Focus Fanatics Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What would happen if you only clay barred your car without putting any polish or wax?

What does the paint look like after clay barring?

Is it ok to use a buffer to apply the wax and take it off?

Sorry for asking but all I've ever done was wax by hand after washing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,805 Posts
Use a bucket of water and dish soap to strip all the wax off the car.
then clay bar the car.

clay bar removes all impurities, and microscopic specs of dirt and lifts it from the paint. Work on one section at a time. A whole section like a hood or door, should take about 5-10 minutes. So the whole car should be done in about 45 minutes.

Remember to always work the clay around, Folding it and mushing it. So the dirt particles go to the center of the clay, and not pushed against the body of the car.

When done, the car should resemble the look and feel of the paint, the Day you bought the car from the dealer. The paint should be super smoothe to the touch. (obviously, damage, nicks, scratches, etc will still be there if they were before)

then Proceed to wax the car for ultimate shine and protection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,065 Posts
The paint looks clean, shiny, smooth and feels soft (if you can say that about hard metal panels) after clay. But not quite as soft as after it has wax on it.

It's not dangerous perse, to leave the car after claying, but be aware that the paint is essentially naked. It's clearcoat cleaned to the gills and then left exposed to the air/bugs etc. So it's sorta like running around with a car who's wax has worn off over time, except it's super clean at the moment.

So it's recommended to polish and wax, or at least just wax after claying. Because you've just essentially made the paint surface optimally prepared to accept it's next treatment- polish or wax.

I always do wax by hand, if/when I ever get a buffer, I'll use it for polish only. I do think it's ok to wax by buffer, but I'm not positive. You may find it's actually easier to apply the wax, if you've never clayed a car before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
You actually have to use dish detergent first? I don't think I'd ever want to try it!! I'd rather have swirl marks than really ugly paint because I relied on aftermarket wax but I could be wrong.

Would anyone know if it's ok to use a buffer to apply and take off the wax?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
398 Posts
I'll clear a few things up here...

For starters, to answer your question about claying: Clay bars remove phyiscal objects that have become somewhat infused into the finish of the car. These "things" are not removed with typical washing or waxing. It is usually s combination of metal shavings/rust, rail dust from transport, sometimes bird crap, pollen, and fallout. The claybar grabs these things OFF of the surface, without actually changing the surface of the paint itself.

A claybar will NOT change the "look" of the paint in the sense that it will have any harsh or compounding effects. It just helps to get unwanted contamination off.

Secondly, the KEY to claybarring a vehicle is a VERY thoroughly wash and rinse before claying. Then, be sure to work in a cool place in the shade, and use a LOT of lubrication. I like to use a spray bottle filled with very warm water and soap. works great.

the idea of washing it with dish soap may sound crazy, but there is logic behind it. Dish soap removes the wax because it cuts through it as if it were "grease." This isn't something you want to do often because some claim it can remove oils from the paint itself, as well as rubber and vinyl on the outside of the vehicle. Once a year and regular treatment and I'm sure you will be fine.

However, removing the wax first isn't necessary. It's optional. the claybar itself may grab some off as you work, but it will work fine with or without wax on the paint.

After all is said and done wash the car again and then be sure to re-apply a nice coat of wax within a day.

Good luck! [thumb]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well thank you for clarifying that. From everything I've read on clay bars on this site, I was under the impression it really stripped EVERYTHING down and you really had to depend on a good wax to make up for it.

So what I could do is apply the polish by hand and buff it off with a buffer and apply the wax by hand and remove it with a buffer right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
surgeo1919 said:
Well thank you for clarifying that. From everything I've read on clay bars on this site, I was under the impression it really stripped EVERYTHING down and you really had to depend on a good wax to make up for it.

So what I could do is apply the polish by hand and buff it off with a buffer and apply the wax by hand and remove it with a buffer right?
If the clay bar doesn't take off all the wax, the polish should.

It's fine if you remove the wax with a buffer, preferably a slow speed buffer. Sometimes this is what you have to do to get the wax swirls out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
so using clay will get rid of swirl marks? I've been washing my car and then waxing it after and I have tons of swirl marks, especially in the sun, looks wicked bad, I saw my car and I wanted to freak... just like i wanted to freak when I drove 7 hours from MA to philly to find hundreds of mosquitos plastered to my front fascia [?|]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
Clay will not remove swirls. Again, clay removes particles from the top of the clearcoat, particles that can CAUSE swirl marks to be made. To remove swirl marks well, I would recommend washing first with DAWN to remove all your wax, clay bar your car to remove particles, wash again with regular car wash to remove any wax residue, then begin the polish and waxing. When I had a black car, the best product I could find was Zaino. I love Zaino. Zaino Z5 is great for getting rid of swirls. I've also heard good stuff about Einszett. Regardless of which you choose, you'll need to go through a couple steps of swirl remover, then a polish, then a wax. With dry time it could take a whole weekend, but its well worth the effort. I also prefer using only hand applicators and hand towels. With buffers you risk burning the paint. I'd only use the buffer for polishing compounds if you have deep scratches to remove.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
I really wouldn't recommend using dawn dish detergent to wash your car with. Wash with car wash, clay bar, polish, then wax. As I said before, the polish should remove all the wax.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top