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I will and always will recommend using coolant that is compatible.
The chemistry between coolants can be dramatic. Yes the pressure cap adds most of your boil over protection but antifreeze does add some.

I know a few chemical engineers they are far from stupid.

They weren't using too many aluminum blocks in the 60s, and I'm pretty sure they didn't have graphite blocks/cylinder heads.

Your car your choice but I will never recommend universal anything to anybody.



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Discussion Starter #22
I sold thousands of gallons of O'Reilly 'mix with all brands and types' coolant and not one problem ever.

Coolant adds greatly to the low temp the water can go but virtually NOTHING to boilover temps, it is the pressure cap that does most of that. Coolant only increases boilover protection maybe 5 degrees which is nothing. Except to the makers, then they can advertise it increases boilover protection legally, most of which is a lie and they know it.

Different engine materials? The vast majority are the same ones used in the early '60s, a few plastics have changed.

The problem of incompatible coolants was solved long ago and it was Delco GM orange that gave the problems. It has been changed several times since then and the coolant didn't even have to be mixed with others; it messed up by itself. Certain plastic parts failed using it. No longer a problem. The myths die hard though.
Well thank you for your help. Also does it matter if it’s distilled or tap? I didn’t think about that before I mixed it with my sink water
 

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If the water is not excessively hard no problem. I have used tap for almost 50 years now and we did the same at the family garage. No problems ever in so many cars I can't count.

To other, run the pressure boiling points of water at different temps and find out the coolant doesn't hardly help there, I don't car what engineer says so. Remember too those same engineers gave us OAT long life coolants that take 6 MONTHS to develop full rust protection and why you find rust in new systems. I quit using it myself when the cars kept coloring the plastic reservoirs up purple with rust. Went back to oldschool one year (I use it for up to 4 years) and problem completely disappeared on 2 cars. Oldschool formula protects instantly. And lasts almost as long, the engineers of course will not tell you that.

Graphite blocks? There is a small amount of graphite in ALL cast iron and forever. Best friend and I had an ALL aluminum V-8 Olds made in '63 and the AMC engines I ran used aluminum timing cases all through the later '60s. They were very susceptible to straight water in the cooling system, it would quickly flaw a thin casting point that would then leak water into the oil.

Universal? If not buying Motorcraft oil you are using universal. And I don't spend with somebody telling me it's synthetic blend without him telling me exactly HOW MUCH is. A scam.
 

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I understand pressure increases the boiling point of water most people do. Antifreeze can give you a small buffer if the pressure cap fails. Distilled water is dirt cheap basically free. Unless someone has done a water test they have no clue what the pH of the water they have coming out of the tap, nor do they know the hardness level.

Ethylene glycol has a boiling point of 386°. Having a 50-50 mixture some cars even having a 60-40 mixture from the factory is going to increase your boiling point over 212.


Some people believe the Earth is flat, and some people believe Folgers is actually coffee.






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Discussion Starter #26
If the water is not excessively hard no problem. I have used tap for almost 50 years now and we did the same at the family garage.

To other, run the pressure boiling points of water at different temps and find out the coolant doesn't hardly help there, I don't car what engineer says so. Remember too those same engineers gave us OAT long life coolants that take 6 MONTHS to develop full rust protection and why you find rust in new systems. I quit using it myself when the cars kept coloring the plastic reservoirs up purple with rust. Went back to oldschool one year (I use it for up to 4 years) and problem completely disappeared on 2 cars. Oldschool formula protects instantly. And lasts almost as long, the engineers of course will not tell you that.

Graphite blocks? There is a small amount of graphite in ALL cast iron and forever. Best friend and I had an ALL aluminum V-8 Olds made in '63 and the AMC engines I ran used aluminum timing cases all through the later '60s. They were very susceptible to straight water in the cooling system, it would quickly flaw a thin casting point that would then leak water into the oil.

Universal? If not buying Motorcraft oil you are using universal. And I don't spend with somebody telling me it's synthetic blend without him telling me exactly HOW MUCH is. A scam.
Okay so I understood the first part.
I don’t know what the next two paragraphs mean. Not a car person lol
It’s O’Reillys universal coolant.
 

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Also does it matter if it’s distilled or tap? I didn’t think about that before I mixed it with my sink water
Coolant is sold two ways. Pre mixed with water, or full strength. You don't add water to the pre mixed. The factory already did that for you. They make more money selling it that way. The full strength is 100% coolant. You add water to make a 50/50 mix.

The label should say which you have. Then you know whether to add water, or not.

If you added water to pre mixed, you watered it down too much. But even then, if it's just for topping off, don't worry about it, unless you live in a very cold climate.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Coolant is sold two ways. Pre mixed with water, or full strength. You don't add water to the pre mixed. The factory already did that for you. They make more money selling it that way. The full strength is 100% coolant. You add water to make a 50/50 mix.

The label should say which you have. Then you know whether to add water, or not.

If you added water to pre mixed, you watered it down too much. But even then, if it's just for topping off, don't worry about it, unless you live in a very cold climate.
I bought full strength so I had to dilute it. But thank you for the info. I’ll keep that in mind in case I misread bottles which I also tend to do lol
 

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Coolant usually brags about protecting from boilover up to 265 degrees, look at their ads, any of them. Put a 14.7 atmospheric pressure with a cap pressure of 18 psi and you get within 7 degrees of that with zero coolant in the water. Why I gave the link. Go to 20 psi cap and you are within 5 degrees.

'Unless someone has done a water test they have no clue what the pH of the water they have coming out of the tap, nor do they know the hardness level.'

You don't need any testing for that, simply look at (watch) your water outlets at tub or sink, if hard water you will have scale buildup on them at the exit where the water drop continually dries up. Not rocket science. Simply using your eyes. Or ask any plumber you know that works local.

FYI, I buy straight coolant only, too much chance of them cutting the other with too much water when the profits get tight. I'm now suspecting the 70/30 alcohol provided in a covid world of doing the same, I'd swear the amount of water has increased in it based on the way it is acting now. When I used to run printing presses you always found them diluting the alcohol, which was supposed to be 100%, it wasn't and neither were the fountain solution concentrates, the makers were always thinning them out for more money. You accused them of it, the routine denial but suddenly your next batches were back right like they needed to be. American business doing what it does.
 

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As often happens here, this thread is spinning out of control. Hope you got what you needed from it.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Coolant usually brags about protecting from boilover up to 265 degrees, look at their ads, ANY of them. Put a 14.7 atmospheric pressure with a cap pressure of 18 psi and you get within 7 degrees of that with zero coolant in the water. Why I gave the link.
Oooooooooo ok. Do cars get that kind of hot?
 

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Buying full-strength antifreeze is, IMHO, the only way to go. When you do a flush-and-fill procedure you never know how much water is left in the system. In some cars it is very little while other cars have a lot of water that does not drain out. I have always done that since my first car in the '60s...long before 50/50 mix was being sold in stores.
The most accurate way to achieve the 50/50 ratio (which is recommended in most parts of the U.S. ...severely cold regions being different) is to look up the total coolant capacity of the system in the owner manual. Pour in 1/2 of the system capacity using full-strength and then top off with water as necessary. In the last few years I have started to use distilled water just to be on the safe side because of the exotic materials used in today's cars. It is cheap enough and eliminates any worries.
 

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Or, go the easy route - do a simple drain/fill with a gallon of Motorcraft pre-diluted coolant. Repeat at some point later. It won't get all of the old coolant out, but it will get enough. No need to flush the system and no need to bother with getting the water/coolant mix correct.
 

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I don't categorically rule out OEM brands. But I shop around, read reviews, and try to make an informed choice regarding price vs. quality. For my money, OEM brands rarely win.
 

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That assumes of course that the mix was correct to begin with. Some people in a hurry add straight water for a low coolant level say in summer and never come back and adjust it correctly, making that a risk. If you begin to overheat and find it low do you drive it beginning to overheat to find proper coolant? No, you put the first water in car you can find, it can save your engine. Why the below is the way to go for me too.....

'Buying full-strength antifreeze is, IMHO, the only way to go.'

Check your coolant in bottle with a freeze protection % tool, you will sometimes get a surprise, and almost always it will be too much water in pre-mix.

You are also paying them $5 or close a pre-mix bottle to simply mix water with it, WAY too high. Throwiing away money. Save a bottle and then split the straight equal in the two and add water. $10 or close for 5 minutes work, that's $120/hr. paid work. You can always give it to them of course, I won't. I usually use the one gallon right then and save the other for adding during the year to any of 3 cars.

To OP...........normal engine temps are from 200-230 degrees usually, they are considered overheating and in engine damage territory at the 265 degree F number.

Sorry we overwhelmed you there but lack of attention to detail can kill you there. Why the threads often meander around, too many people want to help but no longer than for a few seconds, it may take longer than that to save mistakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Buying full-strength antifreeze is, IMHO, the only way to go. When you do a flush-and-fill procedure you never know how much water is left in the system. In some cars it is very little while other cars have a lot of water that does not drain out. I have always done that since my first car in the '60s...long before 50/50 mix was being sold in stores.
The most accurate way to achieve the 50/50 ratio (which is recommended in most parts of the U.S. ...severely cold regions being different) is to look up the total coolant capacity of the system in the owner manual. Pour in 1/2 of the system capacity using full-strength and then top off with water as necessary. In the last few years I have started to use distilled water just to be on the safe side because of the exotic materials used in today's cars. It is cheap enough and eliminates any worries.
Thanks! But I just used a bottle with measurements on it to help me out with correctly measuring it. I didn’t want to take any chances
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Or, go the easy route - do a simple drain/fill with a gallon of Motorcraft pre-diluted coolant. Repeat at some point later. It won't get all of the old coolant out, but it will get enough. No need to flush the system and no need to bother with getting the water/coolant mix correct.
Maybe that’s the easy route for you but ya girl has no idea how to do that lol
 
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