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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2001 ford focus 2.0L SOHC engine. I have had to the engine rebuilt and since have put nearly 5500 miles on it. just recently I have ran into the problem where the car will randomly not start. Just a crank, no start situation. it has happened 4 times and would eventually start, and now after parking it at my apartment it has happened for the 5th time. unlike the first 4 times no it will not start period. I have replaced the fuel filter, the fuel pump, and the ignition coil. the starter and alternator are only 3 months old but seeing as that I have a crank no start issue those cannot be the problem. I saw a tip on youtube and tried it. the tip was to unplug the top of the fuel filter, crank the car and see if fuel squirts out. but none did at all. I can tell the engine isn't getting any fuel. I disconnected the battery and allowed it to set to see if it will reset, upon reconnecting it, it would still just crank but wont start. but I hooked up a diagnostic tool and got a code P0193 even though the engine has not been through a drive cycle. I tried a different fuel pressure regulator and still the same thing. im losing my mind over here. help anyone
 

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Fuses & resetting or even temporarily bypassing the fuel pump safety cutoff switch would be good first checks for no fuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I checked all the fuses and changed all the relays. how exactly do I go about bypassing the fuel shut off switch?
 

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Try pressing the reset button first.

To bypass you'd need to remove the kick panel for access, then pull the connector & jump it.

AFAIK it's just a double wire connection there that needs continuity, nothing complex.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
so by jumping do you mean to simply use a wire or something and manually connect the positive to the positive or does it matter which terminal I use?
 

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Yup, that's the idea.

You can test the cutoff switch with a meter, but since that doesn't PROVE it'll carry a load the bypass jumper is a temp. test to rule out a problem there. (or prove one if it solves the issue)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ok I understand now. so if the car will crank once I jump the connectors it should be an indicator that I just needed a new inertia switch. but if it does not crank what does that mean?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
after jumping the inertia switch the car still wouldn't crank. it is clearly starved for fuel. I hooked up a multimeter to the inertia switch connector. turned the key and it read 00.0 volts across even after switching the prongs to opposite terminals. what next?
 

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Bear with me here, it's a bit of a technical explanation. I'm a bit new to the workings of Ford's ECU, but have a ton of experience with Chrysler products.

Check out the crankshaft position sensor. This sounds very similar to an issue I had with my Sebring, where it would randomly not start, or would run for a while and then just stop with no code. In my case, the ECU would suspend spark and fuel pump operation (after the initial burst on power-on) until it saw input from the crankshaft position sensor. This sensor will usually not generate a code if it dies since it simply cycles on and off as small gaps and teeth on the flywheel go past the magnetic end of the sensor, triggering the on/off output of the sensor. The placement of the teeth read by this sensor tell the ECU where the flywheel is in it's 360 degree rotation. If the ECU sees no voltage, it simply assumes the engine is in a position where the sensor would not deliver voltage (a normal part of operation while running). It's worth mentioning, there is also a camshaft position sensor that does the same thing, tells the ECU that the cam is turning and where it is. Either sensor could be the issue.

I believe that you need a scope to test either because you will just get quick "blips" of voltage as a tooth goes past the sensor when the engine is turning over. They can be a bugger to get out though, as the engine likes to corrode around the hole that the plastic sensor fits in to, holding it in place. My Sebring's sensor needed to be drilled out, so it was destroyed in the process.

It sounds like you have the fuel side pretty well covered, but have you tried the fuel filter test you did above with someone cycling the key on and off? Many cars will run the fuel pump only for a second when the key is first turned on, and then not run it more until they see the engine turning. After that, I'd check spark. No spark and a fuel pump that only does the initial power-on burst would tell me the ECU does not see the engine turning.
 

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You can use a simple voltmeter on these to determine the blips off the crank or cam sensor if they have only two wires to them. Simple magnetic proximity sensors. Hall effect type sensors (3 wire) are a bit harder.

Yes, the fuel pump should be heard for like a 2 second spinup every time key is cycled to on. Sound is under the rear seat cushion. There is a relay and fuse to check if no power to the inertia switch. Make SURE you have checke3d correct relay/fuse, many do not. If sure then you need to start testing for power in the wires to those relay/fuse, the parts being good are worthless without power to them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bear with me here, it's a bit of a technical explanation. I'm a bit new to the workings of Ford's ECU, but have a ton of experience with Chrysler products.

Check out the crankshaft position sensor. This sounds very similar to an issue I had with my Sebring, where it would randomly not start, or would run for a while and then just stop with no code. In my case, the ECU would suspend spark and fuel pump operation (after the initial burst on power-on) until it saw input from the crankshaft position sensor. This sensor will usually not generate a code if it dies since it simply cycles on and off as small gaps and teeth on the flywheel go past the magnetic end of the sensor, triggering the on/off output of the sensor. The placement of the teeth read by this sensor tell the ECU where the flywheel is in it's 360 degree rotation. If the ECU sees no voltage, it simply assumes the engine is in a position where the sensor would not deliver voltage (a normal part of operation while running). It's worth mentioning, there is also a camshaft position sensor that does the same thing, tells the ECU that the cam is turning and where it is. Either sensor could be the issue.

I believe that you need a scope to test either because you will just get quick "blips" of voltage as a tooth goes past the sensor when the engine is turning over. They can be a bugger to get out though, as the engine likes to corrode around the hole that the plastic sensor fits in to, holding it in place. My Sebring's sensor needed to be drilled out, so it was destroyed in the process.

It sounds like you have the fuel side pretty well covered, but have you tried the fuel filter test you did above with someone cycling the key on and off? Many cars will run the fuel pump only for a second when the key is first turned on, and then not run it more until they see the engine turning. After that, I'd check spark. No spark and a fuel pump that only does the initial power-on burst would tell me the ECU does not see the engine turning.
It has spark at all wires and the pump runs when the key is cycled on. error code p0193 shows up but come to find out this car has 2 fuel pressure sensors. one on the tank and one on the fuel rail. I swapped out the one on the fuel rail and still no crank so does that mean the one on the tank is bad? could it still be the crankshaft sensor even if I am getting spark?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I am not sure but I believe I have gotten a little bit closer to a final conclusion. as of now fuel is not even reaching the fuel filter.... what could cause that? the pump and filter are new
 

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Just throwing out ideas here: Plugged or collapsed fuel line, clog at the pickup, or maybe the pump got installed in such a way that the fuel is not at the pickup? Maybe the tank is actually empty and the gauge/sending unit for the gauge is stuck, showing higher than actual fuel levels.

All are things I've seen happen over the years. Another guess is a fuel leak, but you can usually smell or see that pretty easily.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
How would I check for a clogged or plugged fuel line? do I just compressed air or do I disconnect it and blow into it?
 

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How would I check for a clogged or plugged fuel line? do I just compressed air or do I disconnect it and blow into it?
You're on the right track, but I think a visual inspection is in order first. Lift the car and visually follow the line, checking for any obvious kinks or whatever. If it looks good, I would start at the fuel tank. Most cars have a rubber hose that connects the fuel pump outlet to the steel fuel line. Check these for kinks or bends, then remove the fuel hoses from the pump and fuel line and check that they are clear. Then, have someone hit the key, and verify the pump actually moves fuel and that it comes out of the pump outlet. If fuel comes out at the pump outlet, we have confirmed the issue is the fuel line somewhere. If not, it sounds like a pump or pump wiring issue (I don't remember if you said you hear the fuel pump when the key is turned on, that would eliminate a wiring issue). After the pump and hose, it's literally just a steel tube that runs from the tank area to the fuel filter, so no magic here.

You could probably use compressed air to clear it out, it would probably be easier to get air in the line with the fuel hose (by the tank) back on and tightened down after you verify it is clear. I'd keep the fuel filter unhooked when doing this to keep whatever you get out from going into the brand new filter and take appropriate precautions in case there is fuel in the line that gets pushed out by the compressed air. If you end up breaking a line with the compressed air, it's usually pretty cheap to replace in most cases, just a pain bending the line and fishing it through sometimes.

Maybe someone else can confirm because I haven't actually looked at the tank on my Focus, but do these cars have a return line or a returnless pump? It's possible that the lines were swapped when reinstalling the pump if there is a return and send line at the tank.
 

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No return line. If filter installed backwards no fuel if the filter is one with a check valve in it, some yes, others no. There is no fuel pressure sensor in the tank, that one is for vapor/emission only and has nothing to do with your fuel pressure. You can only blow forward with air pressure as there are check valves in the pump and module that will not pass backwards.

Did you change just pump only or entire pump module?? Pump only is a mistake of the highest order. The only pump available is the second design and it does NOT work with first design modules like '01 has.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I changed the pump and filter only. And after a careful visual inspection I noticed that what I believe is the ground wire to the on the module is burned through. I mean burnt through the plastic.

but I did swap out the wiring harness once I had the tank down and upon giving it power the fuel pump shot fuel through. so I found my problem. but when I reattached everything it no longer pumped through as in indication that I have to replace the entire assembly. but seeing as that I have the one that locks into the tank versus the one with the 2 metal rods its much harder to find seeing as that just with the SOHC engine, ford did not make that assembly a common on.

can I put a new tank on with the more commonly found assembly or does the computer only recognize the one it rolled off the lot with?
 

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I'm not sure I understand. So the pump pumps when power is applied directly, but does not pump when powered through the wiring in the car? Or do you mean that fuel comes out at the pump, but not at the filter once the pump is hooked back up to the fuel line?

Not sure about your other question.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I'm not sure I understand. So the pump pumps when power is applied directly, but does not pump when powered through the wiring in the car? Or do you mean that fuel comes out at the pump, but not at the filter once the pump is hooked back up to the fuel line?

Not sure about your other question.
The pump will pump out fuel when I attach a different wiring harness to the assembly when it is outside of the tank. so in other words I used the assembly wiring harness from a separate assembly unit and connected it to my pump.

now my old wiring harness had a burned wire and the metal prong on the unit is not secure. so when I hooked up the other it pumped fuel through. that is when it was out of the tank on the ground and the harness leading from the car was straight and not coiled up.

but when I put the tank back on the car and bolt everything in place the pump will not run anymore. so it leads me to believe that I have to replace the entire unit.

but that is an expensive buy from ford at a price of 495
 
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