racing when needed. In fact, the newest designs are not even full slots anymore. The new designs look something like a letter "C" (about an inch or so in height) placed in precise patterns over the rotor surface. They provide the same cleaning properties with less thermal and structural impact to the rotor. They are also very expensive due to the precision machining needed on an internally vented rotor.

With regards to racing, most teams tend to be very sophisticated when it comes to braking (for good reason) and will have numerous pad formulations and rotor options for a broad range of environmental conditions, tracks, etc. Few are concerned about wear characteristics beyond getting them through the event they are at.

For the typical car guy or gal, balancing the desire for performance, longevity, durability and budget is the goal. A quality solid rotor with a good performance street pad normally addresses most if not all of these desires.
 

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For the typical car guy or gal, balancing the desire for performance, longevity, durability and budget is the goal. A quality solid rotor with a good performance street pad normally addresses most if not all of these desires.
Can't agree more! :)
 

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I currently have ebc redstuff on a solid rotor and im glad i did, those suckers will grip like a mofo. wish i had bought the Hawk hp+ ones but they weren't out at the time.
 

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I have been running Centric blanks and HPS plus pads for a while and I love the combo. I also put on Russel Stainless steel lines which helped a lot.
 

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Who had the best prices on the Hawk HPS pads? Looking to put a set on the front of my SVT. Had the Hawk ceramic pads and they were fine, but I just installed Centric rotors and thought that maybe I should put new pads in. The ceramic pads have plenty of life left, but I don't want to ruin the rotors with old pads. Thoughts and opinions?
 

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Who had the best prices on the Hawk HPS pads? Looking to put a set on the front of my SVT. Had the Hawk ceramic pads and they were fine, but I just installed Centric rotors and thought that maybe I should put new pads in. The ceramic pads have plenty of life left, but I don't want to ruin the rotors with old pads. Thoughts and opinions?

Check with our friends at Tirerack. Good fast service and you know you'll be taken care of.
 
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