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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Chilton book says:
  • The sensor is located on the front left hand side of the engine on 2.0L Zetec.
  • Unscrew the mounting bolt and withdraw the sensor. If a spacer is present between the sensor and engine, it is vital that this is replaced when replacing the sensor, or the sensor head will hit the rotor teeth.
  • Installation is a reversal of removal.
Sounds simple enough for a 2001 Zetec. Maybe it's more complicated on later models, as some video guides suggest.

Why replace? I get an occasional long crank. Maybe 1 out of 30 or 40. LIkely causes:

Fuel pump. No. It's new, same symptom before and after.
EGR system parts. No. Recently replaced them all. Still happens.
IACV. Maybe, but that job is too hard without a lift, I will leave it for last.
Crankshaft position sensor. Seems likely, according to my research.

It's cheaper to replace than test. At 20 years of age, it's time. Anyone experience complications doing this job?
 

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The connector is often carbonized from cat heat to maybe fall apart when you remove it. I had to mod both of mine. Very low volt part so the connector has to grip well at the pins.

The actual housing the part slides into is the spacer, the engine has to separate from the trans to change it as the spacer part goes in from the inside and flywheel stops you from getting to it.

At 30-40 cranks the sensor is likely good, they show codes fairly quick if not. Something about spout or ignition pips insufficient over the first 1000 rpm.

The spacer sets the read depth, it's not complicated like the later engines can be where you have to set the sensor yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
occasional long crank ... LIkely causes
Or possibly O2 sensors. I wondered about expected life and found this:

As a rule, the service life of oxygen sensors in most 1996 and newer vehicles with OBD II should be 100,000 to 150,000 miles or more — assuming no problems that could cause the O2 sensors to fail prematurely. On pre-1996 vintage vehicles, the oxygen sensors were not as robust, and typically had a service life of 50,000 to 80,000 miles

www.counterman.com/technical-forum-when-should-an-oxygen-sensor-be-replaced/

With no CEL, I think mine are still good at 167k miles.

Sometimes when hitting WOT, I feel a two stage RPM increase. The first stage passes quickly, then a faster and louder second stage kicks in. But lately it's all one smooth stage, without any double jump. Maybe it took a week or so for the computer to learn the new EGR parts, and now it's preferring emissions and fuel economy over performance. If so, maybe the occasional long crank will go away on its own. We'll see.
 

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EGR goes 100% off at WOT, just so you know. It better anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I had the car on ramps to change oil, and looked at the crankshaft position sensor. I found a torx 30 bolt in a tight spot behind the sensor, hard to reach. I have a torx 30 bit that fits in a screwdriver handle, but that will never work in the confined space. I'll have to buy a torx 30 socket bit and see if that fits with a ratchet. Maybe I'll put this job off for a while.
 

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You do realize that that same bit will fit in a 1/4 inch socket, and that that set-up will probably be no bigger than a torx socket? Or don't you have a 1/4 inch socket either?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My T30 bit fits a 5/16 socket. I'll see if it works when I get the car back on ramps. If it's too big, a torx wrench would be my next guess.
 
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