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I have the cold weather pkge and am wondering how much electricity is needed for it to run. If it's on the car, I'm going to use it. I was going to plug it in an outdoor receptacle near my garage door. How warm does it keep the motor? Thanks in advance.
 

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on thin air
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I have the cold weather pkge and am wondering how much electricity is needed for it to run. If it's on the car, I'm going to use it. I was going to plug it in an outdoor receptacle near my garage door. How warm does it keep the motor? Thanks in advance.
If it's anything like my old SVT set up, you'll be fine plugging it in with a contractor extention cord in said outlet. You'll likely start your car and the water temp will be about halfway to running temp....enough to not blow freezing cold air and start warming the interior.

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

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Focus Hoarder
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i run a winter grade extention cord into my garage to a outlet thats for the block heaters to a GFI thats controlled by the out door temp so it wont turn on (unless bypassed) until its cold enough and i if i were to take a guess its maybe a buck a night..

for my car the temp gauge is a smidge under 1/4 up the temp gauge
 

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So mote be it
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Just don't forget to unplug before driving away....
[hihi] I could imagine groggy mornings leaving behind schedule and driving off.

I havent seen one of these in person, does it come out from the hood or through the grill? If the hood, does the hood still close with it plugged in?

I've never looked but i am going to assume the ST I bought from KY wouldnt have had this added from the factory. The block heater and appropriate wiring would be noticeable, correct?
 

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Old Phart
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They usually get mounted where you can let them dangle out the hood or through the grill in the Winter & tuck them back in for the Summer.

Depends on the installer how well that is done though, not fully factory installed even when they come with the car in most cases (cord usually packed separately).
 

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The engine heater heat the oil in the sump.
Heater can range from 35 watts for a dip stick type, to 6amps and 1,000 watts for a pickup truck heater.
Here is a quote from Googling:
how many watts is the average car engine heater?
Quote:
""The average cost to operate a 110 volt device overnight for ten hours when needed is $90 per year as of 2014, assuming an electrical rate of $0.11143/kWh. Wisconsin Public Service recommends installing a timer that starts the heater approximately two hours before the driver intends to start the vehicle, which reduces the cost by $70 or more annually at this rate, depending on the size of the heater.""

The idea of a timer makes LOT of sense.. Especially if you forget and leave the heater on all weekend!
 

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Old Phart
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The stock/accessory type sold by Ford for these is the 'block heater' style, it replaces a freeze plug and sticks a heating element right into the water jacket of the block.

This is the most effective style that's common, a second that also works well is the 'tank type' that goes in heater hose and optimally draws it's cold water from a block drain - resulting in decent circulation of warmed coolant.

The dipstick type has a relatively minimal effect, there are other oil heaters that magnet mount to a steel oil pan (where used).

Other Winter heaters include a battery wrap heater, or the home made systems that can be as simple as a light bulb (old incandescent) under a blanket over the engine.

IMHO the engine heaters that warm coolant are the most important first step, and all that's usually needed. Battery warmers could be a second step, in areas with severe cold common.
 
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