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Many of you missed the cardinal rule of new car buying, which is to NEVER buy the first year of any new model and even more if it spouts new tech of any kind. I broke that rule myself and knowing it when I bought the first year of Focus and got handed 8 recall or other safety issues that thankfully I was able to do all myself at zero cost.

The dry clutch thing? I used to argue with others over dry centrifugal clutch settings on 1500+ hp. mountain motor prostock cars, you figure out pretty quick that a dry clutch changes engagement if it sits even 5 minutes to cool down. Back to back applications are as different as night to day. The engagement is all over the place and using the best dry clutch materials made on earth. Shudder? The damn car seemed to be in two dimensions when it shuddered bad, you could not even see it clearly as it was in more than one place at the same time. Shudder broke main frame elements more than once on those cars. My little brother, driving, said the whole universe disappeared when it happened. How I knew, as well as working with twin clutch disc tech we used on our AMC race cars too. Just as we could not back then, there is no computer on earth that can actively predict what the next application of a dry clutch should be like. Only God knows that. Yet Ford had the temerity to decide it could take TWO of them to predict what each would do in relation to the other, or double the self bullsh-t. Those engineers should have known better, it's not rocket science.

Getting too invested in things to stop? I was around to see the results of the investigation over the Pinto fiasco, the DCT is not Ford's first time being at that table. Corporate memory is among the shortest of the short when it comes to trying for the 'easy' money. Look up the 'famous' (infamous there) Lee Iacocca's 'rule of 2000' as it applied to that car and another case of internal engineers telling higher heads the car could not be produced as claimed only to be told to ****. The lawyers tore Ford a new one over those internal messages. It even lead to Ford being the first company to ever assign X number of $$$$ based on every human life lost in the cars as a way to judge and control the losses there. Somewhere around $96,000 or so at the time IIRC. So they have a plan for getting out rather than fixing the issue. ALWAYS. One should give thought to the fact that Ford is suddenly dropping making cars NOW of all times and who will get shafted based on that one? A hint...............the later years supply of car parts will disappear way before the normal unspoken '10 year rule' most car parts are made for and that is getting stretched now anyway, more like 7 now. The same happened to Pintos in an effort to remove as many as they could from human memory (and potential liability, even while still claiming they were safe!) as fast as possible, I had the last year Pinto ('80) and couldn't get parts 3 years after it was made and Ford pressed hard on the aftermarket to dry their Pinto parts up too. I ended up buying parts for MII, as many of them were the same and available for many years after the Pinto parts were gone. That of course does not bode well for you buyers of the last couple years DCT, at some point you may still be in warranty yet get told there are no longer any parts to fix it with. If I were you I'd expect it.
 

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Many of you missed the cardinal rule of new car buying, which is to NEVER buy the first year of any new model and even more if it spouts new tech of any kind.
I mean, where do you draw the line? I bought a 2014; that's the third year of production. Did I break the cardinal rule?

I did my due diligence before I bought it; there were certainly some reports of transmission issues back then, but the overwhelming majority of information back then was geared toward how best to drive it. By then there was talk of a different clutch pack revision and folks claiming their cars were "fixed" by the new pack.

In any case, complaints were not known to be widespread (let's the be honest, it's only a small subset of folks experiencing issues who have the wherewithal - be it time or knowledge - to get on a forum and bitch about the transmission from a technical perspective). Hindsight is 20/20 and it's obvious now that the early reports were in fact representative of a larger group, but that was nearly impossible to judge back in 2014.

I'd almost say that the folks buying MK3.5 cars should have known better, but it's kind of the same argument. If they even had the foresight to read up on the DPS6 (let's be honest, that's not your average consumer), they see "refreshed" MK3 with the "fixed" hardware and plenty of people saying their MK3.5 drives just fine (of course, that's because it's new).

I don't actually disagree with you, but you can only blame the victim so much. Everything is so much more obvious looking back; just because you and a few select others said the DPS6 was a bad idea from the beginning doesn't mean it was that obvious to everyone else. There are a billion people on the internet with their own opinions and you could easily been on of those opinions that was wrong.
 

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I bought the second year, 2013 & assumed any issues were worked out. When you drive around the block & back with a salesperson you aren’t really getting a good feel for how the car is driving. There are some distractions & having someone with you is annoying. Hindsight is 20/20 but knowing what I know now I would’ve just bought the ST, oh well...... I could certainly do that now but it’s gonna cost me a lot of money.



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I look at everything in post #102 as being the difference in being an optimist and where I come from, or pessimistic to a fault. When one minimizes the issues by looking at how few people have said anything it shows a lack of knowledge about human kind and behavior in general and here on the subject in particular. Most people being of an optimistic viewpoint wait way too long to suspect what should have been suspected right at the start. Then rather than help their fellow beings quicker they have to deal first with 'should I let others know I got taken by these people?'. Heck, they have to get past believing it themselves.

Dunno where people were researching, I knew there were problems in '14, there were enough reports by then. Ford blamed it at first on the seal, but seals have been bulletproof for 70 years now, suggesting either incompetent design or something else wrong. Or both, pessimists go there fast. It's a common corporate thing if you look for it.

I left Ford cars after 40 years for other closely aligned issues and went to Nissan, and within 6 months easily came to the conclusion looking at the complaints that they have a very similar issue with their version of CVT transmission. The transmissions are literally junk in any car they have them in and for years now. I bought a standard type 4 speed ATX and no trouble with that one.
 

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I bought a 2012 in 2017 knowing about the issues but the car only had 70K miles and was the right price for my needs.

Last week at 96K miles my son got a Trans malfunction warning light and the transmission was shifting erratically. It was throwing some clutch indexing codes.

I took it to my local dealership and was informed my car was not covered for the clutch issue because it was at 7 yrs and 7 months since sold. I called Ford customer care, opened a case requesting an exception to the 7 yr limit and within 24 hours got a call back that they would cover the issue.

Got the car back today after a week where they applied both 14M01 and 14M02 fixes as well as the door latch and fuel tank recalls. No Charge!

I fully appreciate the pain of the horror stories I have read from early adopters before the settlement. I too was concerned having read the supposed edict from Ford corporate about reducing costs related to the issue but Ford stepped up for me when they could have clearly told me to bad so sad and honored the repair at their cost.

Lesson learned is to reach out and challenge a denial at the dealership. The process was far less painful then shelling out $2400!

Only time will tell if I continue to experience issues as many had with early remediation's. I am hoping that the new seals and clutch as well as the latest programming will last me the life of this car.
 

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It's a Ford. I switched from G.M. (real garbage) to Ford in 1993 and learned that no matter what they make, its going to have issues. The A4LD in my 1993 Aerostar had a bad reputation but lasted me over 200K miles before the OD band burned up. The AOD in my 1990 Mustang 5.0 was a leaking turd and I had to do the 1-3-1 shuffle before I rebuilt it with Lentech parts and VB. Each of my 3 Lincoln Mark VIII's had to have the accumulator pistons and springs replaced due to a defective design. Pulling a Mark VIII dash for a broken blend door actuator by 60K miles was a PITA. Having to take the gear from a Lincoln LS actuator to put into the old 1st gen actuator because it was discontinued added to the fun. Ball joints and sway bar end links were low mile regular replacement items. The Chinese MT82 in my current Coyote Mustang was crap in stock form (Plastic shift fork pads anyone?) but livable behind its current 700 HP powerplant due to mods. It will be going to a Revolution auto rebuild soon. Ford decided it would be wise to use a powdered metal Oil Pump gear from the old lower powered modular engines which necessitated an ATI balancer during my Paxton Novi build, I am not replacing the gear until I build a new forged short block.
As noted by others, other brands are not immune. A cross contamination issue on Nissan's 5 speed auto led to me to seek out a 6speed manual when I bought my then new Nissan Frontier. My wife's Nissan Rogue spent 4 1/2 months in the shop due to a back order of CVT coolers from Japan that were needed to make the cars safe on the road. Audi, Mercedes and others have had their share of problems.
I knew what I was getting into when I purchased the Titanium and my SEL. The cars were over 1/3rd off sticker and dirt cheap, the extended warranties gave me the peace of mind not to worry about it. My 17 SEL has a 125000 mile warranty and sits at 62000. When it gets near that warranty mileage mark I will dump it and go with another cheap new daily.
 

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I bought a 2012 in 2017 knowing about the issues but the car only had 70K miles and was the right price for my needs.

Last week at 96K miles my son got a Trans malfunction warning light and the transmission was shifting erratically. It was throwing some clutch indexing codes.

I took it to my local dealership and was informed my car was not covered for the clutch issue because it was at 7 yrs and 7 months since sold. I called Ford customer care, opened a case requesting an exception to the 7 yr limit and within 24 hours got a call back that they would cover the issue.

Got the car back today after a week where they applied both 14M01 and 14M02 fixes as well as the door latch and fuel tank recalls. No Charge!

I fully appreciate the pain of the horror stories I have read from early adopters before the settlement. I too was concerned having read the supposed edict from Ford corporate about reducing costs related to the issue but Ford stepped up for me when they could have clearly told me to bad so sad and honored the repair at their cost.

Lesson learned is to reach out and challenge a denial at the dealership. The process was far less painful then shelling out $2400!

Only time will tell if I continue to experience issues as many had with early remediation's. I am hoping that the new seals and clutch as well as the latest programming will last me the life of this car.
I think if you could post any details about the process you went through, eg: phone numbers, your approach to Ford, the name of the dealership in Austin, for anyone in that area, and any other tips that would be helpful. You've done very well considering a lot of folks couldn't get a free repair during the 12 to 19th July 'open season', according to the Detroit Free Press latest article. Doesn't matter to me, we had ours done at 55k on warranty, but kudos to you for getting a freebie. Just curious.....did you use an approach that focused on safety.....or lack of I should say. It seems like a very hit and miss process at the moment with most folks reporting a miss, ie: they have to pay.
 

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The luck of the draw, and presentation is likely everything. I think most of the dealers will give in to certain people knowing they cannot do it to all, it lets them sleep better at night since they can say they fixed some of them.
 

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Sorry to hear that man, I’d throw up if I had to pay them 5k. How many miles are on it?



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It has 125,000. The dealership told me that the trans is kaput. It was fine, and then suddenly the check engine light came on and it stopped working. I am going to tow it to a different dealership for a second opinion.
 

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I think if you could post any details about the process you went through, eg: phone numbers, your approach to Ford, the name of the dealership in Austin, for anyone in that area, and any other tips that would be helpful. You've done very well considering a lot of folks couldn't get a free repair during the 12 to 19th July 'open season', according to the Detroit Free Press latest article. Doesn't matter to me, we had ours done at 55k on warranty, but kudos to you for getting a freebie. Just curious.....did you use an approach that focused on safety.....or lack of I should say. It seems like a very hit and miss process at the moment with most folks reporting a miss, ie: they have to pay.
The dealership was Covert Ford off of Hwy 183. I brought the vehicle in knowing my service start date was 7 months past the 7 years for the 14M01 leaking seal issue and having run the FORSCAN tool knew I had clutch issues. Visual inspection revealed oil seeping from between the bell housing and trany.

Initially the service advisor said I was covered for both issues but as soon as I walked back into the house after a trip home using the courtesy car he called me and confirmed the leaking seal issue but also that I was outside coverage by 7 months. I asked if there was anyone I could escalate to and it rattled off the customer care number, told me to ask for a case to be created and then let him know the case number as soon as I had it, 1-866-631-3788.

Folks at the Ford customer care hotline were nice. The case I presented was simple, I am a loyal ford owner, 2010 F150, 2012 Ford Focus and 2019 Lincoln Nautilus. I understand my Ford focus is 7 months past the year year window but under the 100K mile limit for a know quality defect and request an exception to allow the repair to be covered under the existing Customer Satisfaction Program. The agent created a case, gave me the number and advised me I would be contacted within 24 hours. This was at 9AM CST.

The following morning at 8AM CST. Victoria with Ford called me stating she had been assigned to my case. I spent 20 seconds repeating by calmly repeating my case from the day before and she immediately replied that Ford thanked me for my loyalty and that they would cover the repair. and it seemed as if she had already made up her mind before she called me as there was zero back and forth/ begging required. I called the dealership and they advised me they had already ordered the parts and it would be done the following day. it of course took 2 days longer as the car was also due the door latch and fuel cell recalls but I was not going to complain.
 
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